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An Exegetical Commentary: Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi ePub download

by Eugene H. Merrill

  • Author: Eugene H. Merrill
  • ISBN: 0802492665
  • ISBN13: 978-0802492661
  • ePub: 1316 kb | FB2: 1150 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Bible Study & Reference
  • Publisher: Moody Pub; First Edition edition (March 1, 1994)
  • Pages: 493
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 552
  • Format: mbr lrf azw docx
An Exegetical Commentary: Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi ePub download

Merrill has published ten books, contributed to several other collaborative projects, served as a translator in three biblical text projects, and written nearly 200 .

Merrill has published ten books, contributed to several other collaborative projects, served as a translator in three biblical text projects, and written nearly 200 scholarly articles, mostly for Bibliotheca Sacra. Significant titles include: Qumran and Predestination: A Theological Study of the Thanksgiving Hymns (1975). Genesis Debate (1986). The Old Testament Explorer: Discovering the Essence, Background, and Meaning of Every Book in the Old Testament (2001). Die Geschichte Israels: Ein Königreich Von Priestern (2001).

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Eugene Merrill locates the books of Zechariah and Haggai around 515 BC But the book of Malachi is not quite as easy to nail down. After an interesting discussion, Merrill concludes that the book was probably written between 480-470 BC, before the reforms of Ezra and Nehemiah

Eugene Merrill locates the books of Zechariah and Haggai around 515 BC But the book of Malachi is not quite as easy to nail down. After an interesting discussion, Merrill concludes that the book was probably written between 480-470 BC, before the reforms of Ezra and Nehemiah. This can be contended, especially by those who have dogmatic issues with Malachi being able to predict the future destruction of Edom (312 BC). But the contents of the book itself seems to fit a time prior to the arrival of Ezra.

The books of Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi-composed as they were in. .

The books of Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi-composed as they were in the postexilic period of Israel’s history-were intended, among other purposes, to bring hope to a people whose national and even personal lives had been shattered by the Babylonian destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple and the subsequent deportation of much of the Jewish population. Instead, it has turned into an opportunity to be reminded in a fresh way of the perfection of God’s eternal purposes.

Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi book.

Pages: 404 pages Publisher: Biblical Studies Press Published: 2003 ISBN-10: 0737500174 ISBN-13: 9780737500172.

Eugene H. Merrill (PhD, Bob Jones University; PhD, Columbia University) is distinguished professor of Old Testament studies at Dallas Theological Seminary in Dallas, Texas, where he has taught since 1975. He is also distinguished professor of Old Testament interpretation at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.

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Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi preached to audiences who were jaded by the lack of relevance of organized religion to their daily .

Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi preached to audiences who were jaded by the lack of relevance of organized religion to their daily economic and social life.

The books of Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi are particularly relevant and beneficial to modern Christians, for they can see in them the covenant faithfulness of God to His ancient people - a faithfulness exhibited in the coming of Jesus Christ. This exegetical commentary was written to confront the reader with the power and presence of the God of Israel. In a day of profound discouragement and misplaced priorities following the return of the Jews from Babylonian exile, the prophet Haggai sounded a clarion call of rebuke, exhortation, and encouragement to his contemporaries. They had begun to rebuild their own homes and businesses but had been derelict in tending to the construction of the temple and focusing on the Lord. The message of Haggai has an abiding relevance for all who fail to seek first the Kingdom of God and His righteousness. Zechariah not only shared Haggai's burden about the inertia of the postexilic community, but by vision and dream saw the unfolding of Divine purpose for all of God's people. Rich in apocalyptic imagery and packed with messianic prediction and allusion, Zechariah's writings became a favorite of the New Testament evangelists and apostles. No Minor Prophet excels Zechariah in the clarity and triumph by which he looks to the culmination of God's program of redemption. The burden of this, the last of the Old Testament prophets, was the glaring inconcinnity between the identity of the Jewish community as the people of God and the living out of all that this required of them. Theirs was not the problem of rebuilding the Temple and holy city, for that had long been done by Malachi's day; rather, it was the issue of holy living and holy service in the aftermath of all the external accomplishments. Malachi still speaks to the modern world about the need to bring performance into line with profession. His message is current, especially in light of the coming of the One of whom the prophet so eloquently spoke.
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