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Stealing Adda: A Novel ePub download

by Tamara Leigh

  • Author: Tamara Leigh
  • ISBN: 1576839257
  • ISBN13: 978-1576839256
  • ePub: 1368 kb | FB2: 1423 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Literature & Fiction
  • Publisher: NavPress; Student/Stdy Gde edition (February 28, 2006)
  • Pages: 464
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 844
  • Format: lrf mbr lrf rtf
Stealing Adda: A Novel ePub download

Stealing Adda has a good Christian message wrapped up in an interesting storyline. I was glad to see Tamara Leigh handles a contemporary novel as well as historical novels.

Writer’s block, nibbled nails, plagiarism, oh my! And DID I mention. Stealing Adda has a good Christian message wrapped up in an interesting storyline. Nick is definitely swoon-worthy as he can’t seem to resist Adda, even when he truly doesn’t wants to. Adda’s ability to always get herself into trouble was endearing and I could certainly relate to her.

Clean read historical romance. The scanning, uploading, and distribution of this book via the Internet or any other means without the author’s permission is illegal and punishable by law.

In ‘Stealing Adda’, we follow the life and plight of Adda, a New York Times best-selling romance novelist, as she navigates the pressures . Tamara Leigh really shines in her medieval novels. I would recommend those over this book.

In ‘Stealing Adda’, we follow the life and plight of Adda, a New York Times best-selling romance novelist, as she navigates the pressures of deadlines, writer’s block, fans, and unscrupulous and immoral people in both her professional and personal life. Adda’s quirks and rich personality were a highlight, but it was the exposed and tender emotions that sometimes surfaced that really affected me deeply.

This novel is a work of fiction. Names, characters, places, incidents, and dialogues are either the product of the author’s imagination or are used fictitiously.

Inspirational novels. Age of Faith: A Medieval Romance Series. The Redeeming: Book Three, Spring 2013. Faking Grace, h, 2008. Splitting Harriet, h, 2007. Perfecting Kate, Multnomah, 2007. This novel is a work of fiction. Any resemblance to actual events, locales, organizations, or persons, living or dead, is entirely coincidental and beyond the intent of the author.

He who steals a hook gets hanged as a crook; he who steals a kingdom becomes a duke. Those who steal the world and the hearts of the people become a Divine Immortal. The Dao of the universe is boundless, and the will of mortals is limitless

He who steals a hook gets hanged as a crook; he who steals a kingdom becomes a duke. The Dao of the universe is boundless, and the will of mortals is limitless. Follow me and watch how I alone use my hands to steal the heavens! Translator's synopsis: An unexpected discovery in Machu Picchu has transported a young professional thief from Earth to a world filled with mystical powers and evil plots.

Stealing Adda : a novel. Surely it's more than just The Good Book. Divorced women, Women novelists, Writer's block, Divorced women, Women novelists, Writer's block. Colorado Springs, Colo. Or is it? Bookplateleaf. Sony Alpha-A6300 (Control).

Lady Of Eve by Tamara Leigh designed by Ravven Kitsune. JF: Contrast this cover with With Empty Hands and Beautifully Wounded immediately above

Lady Of Eve by Tamara Leigh designed by Ravven Kitsune. JF: Contrast this cover with With Empty Hands and Beautifully Wounded immediately above. Pretty much the same elements, but here the designer is in complete control, and every detail helps to propel us into the story; the woman’s gaze, her tentative hands, and the castle, where all our attention is directed.

Tamara Leigh has been writing since 1994. Leigh's first novel, Warrior Bride, was followed by six more best-selling, award-winning romances in the general market. Her inspirational Chick-Lit debut, Stealing Adda, was published in 2006 to great critical acclaim. Her twelve novels include Faking Grace; Splitting Harriet, an American Christian Fiction Writers "Book of the Year" winner and RITA Award finalist; and Perfecting Kate.

Tamara Leigh is an award-winning USA Today Bestselling author of Medieval Romance, Inspirational Historical Romance .

Tamara Leigh is an award-winning USA Today Bestselling author of Medieval Romance, Inspirational Historical Romance, and Contemporary Romance from RandomHouse . What ensues is delightful, romantic chick lit at its best, with a quirky protagonist addicted to Jelly Bellys who needs the spark that Maddox puts back into her life.

Bestselling romance author Adda Sinclaire has writer's block. Just when she catches her breath-and quite possibly the eye of a certain fabulously good-looking man--her arch-nemesis gives the pot one final stir.
Alianyau
I read Tamara Leigh for her medieval books (of which I've read every one) and it look me a long time to cave and read this one. I finally did but only because she wrote it. I guess that's what it means to have a fan base. ;) Anyways, I loved it. Even if there were certain things about the story I didn't like, Tamara has a way of making you happy when you read her books. I laughed so much while reading (and got a few raised eyebrow looks from the husband in the process). And I love the nod to her medieval book series "The Feud" (which didn't come out for another 5 or so years after this one did). Really gave me the inside scoop on what her life is like (fictionally, I'm sure).
Adaly
With multiple bestsellers to her name, a personal assistant, and a hot new editor eyeing her books--and maybe more--romance novelist Adda Sinclaire seems to have it all. Under the surface though, her life is a wreck. Adda's ex cheated on her with fellow novelist and nemesis Birgitta Roth, AKA Stick Woman--who, by the way, took her beloved dog. A raging case of writer's block has her latest book and possibly career stalled. She ends up in the public eye for all the wrong reasons--including literally pulling out Birgitta's hair at a writer's conference. What's a girl to do?

Stealing Adda starts off a little iffy. I admit, at first I didn't even like Adda. She comes off career-driven and shallow, and her only interest besides writing seems to be her collection of over seventy-four nail polishes. She also gives everyone she knows mean or borderline mean nicknames, and has no qualms about letting her Improper side out to wreak havoc on the world. Then again, she spends 95% of the novel as a nonbeliever, so I guess I can't exactly blame her. Actually, fairly soon after getting to know her, Adda becomes endearing. She's snarky but can often be funny. She writes steamy romance but truly believes in what she's doing and holds fast to her self-respect when it comes to real-life men. Her intelligence and zest for life come through on the page, and her romantic and other trials make her relatable.

As a writer myself--though nowhere near where Adda is--I appreciated the probing look into the life of a bestselling novelist. The contrast between fancy restaurants and glitzy conferences vs. sleepless nights, writer's block, and salacious rumors, is sharp and on point. A shared career also gives Adda and Nick's romance extra depth, as they navigate the pitfalls of working with and falling for each other.

Tamara Leigh's secondary characters are quirky, interesting, and delightful. Adda has a couple of great mentors, Joyce Keuhner (AKA Puffer) and Elizabeth Carp, whose contrasting personalities make for a good look into the different parts of Adda's own psyche. Birgitta Roth becomes a villain you love to hate, and Adda's family is delightful too, though they don't get much page time.

Other reviewers have said Stealing Adda's Christian message is too strong. If what they mean by that is Adda's interactions with the Bible, and how keeping Psalm 31 at the forefront of her mind seems to pull her out of trouble at the last second--yeah, I can kind of see that. In fact, the placement of Christian elements seemed odd at times, considering almost no one in Adda's circle was a believer. But since, as mentioned, our protagonist is not a Christian, nor does she run with them, the message is often more subtle than other reviewers have given it credit for. It's a weird mix that doesn't always work. Maybe if we'd seen some more interest in Christianity from Adda, or more character development for Nick, Sophia, and other Christians?

Finally, I think I'd have liked the book better if Adda's life was a little less perfect on the outside. Perhaps if she'd been a mid-list novelist or someone trying to navigate publishing for the first time. Perhaps if she'd been an unknown author with a runaway bestseller. I only say that because such a small percentage of authors in any genre ever attain what she did. It sometimes makes Adda feel unrealistic. That said, her story is one I'll hang onto. I'm also interested to see how it compares with Rachel Hauck's The Writing Desk and The Secret Life of Sara Hollenbeck, coming out this fall.
Darkraven
Author Tamara Leigh’s ingenious wit and satirical comedy knows no bounds in Stealing Adda. Captivating and entertaining from start to finish, I was as addicted to this story as Adda was to her infinite range of nail polish! In ‘Stealing Adda’, we follow the life and plight of Adda, a New York Times best-selling romance novelist, as she navigates the pressures of deadlines, writer’s block, fans, and unscrupulous and immoral people in both her professional and personal life. Not to mention a certain handsome, smoldering-eyed editor. Adda’s quirks and rich personality were a highlight, but it was the exposed and tender emotions that sometimes surfaced that really affected me deeply. To say that Tamara Leigh has a way with words is an understatement, and testament to that was the fact I was both laughing and crying throughout this story… Once, at the same time! I highly recommend this inspiring and engaging novel!
LiTTLe_NiGGa_in_THE_СribE
I have read several other Tamara Leigh novels and enjoyed them, so this novel was a bit of a letdown for me. It's a very interesting behind the scenes look at what it's like to be a romance novel author, but the story itself for me was sort of meh. Honestly, this book felt more like an autobiography, or at least it felt like the author was giving a fictionalized account of her own experiences rather than a story about made up people where you can dive in and get lost for a few hours. There are some novels where the characters are speaking, but it feels more like the author is using the character to state their own opinions. That's how much of this book felt for me.

This is the most direct Leigh has been with her Christian message, but it rubbed me wrong the entire book. In particular, the way the main character totally dismissed the Old Testament as irrelevant, and referred to the New Testament as the "love and grace" part of the Bible. While I get that the main character was in the searching process, it sounded more like the author (who presumably is a Christian) was trying too hard to sound like what she THINKS a skeptical unbeliever would think like, but used terminology and phrasing that only someone with a church background would use. It just came off as inauthentic to me.

As far as the story/romance itself, I just felt like it really gave way to the description of life as a romance author. The author repeatedly drove home her point about how romance authors aren't taken seriously, romance accounts for billions of dollars in sales, etc. The story felt less about Adda, and more about Tamara Leigh getting some stuff off her chest. The romance with Nick (the little that was in the book) was good, but you don't really get a sense of where his head is at throughout the novel. He's basically just an accessory to the novel.

The book definitely has some humorous moments, mostly when the author gets back to telling Adda's story rather than her own. I was disappointed that with all the time the author spent detailing Adda's search for God, when she finally does come to faith, it's mentioned in passing like it was no big deal. Also, Nick and Sophie's big reveal just felt so forced and again, inauthentic.

Tamara Leigh really shines in her medieval novels. I would recommend those over this book.
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