» » Barolo (At Table)

Barolo (At Table) ePub download

by Matthew Gavin Frank

  • Author: Matthew Gavin Frank
  • ISBN: 0803226748
  • ISBN13: 978-0803226746
  • ePub: 1635 kb | FB2: 1637 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Beverages & Wine
  • Publisher: University of Nebraska Press (April 1, 2010)
  • Pages: 246
  • Rating: 4.6/5
  • Votes: 953
  • Format: mobi mbr lit txt
Barolo (At Table) ePub download

Matthew Gavin Frank worked for over fifteen years in the food and restaurant industry in positions ranging from dishwasher to sous-chef, server to sommelier, menu consultant to catering-business owner, farmhand to janitor.

Matthew Gavin Frank worked for over fifteen years in the food and restaurant industry in positions ranging from dishwasher to sous-chef, server to sommelier, menu consultant to catering-business owner, farmhand to janitor. An assistant professor of creative writing at Northern Michigan University, he has published essays in Gastronomica, Creative Nonfiction, and Best Food Writing 2006 and is the author of Pot Farm (Nebraska, 2012).

Matthew Gavin Frank's latest book: PREPARING THE GHOST: AN ESSAY CONCERNING THE GIANT SQUID .

Matthew Gavin Frank's latest book: PREPARING THE GHOST: AN ESSAY CONCERNING THE GIANT SQUID AND ITS FIRST PHOTOGRAPHER.

At once an intimate travelogue and a memoir of a culinary education, the book details the adventures of a not-so-innocent abroad in Barolo, a region known for its food and wine (also called Barolo). Upon arrival, Frank began picking wine grapes for famed vintner Luciano Sandrone

At once an intimate travelogue and a memoir of a culinary education, the book details the adventures of a not-so-innocent abroad in Barolo, a region known for its food and wine (also called Barolo). Upon arrival, Frank began picking wine grapes for famed vintner Luciano Sandrone. He tells how, between lessons in the art of the grape harvest, he discovered, explored, and savored the gustatory riches of Piemontese Italy. Along the way we meet the region's families and the many eccentric vintners, butchers, bakers, and restaurateurs who call Barolo home.

Matthew Gavin Frank is the author of The Mad Feast: An Ecstatic . Matthew Gavin Frank was born and raised in Chicago.

Matthew Gavin Frank is the author of The Mad Feast: An Ecstatic Tour Through America’s Food (. Norton: Liveright), Preparing the Ghost: An Essay Concerning the Giant Squid and Its First Photographer (. Bitten by the food, wine, and travel bug, he left home at age seventeen, embracing the vagabond lifestyle that often lent itself to work in the restaurant industry.

December 5, 2016 admin. By Matthew Gavin Frank

December 5, 2016 admin. By Matthew Gavin Frank. After a early life of microwaved meat and saturated fats, Matthew Gavin Frank acquired interested by nutrition. At as soon as an intimate travelogue and a memoir of a culinary schooling, the e-book info the adventures of a not-so-innocent in another country in Barolo, a quarter identified for its meals and wine (also referred to as Barolo). Upon arrival, Frank all started deciding upon wine grapes for famed vintner Luciano Sandrone.

A At once an intimate travelogue and a memoir of a culinary education, the book details the adventures of a not-so-innocent abroad in Barolo, a region known for its food and wine (also called Barolo)

After a childhood of microwaved meat and saturated fat, Matthew Gavin Frank got serious about food.

After a childhood of microwaved meat and saturated fat, Matthew Gavin Frank got serious about food. At once an intimate travelogue and a After a childhood of microwaved meat and saturated fat, Matthew Gavin Frank got serious about food.

Matthew Gavin Frank (born 1976) is an American writer, specializing in creative nonfiction, the lyric essay, literary food and travel writing, and poetry. At once an intimate travelogue and a memoir of a culinary education, the book details the adventures of a not-so-innocent abroad in Barolo, a region known for its food and wine (also called Barolo).

Six months of illegal work - picking grapes 14 hours a day, sleeping in a tent by night, talking with butchers, vintors, and tough guys the whole time in between - has cumulated in a book called Barolo, the memoirs of Matthew Gavin Frank’s life as vineyard laboror in the Barolo region of Italy. If the labels on wine bottles are meant to make the drinker dream fantasies of the places from which they came, then perhaps it was no accident that the art on the cover of Barolo is similar to that of a good bottle of wine: this seems to be a book to dream into.

After a childhood of microwaved meat and saturated fat, Matthew Gavin Frank got serious about food. His “research” ultimately led him to Barolo, Italy (pop. 646), where, living out of a tent in the garden of a local farmhouse, he resolved to learn about Italian food from the ground up. Barolo is Frank’s account of those six months. At once an intimate travelogue and a memoir of a culinary education, the book details the adventures of a not-so-innocent abroad in Barolo, a region known for its food and wine (also called Barolo). Upon arrival, Frank began picking wine grapes for famed vintner Luciano Sandrone. He tells how, between lessons in the art of the grape harvest, he discovered, explored, and savored the gustatory riches of Piemontese Italy. Along the way we meet the region’s families and the many eccentric vintners, butchers, bakers, and restaurateurs who call Barolo home. Rich with details of real Italian small-town life, local foodstuffs, strange markets, and a circuslike atmosphere, Frank’s story also offers a wealth of historical and culinary information, moments of flamboyance, and musings on foreign travel (and its many alien seductions), all filtered through food and wine. 
Arcanescar
I was pretty excited to receive this as I had never seen a book so singularly devoted to the amazing Barolo region of Italy. Matthew Frank writes in a dreamy style painting things in a sort of surreal, almost imaginary landscape, partly due to jet lag Im sure, but becomes so entangled in adjectives that I found it a bit pedantic. There were heaps of descriptives upon mounds of prepositions! It was all too much for me and at some points I felt like he was paid by the word. I would like to say that there was an overall feeling of joy and gratitude conveyed nicely by Frank of just being there in Barolo. I'm envious.
HeonIc
I run a monthly wine book club, and over the past three years we have read a wide range of books about wine. We usually read non-fiction, although we have read some fiction during the summer months. Everyone pays a flat fee, and I purchase wines that fit with the book.

I selected Frank's Barolo based on a review I read. In October 2009 we had read Alan Tardi's book, Romancing the Vine: Life, Love, and Transformation in the Vineyards of Barolo, so we had that and several other books about Italian wine as a basis of comparison (Palmento: A Sicilian Wine Odyssey (At Table),Passion on the Vine: A Memoir of Food, Wine, and Family in the Heart of Italy.)

What we liked about the book was the mouthwatering descriptions of the food, including the Slow Food Salone del Gusto, white truffles, and dinner at I Cannubi. The author's reality check about how tedious and exhausting it is to hand harvest grapes took some of the romance out of viticulture, while increasing our appreciation for the dedication of the workers to a quality product. His profile of the winemaker, Sandrone, portrayed the various sides of his life and personality. Frank did create a sense of the rhythm of life in the Barolo region of Italy.

Most of our members did not like Frank's writing style - it was self-conscious, a bit pompous and distracting from his story. I expected more from a professor of creative writing, and was disappointed; his style made it more of a biography (and a tale of unrequited love) and detracted from his descriptions of Barolo, both the region and the wine.

All in all, it provided a good basis for a wine tasting (we compared the 2004 Sandrone Barolo with 2 other Barolos from the same vintage, as well as sampling 6 other Piedmont reds.) Personally, I preferred Alan Tardi's book.
Mr.Bean
Great read especially for anyone who has visited this incredible region!
Fearlessrunner
Great location piece if you are interested in Barolo. Story is reasonably interesting. Writing style is below par and sometimes downright annoying.
Hystana
I was disappointed with the writer's use of the English language. It seemed he used words that were less common place in order to dazzle the reader; unfortunately it disrupted the flow of the story. As a reader I became more interested into why he selected that particular word for that sentence.
Kendis
The Piedmont wine country of northwestern Italy is not well known to American tourists to Italy. Barolo and other wines from Piedmont are also relatively lesser known even amongst wine connoisseurs. Good books on this region, its cusines, its wines and especially country life are not plentiful. The author has selected an excellent subject to write about. His approach about his life of several months in the region is intimate and observant. His descriptions about family, friends, meals and wine making are gems. He is definiely sincere about his appreciation and he does not show any of the jaded attitude that plague so many works in this genre. I appreciate that not everything is wonderful and not everyone is fantastic and great. His description of country life in Piedmont is very much worth reading. The later chapters on his trip to Turin to attend a fine food expo are quite wonderful. The author does have an annoying writing style that was exhibited especially earlier in the book. He is obssessed with the use of analogies and metaphors. So many things he describes are supposed to resemble something else and he goes on and on. At the start of chapter 5, he even indulges in an exercise of using many, one after an another, to progressively describe what "the sun drips", trying to arrive at the best metaphor to capture the most appropriate Italian ambiance. He finally settles on panna cotta. Please, the sun doesn't drip anything, least of all panna cotta (melted panna cotta?). Whatever happened to editing? He is not the only creative writing professor that over does writing tricks. Too bad they have students. Despite that, there is enough here to be a good read. This annoyance does subside as the book progresses. It is a good book if yoiu enjoy food, wine and an intmate look at Barolo wine country.
E-Books Related to Barolo (At Table):