» » From Mask to Icon: Transformation in the Arctic

From Mask to Icon: Transformation in the Arctic ePub download

by S. A. Mousalimas

  • Author: S. A. Mousalimas
  • ISBN: 1885652631
  • ISBN13: 978-1885652638
  • ePub: 1310 kb | FB2: 1327 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Christian Denominations & Sects
  • Publisher: Holy Cross Orthodox Press (November 10, 2004)
  • Pages: 288
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 181
  • Format: rtf lit mbr azw
From Mask to Icon: Transformation in the Arctic ePub download

From Mask to Icon book.

From Mask to Icon book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. From Mask to Icon: Transformation in the Arctic. by. S. A. Mousalimas.

From Mask to Icon: Transformation in the Arctic Nov 10, 2004. The Transition from Shamanism to Russian Orthodoxy in Alaska May 01, 1995. Usually ships within 6 days. 99 (2 Used & New offers).

T/A Author, From Mask to Icon: Transformation in the Arctic, Hungarian Academy of Sciences an. .

T/A Author, From Mask to Icon: Transformation in the Arctic, Brookline, MA (2003). T/A Author, The Transition from Shamanism to Russian Orthodoxy in Alaska, Oxford (1995).

Transformation in the Arctic.

RTE: One of the revelations in reading native Alaskan Orthodox history such as Alaskan Missionary Spirituality, or From Mask to Icon: Transformation in the Arctic, is how Orthodoxy was very much initially embraced and then kept alive by the native peoples, sometimes without seeing a priest for years.

Masks among Eskimo peoples served a variety of functions. Masks were made out of driftwood, animal skins, bones and feathers. They were often painted using bright colors. There are archeological miniature maskettes made of walrus ivory, coming from early Paleo-Eskimo and from early Dorset culture period. Despite some similarities in the cultures of the Eskimo peoples, their cultural diversity makes it hard to generalise how Eskimos and Inuit used masks.

From Mask to Icon: Transformation in the Arctic nbsp;By . Mousalimas Published by Holy Cross Orthodox Press. Who knew that Russian Orthodoxy existed in the remote, icy villages of Alaska since the early 19th century? A book by Anthropologist and Theologist . entitled Mask to Icon, claims that Alaskan natives not only made a transition to Russian Orthodoxy but that their transition is to be understood as an indigenous movement. nbsp; Dr. Mousalimas claims that the first Russian parish priests that arrived in some of these remote areas encountered.

Unfreezing the Arctic draws on historical records from nearly 20 different archives in the US and Canada, extensive ethnographic fieldwork, time spent living in Inuvik, Northwest Territories, and private collections from field scientists who worked in the western Arctic.

In a marvelous combination of history and anthropology, together with his scholarly dedication to Greek patristics, S. A. Mousalimas in his book, From Mask to Icon, emphasizes the transition to Russian Orthodoxy, as an indigenous movement among the native Alaskan people. The study con-centrates particularly on the Aleut and Alutiiq nations, for whom decades of evidence from diverse sources is available consistently to substantiate the author's premise, that this religion became these people's own. The work indicates how the ingrafting took place. The book is a significant contribution not only to the history of these Alaskan nations, but also to missiology in general.