» » Lord Jesus Christ: Devotion to Jesus in Earliest Christianity

Lord Jesus Christ: Devotion to Jesus in Earliest Christianity ePub download

by Larry W. Hurtado

  • Author: Larry W. Hurtado
  • ISBN: 0802831672
  • ISBN13: 978-0802831675
  • ePub: 1139 kb | FB2: 1641 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Bible Study & Reference
  • Publisher: Eerdmans; Pbk. Ed edition (September 14, 2005)
  • Rating: 4.6/5
  • Votes: 336
  • Format: lrf azw rtf mbr
Lord Jesus Christ: Devotion to Jesus in Earliest Christianity ePub download

Lord Jesus Christ" is a monumental work on earliest Christian devotion to Jesus, sure to replace Wilhelm Bousset's "Kyrios Christos" (1913) as the standard work on the subject.

Lord Jesus Christ" is a monumental work on earliest Christian devotion to Jesus, sure to replace Wilhelm Bousset's "Kyrios Christos" (1913) as the standard work on the subject. Larry Hurtado, widely respected for his previous contributions to the study of the New Testament and Christian origins, offers the best view to date of how the first Christians saw and reverenced Jesus as divine. In assembling this compelling picture, Hurtado draws on a wide body of ancient sources, from Scripture and the writings of such figures as Ignatius of Antioch and Justin to apocryphal.

Jesus Christ – Unknown to Christianity does this! There has never been a book like it! Bringing. Jesus Christ - History of doctrines - Early church, ca. 30-600. 2. Jesus Christ - Cul. Beginning English Conversation. 78 Pages·2012·835 KB·39,411 Downloads. Welcome to the English Conversation Class sponsored by the Church of Jesus Christ We teach Beginning Eng. Jesus in his Jewish context. Paul the Apostle of Jesus Christ: His Life and Works, His Epistles and Teachings. 11 MB·10,156 Downloads·New! In 1845, F. C. Baur published Paul the Apostle of Jesus Christ, in which he presented his theory.

The indisputable centrality of the figure of Jesus in early Christian devotion is the premise for this book, and my aim is to offer a new historical description and analysis of this remarkable phenomenon. Indeed, the key distinguishing feature of the early Christian circles was the prominent place of Jesus Christ in their religious thought and practice.

Jesus Books 427 Rumors 428 Secret Mark 433 Fragments 437 The Egerton Manuscript 440 Gospel of Peter 441 Infancy Gospels 447 Protevangelium of. .

Jesus Books 427 Rumors 428 Secret Mark 433 Fragments 437 The Egerton Manuscript 440 Gospel of Peter 441 Infancy Gospels 447 Protevangelium of James 447 Infancy Gospel of Thomas 449 Gospel of Thomas 452 A Jesus Book 454 Literary Character 455 Secret Knowledge 458. x Contents. The indisputable centrality of the figure of Jesus in early Christian devotion is. the premise for this book, and my aim is to offer a new historical description and analysis of this remarkable phenomenon.

Lord Jesus Christ book. This outstanding book provides an in-depth historical study of the place of Jesus in the religious life, beliefs, and worship of Christians from the beginnings of the Christian movement down to the late second century.

Lord Jesus Christ: Devotion to Jesus in Earliest Christianity. How on Earth did Jesus Become a God? Historical Questions about Earliest Devotion to Jesus. The Earliest Christian Artifacts: Manuscripts and Christian.

Journal of Early Christian Studies 1. (2004) 537-541 Larry Hurtado's big new book, Lord Jesus Christ, takes as it.On the contrary, urges Hurtado, devotion to Jesus as a very elevated figure traces back to the very earliest post-resurrection community in Jerusalem. (2004) 537-541 Larry Hurtado's big new book, Lord Jesus Christ, takes as it prototype and anti-type Wilhelm Bousset's 1913 classic, Kyrios Christos (1-26). Hurtado promises to concentrate not on texts or on doctrines so much as on early Christian practices, specifically on those that attest to "devotion to Jesus.

Published in The Southwestern Journal of Theology 4. (2004), 99-100. Larry Hurtado, professor of New Testament at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, is well known for his many fine contributions to scholarship, and this volume is no exception. Hurtado’s aim in this book is to offer a full-scale analysis of the origin, development, and diversification of devotion to Christ in the crucial first two centuries of the Christian movement (ca.

This outstanding book provides an in-depth historical study of the place of Jesus in the religious life, beliefs, and worship of Christians from the beginnings of the Christian movement down to the late second century.Lord Jesus Christ is a monumental work on earliest Christian devotion to Jesus, sure to replace Wilhelm Bousset’s Kyrios Christos (1913) as the standard work on the subject. Larry Hurtado, widely respected for his previous contributions to the study of the New Testament and Christian origins, offers the best view to date of how the first Christians saw and reverenced Jesus as divine. In assembling this compelling picture, Hurtado draws on a wide body of ancient sources, from Scripture and the writings of such figures as Ignatius of Antioch and Justin to apocryphal texts such as the Gospel of Thomas and the Gospel of Truth. Hurtado considers such themes as early beliefs about Jesus’ divine status and significance, but he also explores telling devotional practices of the time, including prayer and worship, the use of Jesus’ name in exorcism, baptism and healing, ritual invocation of Jesus as “Lord,” martyrdom, and lesser-known phenomena such as prayer postures and the curious scribal practice known today as the nomina sacra. The revealing portrait that emerges from Hurtado’s comprehensive study yields definitive answers to questions like these: How important was this formative period to later Christian tradition? When did the divinization of Jesus first occur? Was early Christianity influenced by neighboring religions? How did the idea of Jesus’ divinity change old views of God? And why did the powerful dynamics of early beliefs and practices encourage people to make the costly move of becoming a Christian? Boasting an unprecedented breadth and depth of coverage — the book speaks authoritatively on everything from early Christian history to themes in biblical studies to New Testament Christology — Hurtado’s Lord Jesus Christ is at once significant enough that a wide range of scholars will want to read it and accessible enough that general readers interested at all in Christian origins will also profit greatly from it.
Voodoosida
At 653 pages of text, this is Dr. Larry W. Hurtado's magnum opus in more ways than one. This book covers "devotion to Jesus" in the first two centuries of Christianity. More specifically, that's from 30 CE to 170 CE. This contrasts with his seminal book (only 168 pages) published earlier in his career, One God, One Lord: Early Christian Devotion and Ancient Jewish Monotheism, which tracked the same subject but with a laser-like focus on the first twenty years of Christianity (30 CE to 50 CE).

What Hurtado calls "devotion to Jesus" is, generally speaking, what others might call Christology. However, this is more than just a semantic difference. Hurtado writes more as an historian than as a theologian. This makes his work on early Christianity particularly innovative and informative. Hurtado focuses on the devotional practices of early Christians, not just their stated or inferred beliefs. The absence of constant theologizing gives his work a fresh feel. His writing style also employs a vast English vocabulary which allows him to phrase his findings in ways that don't carry sectarian connotations.

The structure of the book is that Hurtado moves progressively through the period covered by patiently sifting through the documents one sub-period at a time: Paul's letters, Q, the canonical gospels, other gospels, and so on. This is what makes the book so long, but it is never tedious. Hurtado generally embraces the views of mainstream scholarship on such issues as "only seven of Paul's letters being genuine." Yet, he let's the evidence speak for itself - which means that Jesus is venerated early and greatly in history. This puts to flight any liberal notions that Jesus was a good man who, through the passage of time and the process of syncretism with pagan myths of the day, was eventually regarded as holding godlike status long after his crucifixion by Roman authorities. Hurtado forcefully shows that Jesus was venerated to godlike status by Jews...and almost immediately after his crucifixion. Hurtado never gets it down to "three days after," but he says what amounts to the same thing in every other possible way.

There are two critical issues of the first two centuries that Hurtado does not cover, which was disappointing for me. One was the crisis that some devotees to Jesus must have gone through when the eschatological time frame was exceeded. That is, Jesus had promised to return before that generation passed away. What happened in the waning days of that generation? The other was the "Gentilization" of the church, which probably occurred around the same time. The second-century church fathers were Gentiles but the first-century church leadership was all in the hands of devout Jews (the twelve apostles, Paul, and others such as Barnabas, Apollos, Priscilla, and Aquila). What was happening in that transition period? These two issues have great bearing on devotion to Jesus and deserve to be addressed in historical studies.

If you are going to read only one book of Hurtado's, I suggest it be How on Earth Did Jesus Become a God?: Historical Questions about Earliest Devotion to Jesus. It focuses on the key point of Hurtado's career-long research (that Jesus was reverenced quickly, greatly, and Jewishly), is accessibly written (the material began as a series of lectures to non-specialists), and is accessibly priced. However, if you are someone who is devoted to Christ and have the time to learn more about the history of days immediately after His resurrection, then just one Hurtado book is not enough (It certainly wasn't for me). And you will certainly want to absorb his magnum opus.
Ienekan
The study of early Christology used to focus on the titles of Christ in the New Testament. It seemed that every book on the subject had something to say about Jesus being called Lord, Messiah, Lamb, etc. Recognizing that the study of titles can only take us so far, Larry Hurtado has focused on another area, i.e., early Christian devotional practices. His study moves beyond the rhetoric of the printed page and into the actual real life practices of the early church. He shows how Jesus was the co-recipient of worship with God in a way that the earliest believers didn't feel violated the monotheistic scruples of Second Temple Judaism. In fact, they saw devotion to Christ as obedience to God.
Zonama
while this book is "revelatory" in its concept of how Jesus was viewed in the early years after his resurrection, and thankfully so, I found it too scholarly for the layperson (like me). I was able to glean the author's insight but as is the case is with experts whose intent is to refute the "ideation" of scholars with differing views, their terminology is veiled in phraseology unique to their level of expertise in order to make their case, and rightfully so. I appreciate this book and am glad that there are authors like Mr. Hurtado who are gifted with the insight to pursue such a topic, along with N.T. Wright and others.
Quamar
We have needed this book for a long time! Larry Hurtado has given us a full scale treatment of the history of devotion to Jesus Christ. Contrary to scholars such as J.D Crossan, Hurtado shows why Paul's writings must be considered when researching the history of devotion to Christ. He persuasively demonstrates that in Paul's writings as well as the later Gospel traditions, Jesus was revered. He even shows where Paul puts Jesus right up there with God (he calls this a binitarian understanding of God). He says that this is a radical new envisioning of Jewish monotheism and that it cannot be traced back to any polytheistic Gentile ideas.

Hurtado also shows how the Gospels and Q also reveal the church's early devotion to Jesus.

The book concludes with a discussion of Jesus in later noncanonical writings such as the Gospel of Thomas and in the writings of the early church fathers.

The basic thesis of the book is that the church worshipped Jesus as divine from the very beginning of Christianity. Hurtado dialogues with Jesus scholars such as Martin Hengel, John Kloppenborg, J.D Crossan, and James D.G Dunn, and he always treats their work with the utmost respect while also explaining why he occasionally must diverge from their viewpoints.

The last time a major study of Jesus worship was written was way back in 1913, so this book is long overdue. Hurtado is a moderately conservative guide through the twists and turns of early Christian literature, and his conclusions are well thought out and deserve to be considered.
Molace
Hurtado blows the claims of both Bousset and Dan Brown out of the water where they claim that the Deity of Christ was a late invention. Hurtado presents the strongest evidence yet that the worship of Jesus as God goes back before Paul's conversion, to the very earliest church. Even before they can spell out their belief in writing, Hurtado argues that we can see what the early church believed about Jesus by their actions. A must-read for anyone in doubt about whether the earliest Christians believed that Jesus is God.
Bu
Surprisingly easy to read, yet Hurtado presents his material "in depth" and with a meditatve quality not found in many scholarly works. This is being read in a book discussion group and all wholeheartedly agree with this statement.
E-Books Related to Lord Jesus Christ: Devotion to Jesus in Earliest Christianity: