» » JPS Hebrew-English Tanakh: The Holy Scripture with the JPS Translation (Hebrew and English Edition)

JPS Hebrew-English Tanakh: The Holy Scripture with the JPS Translation (Hebrew and English Edition) ePub download

by Jewish Publication Society,J. P. S.

  • Author: Jewish Publication Society,J. P. S.
  • ISBN: 956835140X
  • ISBN13: 978-9568351403
  • ePub: 1551 kb | FB2: 1149 kb
  • Language: Hebrew English
  • Category: Bible Study & Reference
  • Publisher: HN Publishing (April 2005)
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 650
  • Format: lrf rtf doc txt
JPS Hebrew-English Tanakh: The Holy Scripture with the JPS Translation (Hebrew and English Edition) ePub download

This is NOT the same "JPS Hebrew-English Tanakh" as the one published by JPS (ISBN 0827606567). Rather, this CD includes the translation published by the JPS in 1917. That translation is now in the public domain and can be found online for free

This is NOT the same "JPS Hebrew-English Tanakh" as the one published by JPS (ISBN 0827606567). That translation is now in the public domain and can be found online for free. Furthermore, not all versions of the Hebrew Bible are the same, and the one on this CD is of unknown provenance. Who knows where this "publisher" got what it claims to be the Bible text? Who can vouch for the text's accuracy and reliability as the actual words of the Bible (without scribal or typographical errors)?

Tanakh, the Holy Scriptures: The New JPS According to the Traditional Hebrew Text.

96 MB·17,753 Downloads. the indicated biblical passage, Hebrew and English side-by side. This Tanakh has also been enabled. Tanakh, the Holy Scriptures: The New JPS According to the Traditional Hebrew Text. 1,668 Pages·1985·157. 95 MB·417 Downloads·New!. The Guhyagarbha Tantra : Secret Essence Definitive Nature Just As It Is. 2011·37. He has tested these concepts with 200. Nuclear Physics: Exploring the Heart of Matter.

Jewish translations often reflect traditional Jewish exegesis of the Bible; all such translations eschew the Christological interpretations present in many non-Jewish translations.

English translation of the entire Tanakh (Tanach) with Rashi's . Browse by Book: Torah - The Pentateuch. Ketuvim - Scriptures.

Browse by Book: Torah - The Pentateuch. Bereishit - Genesis Shemot - Exodus Vayikra - Leviticus Bamidbar - Numbers Devarim - Deuteronomy.

Jewish Written Law. The Talmud. Jewish Oral Law. The Koran. References to Jews in the Koran. Though the terms "Bible" and "Old Testament" are commonly used by non-Jews to describe Judaism's scriptures, the appropriate term is "Tanach," which is derived as an acronym from the Hebrew letters of its three components: Torah, Nevi'im and Ketuvim.

The JPS Hebrew-English TANAKH features the oldest-known complete Hebrew version of the Holy Scriptures, side by side with JPS's renowned English translation. The Hebrew text of this TANAKH is based on the famed Leningrad Codex, the Masoretic text traceable to Aaron Ben Moses ben-Asher, . 30 .

JPS Hebrew-English TANAKH book. The 'JPS Hebrew-English TANAKH' features the oldest-known complete Hebrew version of the Holy Scriptures, side by side with JPS’s renowned English translation.

Regarded throughout the English-speaking world as the standard English translation of the Holy Scriptures, the . Jewish Books: 18 Essential Texts Every Jew Should Read.

Regarded throughout the English-speaking world as the standard English translation of the Holy Scriptures, the JPS TANAKH has been acclaimed.

Does such a translation exist?

The sacred task of translating the Word of God, as revealed to Israel through lawgiver, prophet, psalmist, and sage, began at an early date. According to an ancient rabbinic interpretation, Joshua had the Torah engraved upon the stones of the altar (Joshua 8:32) not in the original Hebrew alone, but in all the languages of mankind, which were held to be seventy, in order that all men might become acquainted with the words of the Scriptures. This statement, with its universalistic tendency, is, of course, a reflex of later times, when the Hebrew Scriptures had become a subject of curiosity and perhaps also of anxiety to the pagan or semi-pagan world. While this tradition contains an element of truth, it is certain that the primary object of translating the Bible was to minister to a need nearer home. Upon the establishment of the Second Commonwealth under Ezra and Nehemiah, it became imperative to make the Torah of God 'distinct and giving sense' through the means of interpretation (Nehemiah 8:8 and 13:24), that the Word of God might be understood by all the people. The Rabbis perceived in this activity of the first generation of the Sopherim the origin of the Aramaic translation known as the Targum, first made orally and afterwards committed to writing, which was necessitated by the fact that Israel had forgotten the sacred language, and spoke the idiom current in a large part of western Asia. All this, however, is veiled in obscurity, as is the whole inner history of the Jews during the Persian rule. The historic necessity for translation was repeated with all the great changes in Israel's career. It is enough to point to the Septuagint, or the Greek translation of the Scriptures, the product of Israel's contact with the Hellenistic civilization dominating the world at that time; to the Arabic translation by the Gaon Saadya, when the great majority of the Jewish people came under the sceptre of Mohammedan rulers; and to the German translation by Mendelssohn and his school, at the dawn of a new epoch, which brought the Jews in Europe, most of whom spoke a German dialect, into closer contact with their neighbours. These translations are all historical products intimately connected with Israel's wanderings among the nations and with the great events of mankind in general. Ancient and continuous as this task of translation was, it would be a mistake to think that there were no misgivings about it. At least it is certain that opinions were divided as to the desirability of such undertakings. While Philo and his Alexandrian coreligionists looked upon the translation of the Seventy as a work of inspired men, the Palestinian Rabbis subsequently considered the day on which the Septuagint was completed as one of the most unfortunate in Israel's history, seeing that the Torah could never be adequately translated. And there are indications enough that the consequences of such translations were not all of a desirable nature. However, in view of the eagerness with which they were undertaken almost in every land and in every great epoch of the world's history, it is evident that the people at large approved of such translations, thinking them to be a heave-offering to the Lord of each newly acquired vernacular adopted in the course of the ever-changing conditions of history, and in particular a tribute to the beauty of Japheth dwelling in the spiritual tents of Israel. The greatest change in the life of Israel during the last two generations was his renewed acquaintance with English-speaking civilization. Out of a handful of immigrants from Central Europe and the East who saw the shores of the New World, or even of England and her colonies, we have grown under Providence both in numbers and in importance, so that we constitute now the greatest section of Israel living in a single country
Andromajurus
The description for this disc doesn't mention that it's the antique 1917 edition of the JPS Tanakh, which is the King James version with a little tweaking to fix up verse numbering differences and the odd word or two. One can only conclude that the publisher's aim was to gull the public into thinking that it's the current JPS translation, especially when they list a recent publication date and include a current "review" telling us what a great translation it is. This version of the text is in the public domain and can be easily found online, in both Hebrew and the 1917 JPS translation. Don't waste your money.
Tehn
The Jewish Publication Society (JPS) did NOT produce this CD, according to the JPS publishing director, Carol Hupping (personal communication, 12/14/05).

This is NOT the same "JPS Hebrew-English Tanakh" as the one published by JPS (ISBN 0827606567).

Rather, this CD includes the translation published by the JPS in 1917. That translation is now in the public domain and can be found online for free.

Furthermore, not all versions of the Hebrew Bible are the same, and the one on this CD is of unknown provenance. Who knows where this "publisher" got what it claims to be the Bible text? Who can vouch for the text's accuracy and reliability as the actual words of the Bible (without scribal or typographical errors)?

In contrast, JPS itself has produced a newer translation (second edition, 1999), which is in modern English and draws upon the advances in biblical scholarship since 1917. It has also published that newer translation together with a Hebrew text whose editing is carefully documented. It titled that edition the "JPS Hebrew-English Tanakh."

That edition is available in three electronic versions, produced by Varda Books under license from JPS. Again, that is NOT what's on this CD. Don't be misled by the title.
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