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The Invention of the Restaurant: Paris and Modern Gastronomic Culture (Harvard Historical Studies) ePub download

by Rebecca L. Spang

  • Author: Rebecca L. Spang
  • ISBN: 0674006852
  • ISBN13: 978-0674006850
  • ePub: 1914 kb | FB2: 1485 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Cooking Education & Reference
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press; New edition edition (November 30, 2001)
  • Pages: 336
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 226
  • Format: lit doc lrf mobi
The Invention of the Restaurant: Paris and Modern Gastronomic Culture (Harvard Historical Studies) ePub download

The book follows the unfolding of the concept of the modern day restaurant as a downtown destination for the enjoyment of a good meal

For people who eat out so often that boiling a pot of spaghetti at home is a special occasion, a world without restaurants is hard to imagine. The book follows the unfolding of the concept of the modern day restaurant as a downtown destination for the enjoyment of a good meal. Opposed to just eating whatever was offered at inns as one was traveling. They were different situations.

Harvard Historical Studies 135. The Invention of the Restaurant. Paris and Modern Gastronomic Culture. This is a book about the French Revolution in taste and of the table-a book about how Parisians invented the modern culture of food, thereby changing their own social life and that of the world. During the 1760s and 1770s, those who were sensitive and supposedly suffering made public show of their delicacy by going to the new establishments known as restaurateurs’ rooms and there sipping their bouillons. By the 1790s, though, the table was variously seen as a place of decadent corruption or democratic solidarity.

Rebecca L. Spang does a great job of presenting a minutely documented . I purchased this book (and some others) as source books for some stories set in pre-Napoleon III Paris. Spang does a great job of presenting a minutely documented story of the evolution of the restaurant from the 18th to the 19th century, weaving together evidence from sources as disparate as police reports and restaurant menus. When I first read this book, I referred to the endnotes continuously; although doing so was very informative (and helped understand the context by presenting the primary sources), it did make the Agreed with Heather - very scholarly and comprehensive. This book provides a social history of the development of restaurant culture.

Harvard University Press. This article is a study of the development of modern European cuisine through an examination of the socio-cognitive schemas which shape the way social actors think of and about food

Harvard University Press. This article is a study of the development of modern European cuisine through an examination of the socio-cognitive schemas which shape the way social actors think of and about food. While the historical phase that spans from the late middle ages to modernity has been widely studied (mainly by historians) I advance a new interpretation which focuses on the influence of cognitive patterns on the structure of cuisine - the ways of eating, cooking and serving food.

From restoratives to Restoration, Spang establishes the restaurant at the very intersection of public and private in French culture-the first public place where people went to be private, and where taste played an increasingly significant.

From restoratives to Restoration, Spang establishes the restaurant at the very intersection of public and private in French culture-the first public place where people went to be private, and where taste played an increasingly significant role in creating and validating social and cultural distinctions. The Invention of the Restaurant: Paris and Modern Gastronomic Culture (Harvard Historical Studies).

Reading Rebecca Spang's Invention of the Restaurant: Paris and . Historian Rebecca Spang begins with an inspired question: Why are there restaurants?

Reading Rebecca Spang's Invention of the Restaurant: Paris and Modern Gastronomic Culture does not directly answer these questions on a personal level, but it does, with many insights, help illuminate the history and sociology of eating ou. .The Invention of the Restaurant deserves to be read by al. This is a book that works on a number of different levels. Historian Rebecca Spang begins with an inspired question: Why are there restaurants?

From restoratives to Restoration, Spang establishes the restaurant at the very . Rebecca L. Spang is Lecturer in Modern European History at University College London.

From restoratives to Restoration, Spang establishes the restaurant at the very intersection of public and private in French culture- the first public place where people went to be private, and where taste played an increasingly significant role in creating and validating social and cultural distinctions. This is a book about the French Revolution in taste and of the table - a book about how Parisians invented the modern culture of food, thereby changing their own social life and that of the world. Библиографические данные.

In the early nineteenth century, however, the new genre of gastronomic literature worked within the strictures of the Napoleonic police state to transform the notion of restaurants and to confer star status upon oysters and champagne.

of the Restaurant : Paris and Modern Gastronomic Culture. Release Date: November 2001. Publisher: Harvard University Press.

The Invention of the Restaurant : Paris and Modern Gastronomic Culture. Spang, Thomas J. Wilson. Harvard University Press, 2000 - 325 sayfa. This is a book about the French Revolution in taste and of the table - a book about how Parisians invented the modern culture of food, thereby changing their own social life and that of the world

Rebecca L. During the 1760s and 1770s, those who were sensitive and supposedly suffering made public show of their delicacy by going to the new establishments known as "restaurateurs' rooms" and there sipping their bouillons.

Why are there restaurants? Why would anybody consider eating to be an enjoyable leisure activity or even a serious pastime? To find the answer to these questions, we must accompany Rebecca Spang back to France in the eighteenth century, when a restaurant was not a place to eat but a thing to eat: a quasi-medicinal bouillon that formed an essential element of prerevolutionary France's nouvelle cuisine. This is a book about the French Revolution in taste and of the table--a book about how Parisians invented the modern culture of food, thereby changing their own social life and that of the world.

During the 1760s and 1770s, those who were sensitive and supposedly suffering made public show of their delicacy by going to the new establishments known as "restaurateurs' rooms" and there sipping their bouillons. By the 1790s, though, the table was variously seen as a place of decadent corruption or democratic solidarity. The Revolution's tables were sites for extending frugal, politically correct hospitality, and a delicate appetite was a sign of counter-revolutionary tendencies. The restaurants that had begun as purveyors of health food became symbols of aristocratic greed. In the early nineteenth century, however, the new genre of gastronomic literature worked within the strictures of the Napoleonic police state to transform the notion of restaurants and to confer star status upon oysters and champagne. Thus, the stage was set for the arrival of British and American tourists keen on discovering the mysteries of Frenchness in the capital's restaurants. From restoratives to Restoration, Spang establishes the restaurant at the very intersection of public and private in French culture--the first public place where people went to be private.

Naril
I purchased this book (and some others) as sourcebooks for some stories set in pre-Napoleon III Paris. The action does involve meals taken at restaurants, and while I was aware that the sidewalk café was a fairly recent invention, and it would be highly unlikely that the party that set out to dine at a restaurant would be given a number and told that their waitperson would seat them when a table came open. The organization, running, substance and practice of restaurants escaped me, and I needed to understand them.

The credentials of the author, who lectures about modern European history at University College, London, and the publisher, Harvard University Press, indicated that the information was likely to be accurate and useful. The samples that I read made it fairly clear that Ms. Spang could write an entertaining and informative account.

The material is comprehensive and useful. There is a lot of information there, and concepts are illustrated by contemporary accounts (such as the trial of some enterprising butchers who represented as rabbits what turned out to be cats. The case caused an uproar).

For my own purposes, I learned that a café was a place that sold primarily beverages while a restaurant sold a wider array of edibles. You could eat in a common room at a restaurant, or hire a private room (and some of those private rooms were hired for somewhat risque' purposes).

The book is illustrated with contemporary engravings and pictures, properly identified. I did not, myself, find much in the way of typos or poor layout.

The only complaint that I might have about this book is that the print is rather smaller than I generally like, the better to get a lot of information into a not-so-large package. I did not find it annoying enough to downgrade the book.

This is an excellent sourcebook and an often enjoying read, if you enjoy research. It is certainly not dry. I would recommend this to anyone interested in the subject, or in the greater subject of the evolution of European, and specifically Parisian, society in the seventeenth through nineteenth centuries.

...I must see if it is available in hardcover.
Gholbithris
This book is very interesting to read for those who like both history and cooking. An award - winning research, it helps you travel through time and space on the issue of the creation of the restaurant as it is today, in France and around the world as well.
Some questions, though, remain unaswered by this research. The first one is the amount of different food-selling houses there has been and their names and functions. Nowadays, to my recollection there are still several, apart from restaurants themselves. In order to help readers, the author should have had listed all of them, such as brasserie, charcuterie, patisserie, boulangerie, bar, bistrot etc, along with their formal menus, that were commanded by the State. It lacks a little information on the economic value of the restaurant -graphs containing meal prices through time should have helped us get a glimpse of its importance within the social public space of XIXTH Century France. It makes us wonder why the author states that the restaurant lost its political value as a public space at the end of the 1800's, was it a comparison with its fashionable wave during the French Revolution as she makes us believe? She surely forgot the role of the famous Maxim's Restaurant on the future of European rulers and nobleman at the turn of the XXth Century.
Although a good research, there are still more research left to do about this issue, and surely people like me who would love to read them through, trying to find thorough answers about the past.
Although it is a surely good research, and easy to read
Kuve
This is a remarkable. mind-blowing bit of historical detection, as well as an eminently readable, stylistically superlative piece of writing, with stunning visuals to boot. The author argues that the commonly accepted view of restaurants being the creation of the former chefs of aristocrats thrown out of work by the excesses of the French Revolution is incorrect. In a closely reasoned, copiously documented, snd exceptionally well-written book she highlights the role of an otherwise obscure French entrepreneur and his colleagues, who took advantage of a then-current theory that a plethora of individuals with "nervous stomachs" required institutions that would prepare "restoratives" for them, and that these institutions evolved into what we can now recognize as the precursors of restaurants. The verbal conjunction is no accident, in other words. Among the innovations of this group was the menu, hitherto unknown; that the internet now routinely provides menus of current restaurants to interested parties looking for enjoyable meals is a tribute to this group of Parisian pioneers. The text is accompanied by many graphics by Daumier and others that well illustrate issues with which the author deals. A delighjt to read and to view, and a major accomplishment.
Gavigamand
This book is a great source of information for learning about the culinary revolution in France and the birth of the restaurant. It was integral to my research paper on the paradigm shifts in cooking and tastes during the revolution in France. Very well put together.
Framokay
Great guide.
Ffrlel
Extremely intellectual book written by someone who is a lot more intelligent than I. I can only read a few pages at one sitting, but don't get me wrong. It is a well written book with a lot of information. For me, I must -um- digest it slowly. . . The book follows the unfolding of the concept of the modern day restaurant as a downtown destination for the enjoyment of a good meal. (Opposed to just eating whatever was offered at inns as one was traveling. They were different situations.)
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