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Genesis: Interpretation: A Bible Commentary for Teaching and Preaching ePub download

by Walter Brueggemann

  • Author: Walter Brueggemann
  • ISBN: 0664234372
  • ISBN13: 978-0664234379
  • ePub: 1896 kb | FB2: 1412 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Bible Study & Reference
  • Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press; 1 edition (January 25, 2010)
  • Pages: 400
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 148
  • Format: mobi mbr docx lrf
Genesis: Interpretation: A Bible Commentary for Teaching and Preaching ePub download

Brueggemann's impressive perspective illuminates the study of the first book of the Bible

Brueggemann's impressive perspective illuminates the study of the first book of the Bible. Planned and written specifically for teaching and preaching needs.

It is the faith declarations that have helped me the most, since I have about 10 books of Bible promises.

Dietary Reference Intakes. 306 Pages·2001·886 KB·21,601 Downloads·New! Since 1994, the Institute of Medicine's Food and Nutrition Board has been involved in developing. It is the faith declarations that have helped me the most, since I have about 10 books of Bible promises.

The Interpretation series from Westminster John Knox Press is clearly established as a rich source for teaching and preaching. Brueggemann's impressive perspective illuminates the study of the first book of the Bible. Author: Terence E. Fretheim. Rhodes Professor of Old Testament Emeritus at Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary. The Interpretation series is an invaluable resource for any leader or scholar interested in interpreting the biblical text to the broader church.

Planned and written specifically for teaching and preaching needs, this critically acclaimed biblical .

Primary for Brueggemann is the concept of 'calling' in the book of Genesis

The risk of such an undertaking is easy to see, but the rewards are equally as great, and warrant any risk. Thus, one can expect a great deal of interpretation of the text, and at times it may be controversial. Primary for Brueggemann is the concept of 'calling' in the book of Genesis. This is Brueggemann's 'center' in interpreting the book and it is distilled from the belief that 'God calls the worlds into being' and 'God calls us into the church'.

Teachers, preachers, and all serious students of the Bible will find here an. .

Teachers, preachers, and all serious students of the Bible will find here an interpretation that takes serious hermeneutical responsibility for the contemporary meaning and significance of the biblical text.

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In his clear and readable, style Walter Brueggemann presents Genesis as a single book set within the context of the whole of biblical revelation

In his clear and readable, style Walter Brueggemann presents Genesis as a single book set within the context of the whole of biblical revelation. He sees his task as bringing the text close to the faith and ministry of the church. He interprets Genesis as a proclamation of God's decisive dealing with creation rather than as history of myth.

Format Paperback 400 pages. About Walter Brueggemann. Walter Brueggemann is William Marcellus McPheeters Professor Emeritus of Old Testament at Columbia Theological Seminary in Decatur, Georgia

In his clear and readable, style Walter Brueggemann presents Genesis as a single book set within the context of the whole of biblical revelation. He sees his task as bringing the text close to the faith and ministry of the church. He interprets Genesis as a proclamation of God's decisive dealing with creation rather than as history of myth. Brueggemann's impressive perspective illuminates the study of the first book of the Bible.

Interpretation: A Bible Commentary for Teaching and Preaching is a distinctive resource for those who interpret the Bible in the church. Planned and written specifically for teaching and preaching needs, this critically acclaimed biblical commentary is a major contribution to scholarship and ministry.

OTANO
Opens insight upon insight in scripture and meaning of text and most importantly, in me. I read it with a Bible beside me as he references many passages in old and new testaments to show the continuity of revealed truth. Walter Brueggemann has been called by many well known biblical scholars as their favorite old testament scholar. I have also read his book in this series on 1and 2 Samuel. Also, enlightening. Finally, his short book on The Message of the Psalms is pure poetry. These are not books that one can blow through quickly. I have used them to read, reference other passages in the Bible and put it down for a while to meditate on what has been taught. Well worth any effort on my part. Highly recommended.
Eayaroler
Although his commentary is now over 26 years old, it still speaks with a fresh voice into the situation of the modern church and society. If you read Brueggemann you should expect to receive political as well as theological insight. While I know that some can find that frustrating, I personally find it refreshingly poignant. Brueggemann does not get bogged down in a historical reading of Genesis, but reads it as a theological document. "This story is not concerned with historical data but with the strange things which happen in the heart of God that decisively affect God's creation" (74). This commentary is not a verse-by-verse commentary, but tackles narrative chunks. Because of that, it is very helpful when preparing for sermons of a thematic nature. It also is very well organized for a personalized reading through Genesis with Brueggemann's commentary as a beneficial guide.
Jerdodov
I am using this book as background reading for a Bible Study class I am leading at my church, and I find it to be just what I need to catch myself up on a subject I had not studied recently. Brueggeman's mix of rigorous academics and sincere faith provides me with much of what I need for my class and makes for an enjoyable read.
Kulwes
Firstly, I am glad I opted for a theological commentary over an exegetical for my first take at reading Genesis seriously. I cannot begin to imagine reading footnote after footnote about this particular word and this particular source and the dating the of the book of Genesis. Secondly, I am glad I did not choose a author who would try to convince of an early dating for Genesis or the historical-scientific proofs for a six day creation. I honestly didn't know where Brueggemann stood on such issues, but I was prepared to disagree with him.

It may seem obvious to those who studied Genesis in detail or who had more than a cursory reading when trying desperately to finish reading the Bible in a year, but to those of us finally coming into our studies, the names of each of these books is so important to how one studies them. As Brueggemann points out, Genesis is about the genesis of a world and a family. It is about giving a history for a people in exile. That being said, Brueggemann does get into some historical-critical discussions, but these are never the focus of his writing. He'll often mention sources that we are familiar with like J, E and P but this is usually in passing as if the reader already assumes such sources.

Genesis, according to Brueggemann, can be taken into two halves: the cosmological genesis and the anthropological genesis. The latter genesis can then be broken into four sections: the Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and Joseph cycles. Chief among them is the promise of Abraham which pervades the three remaining cycles is the also that which propels the other cycles into the book of Exodus. Brueggemann argues that we must follow the title Genesis even along to the end which is really not an ending, but really is a beginning that takes us to the Exodus story.

Brueggemann's writing style is clearly homiletical as he often gives cross-reference to the gospels or Paul, and often makes connection between the ancient communities of Genesis and how these should or shouldn't shape the Christian communities of the present. Certainly this is not a commentary that should be used on its own for research or scholarly purposes, but it is certainly a beginning place for theological interpretation of Scripture.

The new paperback editions make for affordability but lack the former durability.
Pooker
I LOVE this book. It gave me many insights into the OT.
Beautifully-written, and well-researched. A must for my library!
Zovaithug
Textbook... arrived quickly and as described.
Cia
No other commentary I have read on Genesis has caused me to spontaneously want to praise God upon reading it.
Although some of Walter Brueggemann's positions on textual integrity are a bit more liberal than I would be comfortable with (example: doubting Mosaic authorship for the book of Genesis), he nevertheless has an incredibly sound exposition of the text as it stands in its canonical form.

The exegetical insights are keen, the theological and practical implications are sharp and invigorating, and his writing style is lively and creative.

The one thing I appreciate most about Brueggemann's treatment of Genesis is that he allows the text to speak without softening its edges. When he comes across a passage that is problematic or difficult to interpret in our "civilized" Western culture, he does not excuse the Scriptures with a milder interpretation. He instead assumes the Scriptures have a reason for why they are written the way they are, and that we must grapple with these difficulties, not as problems to fix, but most likely as the entry point into our way of thinking which God wants to change and redeem.

As said in the title, this is a MUST for any expositor of the book of Genesis.
Worth the money. There are so many commentaries out there, but this one is well thought out and meaningful. I'm still working through it. Applicable for sermon prep and personal study. Author draws out insight from the text in a helpful way without being dry or too technical.
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