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Eucharist: Christ's Feast with the Church ePub download

by Laurence Hull Stookey

  • Author: Laurence Hull Stookey
  • ISBN: 0687120179
  • ISBN13: 978-0687120178
  • ePub: 1497 kb | FB2: 1536 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Theology
  • Publisher: Abingdon Press; Later Printing edition (April 1, 1993)
  • Pages: 208
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 530
  • Format: azw rtf lit txt
Eucharist: Christ's Feast with the Church ePub download

Laurence Hull Stookey is Professor Emeritus of Preaching and Worship, Wesley Theological Seminary, Washington .

Laurence Hull Stookey is Professor Emeritus of Preaching and Worship, Wesley Theological Seminary, Washington,D. and Pastor of Asbury United Methodist Church in Allen, MD. He has authored the following books for Abingdon: Eucharist: Christ's Feast With the Church; Calendar: Christ's Time for the Church; Baptism: Christ's Act in the Church; Let the Whole Church Say Amen; and This Day: A Wesleyan Way of Prayer. also try lstookeyeyseminary.

Laurence Hull Stookey is Professor Emeritus of Preaching and Worship, Wesley Theological Seminary, Washington .

Laurence Hull Stookey has a wonderful trinity of books in this text and the companion volumes 'Baptism: Christ's Act .

Laurence Hull Stookey has a wonderful trinity of books in this text and the companion volumes 'Baptism: Christ's Act in the Church' and 'Calendar: Christ's Time for the Church'. These books address key aspects of Christian church practice in ecumenical and historical tones. Stookey's preface begins with a comparison of Babette's Feast and Christ's meal with the church - there is something hidden, something disarming, something inviting about the meal; we may not all approach it exactly the same way and with the same expectations, but those who feast do find it a nurturing banquet. As Stookey points out, eating and drinking are central to life and community.

208 pages, softcover. This book is envisioned as a follow up to Stookey's successful Baptism: Christ's Act in the Church, published in 1982

208 pages, softcover. Eucharist: Christ's Feast with the Church (9780687120178) by Laurence Hull Stookey. This book is envisioned as a follow up to Stookey's successful Baptism: Christ's Act in the Church, published in 1982. It will provide al perspective in a style that is "popular," rather than academically heavy; and, it will be ecumenical in scope, but with a concentration on Protestantism.

Start by marking Eucharist: Christ's Feast with the Church as Want to Read .

Start by marking Eucharist: Christ's Feast with the Church as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

This book is envisioned as a follow up to Stookey's successful Baptism: Christ's Act in the Church, published .

This book is envisioned as a follow up to Stookey's successful Baptism: Christ's Act in the Church, published in 1982.

Eucharist : Christ's Feast with the Church by Laurence H. Stookey (1993, Paperback). The book is the first volume of a two-part story of the american revolution. The book follows the time line from the first bloodshed in Boston, in March 1770, through the summer of 1776

Eucharist : Christ's Feast with the Church by Laurence H. The book follows the time line from the first bloodshed in Boston, in March 1770, through the summer of 1776. I have the second book, it is also a great book. And a must for readers who are interested in the American Revolution.

This book is envisioned as a follow up to Stookey's successful Baptism: Christ's Act in the Church, published in 1982. It will provide historical--theological perspective in a style that is "popular," rather than academically heavy; and, it will beecumenical in scope, but with a concentration on Protestantism. The shared Calvinian eucharistic tradition of Presbyterians, UCC, and Methodists will be particularly explored. It will also provide material pertinent to preaching, study of the eucharist by laity, and practical local reform that implements recent revisions of denominational rites.
Punind
Lawrence Hull Stookey is one of the scholastic luminaries of the United Methodist church and is especially wonderful when writing on matters of liturgy and sacramental theology. This work is no exception and it is not written for United Methodists. It is an ecumenical work which explains the things from the Catholic perspective and the Reformation tradition and looks at all major shadings in between as well as a few others. In doing so, he treats everyone with respect.

Stookey looks at the historical development of the various theologies associated with the Eucharist. He then looks at areas of convergeance and divergence, all the while asking the question, "How does this compare with what is current practice and with Biblical warrant" Besides looking at the problems, he also looks at possible solutions and pays attention not only to the theology of the subject but also the pastoral ministry. This is a well rounded and well thought out book suitable as a text in a seminary or a text for a class of laity who are interested in such matters. He will completely satisfy no one but he will make all think.

This one sets a gold standard.
Kabandis
Purchased this book for a class that I took, and it was very helpful and interesting
Nejind
Ordered by mistake. I returned it back for refund. I all ready had this book. So I ordered it again by mistake.
Road.to sliver
Very thorough and profound reading about the Sacraments.
Reemiel
A very informative and helpful book. It helped me to gain a fuller understanding of church liturgy and worship procedures.
Gnng
This book attempts to present an Ecumenical/Protestant perspective on the Eucharist. In this attempt, he is successful; however, there are some gaps within his presentation. These gaps are not so much because of a deficit of the book itself, but rather it is beyond the scope of the book. For example, while he succinctly examines different understandings of what Jesus’s real presence in the Eucharist means, he does bit go beyond an historical examination of this issue. In addition, he does not really go into a modern Eucharistic spirituality and what it means to be centered upon the Eucharist in the Christian life. Perhaps this is because of his Methodist perspective, which is quite ironic in that in an appendix to the book, the author claims that the Methodist revival was primarily a Eucharistic revival before it was anything else. Therefore, if one accepts the limitations of this book, it is quite useful for a general overview and reference for those interested I nth topic.
Undeyn
Laurence Hull Stookey has a wonderful trinity of books in this text and the companion volumes 'Baptism: Christ's Act in the Church' and 'Calendar: Christ's Time for the Church'. These books address key aspects of Christian church practice in ecumenical and historical tones. 'Eucharist' is no different - it is a one volume survey of historical, theological and practical issues surrounding the central facet of Eucharist / Lord's Supper / Communion. Stookey himself is a Methodist, but writes intentionally as an ecumenical writer; this particular text was completed while he was on sabbatical near a joint Anglican-Methodist seminary.

Stookey's preface begins with a comparison of Babette's Feast and Christ's meal with the church - there is something hidden, something disarming, something inviting about the meal; we may not all approach it exactly the same way and with the same expectations, but those who feast do find it a nurturing banquet. As Stookey points out, eating and drinking are central to life and community. Food is a common motif in the gospels; gathering together for meals is frequently cited from the time of the apostles forward as primary , and indeed the first ordained members of the church were those appointed to help serve the food.

Stookey gives a brief summary of New Testament images and writings about communion. He begins with Paul's instructions to the Corinthians, the text upon which many churches base the liturgies or prayers at Eucharist, given that they are the closest in time to the original Last Supper. He discusses terms such as 'anamnesis' and 'prolepsis' without becoming too bogged down in theology or exegetical analysis. Stookey highlights a few aspects of Paul's verses - that they are actions (more than concepts) central to the importance; they are corporate, not private, actions; they bind past, present and future together; and, they have evangelistic and soteriological (dealing with salvation) relevance.

Stookey also explores the images of the Last Supper in the synoptic gospels (Matthew, Mark and Luke), and quoting from Dom Gregory Dix, he states that the Last Supper is not something radically new, but rather a reinterpretation and deepening of already-existing practices, not least of whom the group of twelve themselves. While John's gospel does not include the Last Supper in the same way, Stookey argues that the whole of the gospel is in a way a commentary on the importance of the Eucharist - chapters like the water-into-wine at the wedding in Cana, the 'bread of life' chapter, and more all point to this.

Theologically, Stookey explores Platonic and Aristotelian ideas with regard to the Eucharist (as these are the two dominant philosophical schools underpinning Christian theology). These address issues of real presence and real substantive changes, and how those might be understood. Stookey also explores Nominalism, Lutheran, Zwinglian, Calvinist and later ideas regarding communion.

After this theological discussion, Stookey examines the way in which the eucharist practice has been carried out over time - quoting the Lutheran hymn ('from age to age the same'), he points out that how communion is done changes dramatically over time. Early Eucharistic feasts could be elaborate, full congregational and full day meal. Stookey highlights liturgical practices of Justin Martyr and Hippolytus and the pre-Constantinian church, as well as shifts after this key official date. Stookey describes the practices of some Eucharistic traditions (the 'dry masses', the remoteness of the public, etc.) as well as reformer and modern innovations that sometimes restore the Eucharist back to its original formulations, at least somewhat.

Stookey puts forward a renewed Eucharist platform that takes into account contemporary and ancient principles and practices, recovering sacramental ideas, the presence of Christ, the work of the Holy Spirit, and the work of the people. He includes a good length discussion of practices, elements and settings for communion services, some things to avoid, and ideas to incorporate into the denominational and local adaptations that natural occur in such practices anyway. Stookey addresses the issue of ecumenical actions, highlighting some divergences that make the one-service-fits-all approach unlikely to succeed.

He concludes with two appendices - one looking at issues around communion taken to the sick and otherwise-unable-to-attend, and one looking at particular issues in the Wesleyan/Methodist traditions.

There will be points of divergence to be sure; he points out some historic ironies along the way (such as the closer familiarity of Eucharist practices between Roman Catholics and Lutherans than the Lutherans and Presbyterians, both Protestant churches), and cautions that not all of his ideas and analysis will be fitting or welcome in all denominational settings. Nevertheless, the issues addressed are important ones, and Stookey's writing is clear, concise, accessible and worthwhile.
The author writes this book in a response to a need for a single volume that brings together historical, theological, and practical matters from a variety of sources. Much of the material available on this subject is written in a technical style that is not easily read or understood by the lay person. The author also seeks to suggest new ways of understanding and conducting the Eucharist. He identifies two audiences for his book. The first audience is lay people in the local church. A second audience is identified as seminarians and church professionals. The author writes from a Wesleyan/Methodist background, but seeks to produce a work that is ecumenical in scope. Stookey wants to clear up misconceptions about the Eucharist and to help the reader develop a historical and theological understanding that will affect the way the Eucharist is observed and shared in our churches. Stookey has succeeded in his objectives. I found the book to be well laid out, fairly easy to read, and quite engaging. Especially helpful was the section about how to preach on the Eucharist, and an emphasis that the observance of the Eucharist is not a solemn occasion, but a celebrative one! This book belongs in every pastor's library.
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