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Religious Experience in Earliest Christianity: A Missing Dimension in New Testament Study ePub download

by Luke Timothy Johnson

  • Author: Luke Timothy Johnson
  • ISBN: 0800631293
  • ISBN13: 978-0800631291
  • ePub: 1266 kb | FB2: 1680 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Bible Study & Reference
  • Publisher: Fortress Press (April 1, 1998)
  • Pages: 224
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 312
  • Format: mbr lrf lit docx
Religious Experience in Earliest Christianity: A Missing Dimension in New Testament Study ePub download

This recent book, 'Religious Experience in Early Christianity: A Missing Dimension in. .

This recent book, 'Religious Experience in Early Christianity: A Missing Dimension in New Testament Studies', shows much of the way he thinks and some of what he considers important in Christianity. Combining trenchant criticism with careful analysis, Luke Johnson calls for a radically new direction in New Testament studies, one that can change the way we view the entire phenomenon of early Christianity. Johnson explores three main topics: baptism (ritual imprinting), glossolalia (speaking in tongues) and eucharist (communal meals).

Luke Timothy Johnson is an American New Testament scholar and historian of early Christianity

Luke Timothy Johnson is an American New Testament scholar and historian of early Christianity. He is the Robert W. Woodruff Professor of New Testament and Christian Origins at Candler School of Theology and a Senior Fellow at the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory University.

Luke Timothy Johnson (born November 20, 1943) is an American New Testament scholar and historian of early Christianity

Luke Timothy Johnson (born November 20, 1943) is an American New Testament scholar and historian of early Christianity.

Luke Johnson here issues a provocative call for a radically new direction in New Testament studies that can change the way we have viewed the entire phenomenon of early Christianity. ISBN13: 9780800631291. Release Date: September 2003.

Luke Johnson here issues a provocative call for a radically new direction in New Testament studies that can change the way we have viewed the entire phenomenon of early Christianity

Luke Johnson here issues a provocative call for a radically new direction in New Testament studies that can change the way we have viewed the entire phenomenon of early Christianity. Johnson is convinced that the dominant ways of studying early Christianity tend to miss its specifically religious character, because of a disjunction between formal religion and "popular" religion. He proposes in this book, by means of three case studies—baptism, glossolalia, and meals—to show how a more wholistic, phenomenological approach can be made.

Combining trenchant criticism with careful analysis, Luke Timothy Johnson in Religous Experience in Earliest ChristianityThis book is an excellant primer for those who want to study the experiential dimensions of the early Christian faith, as well a.

Combining trenchant criticism with careful analysis, Luke Timothy Johnson in Religous Experience in Earliest ChristianityThis book is an excellant primer for those who want to study the experiential dimensions of the early Christian faith, as well as look into the experiential nature of their faith, today in the modern world. Here, as in all his works, Johnson combines exeptional intellectual acumen, with exhaustive scholarship which serve to illyuminate the past as well as the present.

Pastor Steve Waldron, New Life of Albany - Albany, G. Prophet Muhammad found in the Old Testament (shocking, shocking) - Продолжительность: 26:22 Christian Media Productions.

By Luke Timothy Johnson. Minneapolis: Augsburg Fortress, 1998.

Luke Johnson here issues a provocative call for a radically new direction in New Testament studies that can change the . Johnson concludes that there is still much to be learned about early Christianity as a religion, if we can find a way to get at the category of real experience. Johnson is convinced that the dominant ways of studying early Christianity tend to miss its specifically religious character, because of a disjunction between formal religion and popular religion.

A Missing Dimension in New Testament Studies. By Luke Timothy J ohnson. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1998.

New Testament - Science topic. Explore the latest publications in New Testament, and find New Testament experts. Publications (4,213). An American Bible: A History of the Good Book in the United States, 1777-1880. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1999. ix + 252 pp. Figures, maps, appendices, notes, bibliography, and index. A Missing Dimension in New Testament Studies. isbn 0 3. Paper 1. 9.

In three fascinating probes of early Christianity - examining baptism, speaking in tongues, and meals in common - Johnson illustrates how a more wholistic approach opens up the world of healings and religious power, of ecstasy and spire - in short, the religious experience of real persons. Early Christian texts, he finds, reflect lives caught up in and defined by a power not in their control but engendered instead by the crucified and raised Messiah Jesus.
Burisi
In this compact essay, Luke Timothy Johnson argues that a phenomenological approach to the history of earliest Christianity, taking note of the religious experience of its adherents, can offer new insights to complement, and in some cases challenge, those of the historical-critical approach that has dominated New Testament studies for the last century. Taking issue with many of the presuppositions of historical-critical method--especially its tendency to limit historical reality to textuality and its penchant for a "divide and conquer" mentality with regard to the diversity of earliest Christian movements--Johnson suggests a fresh view based on the insights of religious studies scholarship in what is often called the "phenomenology of religions" (loosely, the old Chicago School, as opposed to the various social-scientifically oriented approaches that have been in the ascendancy more recently). However, Johnson is not prepared to grant this methodology carte-blanche, either--much of the book is taken up with his criticism of Chicago's Jonathan Z. Smith, who, while emerging from a Chicago-style phenomenological background, has (in Johnson's view) used his prodigious learning in the history of religions to question the authenticity of religious experience itself. Johnson, by contrast, wishes to steer a middle path--avoiding both the "crypto-theological" approach of an Eliade, which seems to predicate that the religious experience was necessarily the experience of real "something" outside of human subjectivity, and the reductionist approaches of both Smith and the historical-critical scholars, who in their eagerness to remain scientific and historical refuse even to acknowledge the experience of human subjects as a legitimate concern for religion scholarship.

It must be said that Johnson's essay is only partially successful. The first two chapters, in which he lays out the contours of his theoretical stance, are frequently riveting, and should expand the audience for this book well beyond those whose interests are in early Christianity to anyone with an interest in religious studies methodology and theory.

The chapter "Ritual Imprinting and the Politics of Perfection," dealing with the experience of primitive Christian baptism and initiation, brilliantly situates it in the context of late Roman religiosity--the conflicts dealt with in the letters to the Galatians and to the Colossians are fruitfully interpreted in light of cultural expectations as to initiation through various "levels" of enlightenment and mystagogy, expectations which may have run afoul of Pauline Christianity and its emphasis on being baptized once for all into the death of Christ Jesus. The next chapter, "Glossolalia and the Embarrassments of Experience," includes a very good overview of the confused nature of the New Testament sources on primitive Christian glossolalia, and comparisons to recent psychological studies on the experience in modern contexts. However, some of Johnson's conclusions here seem much more speculative--his linking of Paul's ambivalence toward glossolalia and toward women speaking in the assembly with concerns about sexuality and gender politics in the Hellenistic world draws substantially on the work of contemporary feminist theologians and on studies (like Lewis's Ecstatic Religion) that are only tangentially related to Christian glossolalia, and for that reason is less persuasive than much of what Johnson has to say in the previous chapter, where the sources are more grounded in scholarship specifically about the cultural milieu.

Ironically, the chapter which ought to have been the centerpiece of the book, "Meals are Where the Magic Is" (about the Christian agape and Eucharistic meals), is actually the least interesting. The problem here is that Johnson seems to abandon his program of dealing with experience and to retreat into ideas--he says a great deal about what the Eucharist meant, at the level of ideas and symbols, to earliest Christians, but not much about the actual religious experience that attended on Christian and other sacred meals in late antiquity.

Johnson's wide reading is impressively on display throughout the thoroughly-footnoted volume. I found myself repeatedly remarking on interesting lines of study suggested by his notes. There is much to be learned in these pages, even if they are ultimately more revelatory of disagreements over method and theory within religious studies than they are of the experiential world of the first Christians at what became their chief act of worship.
Onnell
Not for those challenged by scholarly vocabulary and arcane philosophical/phenomenological concepts, but I found it exceptionally thought-provoking and useful - wish I'd read it ten years ago. Used it as a primary resource for a pastors' retreat, and find it to be very helpful in my continuing consideration of the current reformation currents in Christianity.

A great preliminary foray, looking to explore more.
Corgustari
Johnson's exploration fulfills his invitation to readers to see earliest Christian experience afresh. The view effects living contemporary experience with and for the Risen One.
Velan
good
Lavivan
I ordered this as supplimentary reading for a religion class so it was not just a quick read through.
I'm sure it will turn out to be what I needed.
Authis
I am fortunate to have been able to have Luke Timothy Johnson as one of my professors when I was studying religious studies at Indiana University in the early 1980s. He has since moved on to Emory University, which is definitely I.U.'s loss. Johnson has been one of the more prolific and studied historian/theologians of this generation. This recent book, 'Religious Experience in Early Christianity: A Missing Dimension in New Testament Studies', shows much of the way he thinks and some of what he considers important in Christianity. 'Combining trenchant criticism with careful analysis, Luke Johnson calls for a radically new direction in New Testament studies, one that can change the way we view the entire phenomenon of early Christianity.'
Johnson explores three main topics: baptism (ritual imprinting), glossolalia (speaking in tongues) and eucharist (communal meals). This book grew out of the 1997 Stone Lectures at Princeton Theological Seminary, and argues the need for a phenomenological approach to the examination of religious experience. 'This is neither history in the strict sense of the term, nor is it theology. That's the whole point: we need a new way of looking in order to see what we can't otherwise see.'
Johnson argues that there has been a comfortable agreement between scholars and clerics toward a more sanitary, orderly, control-able way of examining religious phenomena, which is only natural considering, particularly in Western society, medieval and modern scholarship grew out of the clerical ranks. The 'history' of early Christianity has thus been a history primarily built of ideas and institutions rather than experiences, which tend to be too subjective.
Perhaps the most remarkable chapter in this text is the one on Glossolalia and the Embarrassments of Experience. Speaking in tongues is something that fringe groups do, most scholars, clerics, and lay Christians believe (except for those in denominations which still regard this as a valid practise). Johnson, coming out of a Roman Catholic background, would be one of the last people one would expect to deal with this subject.
Even at Pentecost, speaking in tongues divided the crowd. Since then, glossolalia has been singled out as either the supreme criterion for the direct action of the Holy Spirit in Christian lives or the supreme example of how enthusiasm is a bad thing for Christian piety.
Part of the problem with analyzing this phenomenon is that there is no consistent form, either physically, psychologically, and gets into areas that certainly go against modern, more 'scientific and objective' ideas. Johnson does not try, with this topic or with baptism and eucharistic experiences, to formulate a definitive, 'this-must-be-it' way of thinking or viewing these phenomena, but rather strives to show the real experience in the real lives of early Christians as best as can be reconstructed. This is a fascinating text.
Brightcaster
A clear, concise, much-needed perspective on the beginnings of Christianity. Critiques the limitations of the Theology perspective and the Historical Sociopolitical perspective, and explains why scholars are averse to looking at the origins of Christianity from the point of view of religious experiencing.
Central chapters cover glossalia and especially sacred meals, looking for the kind of experiencing that was common to the Mystery Religions and Jewish initiation. The convenient footnotes have valuable references to the books he praises and critiques. Ends with a call to start looking for religious experiencing as the main cause of Christianity.
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