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Satan: A Biography ePub download

by Henry Ansgar Kelly

  • Author: Henry Ansgar Kelly
  • ISBN: 0521604028
  • ISBN13: 978-0521604024
  • ePub: 1904 kb | FB2: 1736 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Theology
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (August 14, 2006)
  • Pages: 376
  • Rating: 4.8/5
  • Votes: 956
  • Format: lrf lrf mobi lit
Satan: A Biography ePub download

Kelly received his . in Classics from St. Louis University in 1959 and two years later his . in English Literature and P.

Kelly received his . in Philosophy from the same university. He entered Harvard University in 1961, receiving his P. During his time at Harvard Kelly was selected as a Junior Fellow by the Harvard Society of Fellows.

Rather, Satan is merely an Accuser, and a useful one at that. Kelly begins with the oldest Biblical books, travels through the Septuagint translation and inter-testamental writings such as 1 Enoch and Jubilees, and wraps up the first half of his book with the Dead Sea Scrolls and the New Testament. In these writings, we see the picture of Satan remaining largely unchanged: Satan is a functionary of the Divine Government, charged with testing and disciplining mankind.

Christianity's development of this figure concerns Henry Ansgar Kelly, a retired academic from California

Christianity's development of this figure concerns Henry Ansgar Kelly, a retired academic from California. We’ll tell you what’s true. You can form your own view.

Christians traditionally think of Satan as Lucifer, God's enemy, who rebelled.

Kelly traces the further developments of the 'New Biography': humankind's inherited guilt, captivity by Satan, and punishment in Hell at his hands. This profile of Satan remains dominant, but Kelly urges a return to the 'Original Biography of Satan'. Christians traditionally think of Satan as Lucifer, God's enemy, who rebelled against Him out of pride and then caused Adam and Eve to sin. But, as Kelly shows, this portrayal is not biblical but a scenario invented by the early Fathers of the Church which became the 'New Biography of Satan'.

Cambridge University Press, 17 Ağu 2006 - 360 sayfa. Kelly traces the further developments of the 'New Biography': humankind's inherited guilt, captivity by Satan, and punishment in Hell at his hands. Bu kitaba önizleme yap . Kullanıcılar ne diyor?

This profile of Satan remains dominant, but Kelly urges a return to the 'Original Biography of Satan' . the book intriguingly and meticulously .

This profile of Satan remains dominant, but Kelly urges a return to the 'Original Biography of Satan'. Format Paperback 376 pages the book intriguingly and meticulously maps each minute twist and turn in Satan's "biography. Henry Ansgar Kelly is Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Department of English and Director of the Center of Medieval Studies, University of California, Los Angeles.

Professor Henry Ansgar Kelly. Place of Publication. Country of Publication.

Satan by Henry Ansgar Kelly A Biography. The 'Original Biography' must be reconstructed from the New Testament where Satan is the same sort of celestial functionary we see in the Book of Job - appointed to govern the world, specifically to monitor and test human beings. But he is brutal and deceitful in his methods, and Jesus predicts that his rule will soon come to an end.

Ideas and Forms of Tragedy from Aristotle to the Middle Ages) Author: Henry Ansgar Kelly published on (May, 2004)

Ideas and Forms of Tragedy from Aristotle to the Middle Ages) Author: Henry Ansgar Kelly published on (May, 2004). 'Tragedy' has been understood in a variety of conflicting ways over the centuries, and the term has been applied to a wide range of literary works.

Christians traditionally think of Satan as Lucifer, God's enemy, who rebelled against Him out of pride and then caused Adam and Eve to sin. But, as Kelly shows, this portrayal is not biblical but a scenario invented by the early Fathers of the Church which became the 'New Biography of Satan'. The 'Original Biography' must be reconstructed from the New Testament where Satan is the same sort of celestial functionary we see in the Book of Job - appointed to govern the world, specifically to monitor and test human beings. But he is brutal and deceitful in his methods, and Jesus predicts that his rule will soon come to an end. Kelly traces the further developments of the 'New Biography': humankind's inherited guilt, captivity by Satan, and punishment in Hell at his hands. This profile of Satan remains dominant, but Kelly urges a return to the 'Original Biography of Satan'.
Ces
This is not for the faint of faith. Kelly's book takes a deep look at the darker side of religion by following the progression of Satan from the earliest origins of deities deemed "evil" or "bad" all the way up to modern day understandings. The preface does a good job of noting that this is not a technical book and is intended to be read by those interested, not those who've studied religion before. There is a bit of a learning curve to it and it might even be worth taking notes as you go. Personally, I find this book very interesting and my college class, "History of Satan," used it as a text book. Satan, Lucifer, Devil, Beast, Baalzebul, Mastema, and many other names are thrown about and discussed as to how they all became the single, patchwork quilt of character we known and love to hate today. Kelly's style is dense. I wouldn't say prior knowledge is required, though it may help.
invincible
First rate scholar who uses logic rather skillfully to advance his arguments.
Qusserel
A great subject and it has gotten some great reviews but I am no Biblical scholar and found the text to be very bland and dull. Almost something that you would expect to have to read in an advanced college course. I had a passing interest in the subject but the writing did not do much to pull me in.
Sat
While the scholarship here is excellent, be aware that this is really only Satan in the ancient world. If you're looking for a survey that goes until the 21st century, this isn't the book for you.
Charyoll
A strange book; I'm not entirely sure what to make of it. Kelly's premise, and he is quite serious, is that Satan is a badly misunderstood fellow. That the Satan we know today bears little or no resemblance to the Biblical Satan.

As far as I can tell, Kelly is a believer in the Bible and in Satan, and wants to set the record straight. He doesn't appreciate the legends that have sprung up about Satan since the writing of the Bible. Satan, for example, has nothing to do with the serpent in the Garden of Eden; that association began with the early church fathers. He has not yet been thrown out of heaven. He is not evil, and certainly will not be put in charge of punishing the damned in Hell.

Rather, Satan is merely an Accuser, and a useful one at that. Kelly begins with the oldest Biblical books, travels through the Septuagint translation and inter-testamental writings such as 1 Enoch and Jubilees, and wraps up the first half of his book with the Dead Sea Scrolls and the New Testament. In these writings, we see the picture of Satan remaining largely unchanged: Satan is a functionary of the Divine Government, charged with testing and disciplining mankind. He is suspicious of everyone, including Jesus. He is hostile to Jesus' followers, constantly trying to trip them up and then lodge complaints against them before God. He is God's Chief Tester, at worst a homicidal liar.

Then in the second half, Kelly methodically traverses the next 2,000 years and how Satan's name has been corrupted.

I agree with Kelly that the understanding of Satan/Devil/Lucifer has evolved quite radically. I'm just not sure I agree with his timing. For example, I think Satan had evolved into God's adversary in the minds of most believers before the New Testament was written, and I think the same about Satan's connection with the serpent of Eden. Moreover, different Biblical writers appear to have had different ideas. I just don't think the line is as crisp as Kelly draws. Nevertheless, it's a book to make you think, and though the writing is a bit dry, I did enjoy the discussion, so I'll give it four stars.
Love Me
In contrast to other reviewers, I found the book to be very useful actually.

It's one of those books that does what it says on the tin, and pretty much lists every reference to Satan in the Bible and brings a number of interesting concepts to light.

No, it's not written by a theologian, and if you want one written by a theologian, I'd recommend The Birth of Satan: Tracing the Devil's Biblical Roots by Wray and Mobley.

Some people are a bit snobbish when it comes to theological books because they make a distinction between theologians and 'laymen'. I do too. But that doesn't mean non-theologians books are non-useful. One has to remember that most of the New Testament were written by laymen.

Also, once you've read a number of theologians, you eventually realise "Oh dear...scholars love to contradict each other and disagree."

Personally, I'd recommend this book if you want to have a good overview of the topic of Satan.

I didn't read anything that was contradicted by official theologians, and have found it useful to explain things to others.

So yes, even though I went to seminary, and have studied the official theologians, and have read the writings of the Early Church, and studied Koine Greek, I still think that this book would be very useful, although when I bought it, it was much cheaper!
Nuadabandis
Very interesting book. It's the best written essay about Satan I've ever read. For many years I've been trying to find a book able to disentangle the character of Satan in the Bible and beyond. After going through several of them in Spanish, French and English; this is no doubt the best.
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