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The Barn at the End of the World: The Apprenticeship of a Quaker, Buddhist Shepherd ePub download

by Mary Rose O'Reilley

  • Author: Mary Rose O'Reilley
  • ISBN: 1571312544
  • ISBN13: 978-1571312549
  • ePub: 1209 kb | FB2: 1479 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Protestantism
  • Publisher: Milkweed Editions; First Trade Paper edition (October 10, 2001)
  • Pages: 344
  • Rating: 4.1/5
  • Votes: 172
  • Format: lrf txt azw rtf
The Barn at the End of the World: The Apprenticeship of a Quaker, Buddhist Shepherd ePub download

For Mary Rose O’Reilley a year tending sheep seemed a way to seek a spirituality based not on climbing . Very different books, at the end of the day, but both women think and write from deep religious traditions in their lives.

For Mary Rose O’Reilley a year tending sheep seemed a way to seek a spirituality based not on climbing out of the body but rather on existing fully in the world. Likewise, both have an abiding love for "the land," concretely and metaphorically, so what you hear at the end of that same day are calm but passonate voices that make you listen, make you want to listen hard to the observations, but with sense of deep fulfillment for the experience of it.

For Mary Rose O’Reilley a year tending sheep seemed a way to seek a spirituality based not on climbing out of. .

For Mary Rose O’Reilley a year tending sheep seemed a way to seek a spirituality based not on climbing out of the body but rather on existing fully in the world, at least if she could overlook some of its earthier aspects. The Barn at the End of the World follows O’Reilley in her sometimes funny, sometimes moving quest. Though small Transcendence can come in many forms. Mary Rose O'Reilley must be one fascinating lady!! Someone who can move easily between the world of her Catholic past, to a year spent taking care of sheep, into Plum Village Buddhist monastery with Thich N'hat Hanh, to the classroom as an English teacher, and home again to her Quaker community.

Xiv, 317 pages ; 24 cm. O'Reilley, a Quaker raised as a Catholic, embarks on a year working on a sheep farm and visiting a Buddhist monastery in France. Includes bibliographical references. Surrender - 8 am in the sheep barn - As if - Facts - Catching and slipping and shearing - Green pastures - Health food - Shopping for coffee - Choirs of Seraphim - On call - Nature - Acceptance of the present - Bound for Canaan - The Shelagh. Ordinary time - Sweeping - Is it necessary to have a plow? -.

Transcendence can come in many forms. For Mary Rose O Reilley a year tending sheep seemed a way to seek a spirituality based not on climbing out of the body but rather on existing fully in the world, at least if she could overlook some of its earthier aspects. The Barn at the End of the World follows O Reilley in her sometimes funny, sometimes moving quest. Though small in stature, she learns to flip very large sheep and help them lamb.

By Mary Rose O'Reilley. To define oneself as an apprentice is to admit both inexperience and vulnerability. Learning how to care for sheep is hardly the sort of education expected of an English professor, yet that is what Mary Rose O'Reilley has done, while at the same time reflecting on the spiritual dimension of life. Weaving in and out of her past, she leads us along the winding path of her earthly and spiritual adventures.

Deciding that her life was insufficiently grounded in real-world experience, Mary Rose O'Reilley, a Quaker reared as a Catholic, embarked on a year of tending sheep. In this often hilarious book, O'Reilley describes her work in an agricultural barn and her extended visit to a Buddhist monastery in France, where she studied with Thich N'hat Hanh. She seeks, in both barn and monastery, a spirituality based not in climbing out of the body but rather in existing fully in the world. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

The Barn At the End Of the World The Apprenticeship Of a Quaker, Buddhist Shepherd Mary Rose O'Reilley .

The Barn At the End Of the World The Apprenticeship Of a Quaker, Buddhist Shepherd Mary Rose O'Reilley (Milkweed). Whenever people ask Mary Rose O'Reilley what she does for a living, she says, "I take care of sheep.

For Mary Rose O’Reilley a year tending sheep seemed a way to seek a spirituality based not on “climbing out of the body” but rather on existing fully in the world, at least if she could overlook some of its earthier aspects

For Mary Rose O’Reilley a year tending sheep seemed a way to seek a spirituality based not on “climbing out of the body” but rather on existing fully in the world, at least if she could overlook some of its earthier aspects. The Barn at the End of the World follows O’Reilley in her sometimes funny, sometimes moving quest. Though small in stature, she learns to “flip” very large sheep and help them lamb.

Written by. Mary Rose O'Reilley. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

real-world experience, Mary Rose O'Reilley, a Quaker reared as a Catholic, embarked on a year of tending sheep

lt;DIV Deciding that her life was insufficiently grounded in real-world experience, Mary Rose O'Reilley, a Quaker reared as a Catholic, embarked on a year of tending sheep. She seeks, in both barn and monastery, a spirituality based not in ""climbing out of the body"" but rather in existing fully in the world. test cricket, Perth (WA), "Parkes, Henry". Separate different tags with a comma. To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes.

Transcendence can come in many forms. For Mary Rose O’Reilley a year tending sheep seemed a way to seek a spirituality based not on “climbing out of the body” but rather on existing fully in the world, at least if she could overlook some of its earthier aspects. The Barn at the End of the World follows O’Reilley in her sometimes funny, sometimes moving quest. Though small in stature, she learns to “flip” very large sheep and help them lamb. She also visits a Buddhist monastery in France, where she studies the practice of Mahayana Buddhism, dividing her spare time between meditation and dreaming of French pastries.
Mbon
I looked for this book for awhile at my local 2d hand bookstore when I buy most of my books but it never showed up. I finally bought it and - WOW! - it's one of the best books I've read this year. I'm buying copies for gifts for my closest friends. Not a new book - where has it been? If I hadn't seen it reviewed in a relatively obscure magazine, I never would've heard of it.
Very readable. Very thought-provoking. Very funny in parts.
It appeals to the spiritual side, the rebellious side and the practical side in each of us.
Fascinating to read about a down-to-earth person's choices for alternative lifestyles.
This book has inspired me to follow my dreams.
Ubranzac
I requested and received this book as a gift 2 years ago. I read about 40 pages and then for some reason I left it on the night stand with a bookmark in the place where I had stopped. I picked it up again recently when I was down with a respiratory infection and feeling sorry for myself.

I've enjoyed Mary Rose O'Reilley as an author who can nudge me out of such a place. Her book Radical Presence got me over a bad attitude about teaching. Her book of poems Half Wild saw me through the year before I retired when I was half in and half out of a professional mind. Now The Barn at the End of World has offered up pages of wisdom and load of notes about things I want to remember.

Here is a favorite line: "My religious nature is omnivorous. I can worship anything that occupies a certain slant of light." I listened differently after reading this: "We habitually ignore impulses in our lives that don't fit the cultural script." I volunteered to help a friend on a llama farm after following O'Reilley's adventures in the sheep barn--not romantically but ready to shovel shit with a purpose. Her honest report about her time at Plum Village gave me hope! Those retreats are a hell that have taught me much but more importantly she reminded me that "The universe is such an efficient school." I don't have to go to a retreat to learn. Best of all is learning the meditation hug: "Go deeply inside yourself and say: 'breathing deeply I open like a flower.' Then hug. Three times." I'm so glad I dusted this book and kept reading.
Fordrelis
In the past 15 years, I've read two, "personal memoir"-type books by women writers that totally blew my doors off: Terry Tempest Williams' "Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place" and Mary Rose O'Reilly's "The Barn at the End of the World: The Apprenticeship of a Quaker, Buddhist Shepherd." Very different books, at the end of the day, but both women think and write from deep religious traditions in their lives. Likewise, both have an abiding love for "the land," concretely and metaphorically, so what you hear at the end of that same day are calm but passonate voices that make you listen, make you want to listen hard to the observations, but with sense of deep fulfillment for the experience of it.

As for "Barn," I am neither a Quaker, a Buddhist, a farmer, a teacher nor an "older, adventurous woman" (as one reviewer suggested would be the type of person who would enjoy "Barn"). SO WHAT! "Barn" is a truly a banquet of wise and penetrating insights into the essence work (and working with and caring for animals in particular), of friendship, love, responsibility, accountability to yourself and to others, silence, mediation, the sacred, and, ultimately living honestly. There is much humor, gentleness, and "character" (for want of a better word to describe her inner strength) in the 90-odd "chapters" (some as short as 1 page) that are more like mini-essays on discrete but interrelated topics, so much so that I found myself going back, often, re-reading passages, savoring her prose and her insights, shutting the book, just letting the writing sink in. "Barn," resonated with me (an "semi-older, adventurous man") on more levels than I could ever have predicted. I'm a big fan of Thich Nhat Hanh's work, so the chapters recounting her experience at Plum Village and Thay's "dharma talks" were an added "bonus." Give it a shot, and take your time reading it; it's worth it.
FireWater
Who could resist the title, along with the beautiful cover? The chapters are short, and the content is a fascinating mix as our heroine, Mary Rose O'Reilly tells us what is going on in her true life. Her sons are grown and she's decided to work in a barn, with a young man named Ben and a lot of sheep. She moves from the day-to-day workings of sheep work - it isn't at all what you might think, the lovely young shepherdess herding the sheep through the meadows. Aside from sheep sheering, there is more than some of us need to know about sheep - I can't go into details here, but there is something about rubber bands and the rear-end of the sheep that can only be described within the context of the book. In addition, she moves from her days as a Catholic novice to her life as a Quaker and a Buddhist, to her trip to England to sing with a musical group, Sacred Harps. This is definitely not a deep read, not the answer to a spiritual quest. If you like well-written books which meander a bit (this IS a book by a woman going through the some changes in her life), you will probably enjoy this one. I've nibbled my way through this book, a chapter here, a chapter there. It is a beautiful book to give as a gift, perhaps to a 50-something woman with an interest in spirituality, music and nature! Might be great in paperback, but that's a year away...
Llallayue
I relate to O'Reilley's eclectic approach to spirituality, her life in the midwest, and her agricultural experiences. I appreciate her honesty about her own fears and faults. I enjoyed her descriptions of places and personalities, both human and animal. May sound trite, but I laughed and cried, was stimulated and entertained. Bought the book for a friend, then decided to read it before giving it. Then, because I wanted to share the experience with my friend, I sent her a second copy. She says she loves the book, too. I'll be shopping for more of O'Reilley's writing to read and share.
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