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The Little Red Lighthouse and the Great Gray Bridge ePub download

by Hildegarde H. Swift,Lynd Ward

  • Author: Hildegarde H. Swift,Lynd Ward
  • ISBN: 0152045716
  • ISBN13: 978-0152045715
  • ePub: 1996 kb | FB2: 1144 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Literature & Fiction
  • Publisher: HMH Books for Young Readers; First edition (August 1, 2002)
  • Pages: 64
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 990
  • Format: lit lrf docx rtf
The Little Red Lighthouse and the Great Gray Bridge ePub download

LYND WARD (1905-1985) illustrated more than two hundred books for children and adults throughout his prolific . I remember as a child feeling powerfully for the lighthouse and the ships that wrecked when its light failed

LYND WARD (1905-1985) illustrated more than two hundred books for children and adults throughout his prolific career. Winner of the Caldecott Medal for his watercolors in The Biggest Bear, Mr. Ward was also famous for his wood engravings, which are featured in museum collections throughout the United States and abroad. I remember as a child feeling powerfully for the lighthouse and the ships that wrecked when its light failed. I remember sharing its fears of being no longer needed, of being all alone, and of being unable to speak: "The little red lighthouse could neither speak nor shine. That still puts a lump in my throat to this day when I read it to children.

When the Great Gray Bridge is constructed right next to him, our .

When the Great Gray Bridge is constructed right next to him, our lighthouse finds himself dwarfed, and begins to feel that he has no purpose. But when a tug-boat gets in trouble in the fog, it turns out that the lights on The Little Red Lighthouse stood on the banks of the mighty Hudson River, guiding the boats on that massive waterway as they passed the island of Manhattan. I found Swift's story poignant and her writing lovely, and I found illustrator Lynd Ward's watercolor artwork gorgeously expressive. Because of this book, the Little Red Lighthouse (official named the Jeffrey's Hook lighthouse) was restored and can be visited by children and their families.

A little lighthouse on the Hudson River regains its pride when it finds out that it is still useful and has an important job .

A little lighthouse on the Hudson River regains its pride when it finds out that it is still useful and has an important job to d. We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you.

The Little Red Lighthouse and the Great Gray Bridge (1942) by Hildegarde Swift, illustrated by Lynd Ward. National Lighthouse Day is a day to honor the importance of lighthouses and their role in the safe passage of ships along the coasts. It is held on August 7th in remembrance of August 7, 1789 on which the . Congress created the legislation that allowed the federal government to take over responsibility for the creation and maintenance of the United States’ lighthouses. Here is a clip from our film THE LITTLE RED LIGHTHOUSE AND THE GREAT GRAY BRIDGE based on the book written by Hildegard H. Swift and illustrated by Lynd Ward.

LYND WARD (1905-1985) illustrated more than two hundred books for children and adults throughout his prolific career

LYND WARD (1905-1985) illustrated more than two hundred books for children and adults throughout his prolific career. If you need immediate assistance regarding this product or any other, please call 1-800-CHRISTIAN to speak directly with a customer service representative.

A great gray bridge grew overhead, spanning the river from shore to shore

A great gray bridge grew overhead, spanning the river from shore to shore.

Hildegarde H Swift, Lynd Ward. Lighting up readers' hearts and imaginations since it was first published in 1942.

the 1942 children's book, The Little Red Lighthouse and the Great Gray Bridge, by Hildegarde Swift ^ Swift, Hildegarde (1942). The Little Red Lighthouse and the Great Gray Bridge.

Swift, Hildegarde (1942). Lynd Ward (illustrator). Harcourt, Brace, and World.

This year, the unforgettable story of the little red lighthouse, a perennial American landmark, celebrates its sixtieth anniversary. Embraced by generations, this story of an actual lighthouse in New York City will teach children the importance of all things, big and small - and will light up reader's hearts and imaginations for years to come. About the Book Find at your local library.

On the Manhattan bank of the Hudson River, a small lighthouse--made of steel and painted bright red--proudly protects boats with his faithful beam. One day a great expanse of gray steel, which also shines a bright light into the fog and darkness, is built over it. The little red lighthouse feels insignificant and useless in comparison but soon learns that . . . small can be mighty!A portion of the sales from this book will be donated to the Jeffrey's Hook Lighthouse education and outreach programs.
Inabel
This review is about the Facsimile Edition (Harcourt, 2002) of The Little Red Lighthouse and the Great Gray Bridge, which uses the original watercolor illustrations which had never seen by the general public before this printing. It will say "Facsimile Edition" on the copyright page (back of book).

The Little Red Lighthouse and the Great Gray Bridge is one of those classics that rings with everlasting truths. Furthermore, it's about two landmarks on the Hudson River that are still there, and which anyone can see merely by Googling the George Washington Bridge or the Little Red Lighthouse (a.k.a Jeffrey's Hook Lighthouse), which still stands proudly at its feet, thanks to preservationists who acted to save it specifically because of their love for this book.

The lighthouse takes pride in its job, warning ships to stay away from the rocks at night, especially in fog or storms. A huge bridge goes up right next to it, and high above, hundreds of feet in the air, a beacon is installed atop it. The lighthouse feels that its light is no longer needed, and begins feeling depressed and isolated, but when a dense fog comes and the man fails to come and fire up its light, the lighthouse learns that the ships of the river are in great peril. The great bridge calls down to it and asks it to turn on its light, and explains that the bridge's beacon is for the ships of the air, not those on the water. The man arrives, at last, and the lighthouse proudly gets back to work.

Hildegarde H. Swift was an excellent storyteller, and Lynd Ward made very compelling pictures with lots of broad, powerful strokes, hallmarks of the Art Deco era. The book was published in 1942, and while I own an original edition of it, I bought this edition because of the "facsimile" artwork inside. That is an interesting story in itself: Mr. Ward drew his sketches of the bridge and lighthouse from the Manhattan shore while they were under military guard after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor in 1941. His wife served as the lookout while he sketched furiously, for anyone caught making pictures and diagrams of key bridges could be arrested under suspicion of being a collaborator. He made watercolors from the sketches, and then made 3-color artwork from the watercolors. The original edition, of course, uses the 3-color artwork. But this facsimile edition, published in 2002, uses the actual original watercolor illustrations, which have a great deal more sparkle. Either way, it's a great children's book and one of the all-time classics. Certainly one of MY favorites!

The book also has a special connection with my family, for my grandparents' best friends were the famous pilot Wiley Post and his wife Mae, and the beacon atop the Great Gray Bridge (George Washington Bridge) was commemorated in Post's name to honor him. My grandmother (who, at this writing, is 102 and still very active) attended the dedication ceremony with Mae Post in the 1930s.

I remember as a child feeling powerfully for the lighthouse and the ships that wrecked when its light failed. I remember sharing its fears of being no longer needed, of being all alone, and of being unable to speak: "The little red lighthouse could neither speak nor shine." That still puts a lump in my throat to this day when I read it to children. I also remember very much how I identified with the Little Red Lighthouse's pride in its work when it was able to resume. There is a line that I think is important for children:

"Though it knows now that it is little, it is still VERY, VERY PROUD."

What a great message for tiny, new people who cannot imagine that this massive, fast-moving world could possibly need them.
Beabandis
I purchased two copies of this wonderful book - one for myself and the other as a gift for a Bulgarian friend who asked me for some English books.I read this beautiful story to my children many times over the years. The week before I ordered them, I was returning to the RV park I work at during the camping season with two exchange students who arrived at JFK International Airport from Slovakia. We stopped at an overlook on the Palisades Parkway in New Jersey, and for the very first time, I finally saw The Little Red Lighthouse, hidden under the HUGE George Washington Bridge.

This beautifully-written story has even more of an impact on me now. Being a lighthouse lover, and in spite of being a children's book, I really teared up - again - during the reread. The reprint has been vastly updated, and reading just how and when the artist sketched the tiny, red light, simply adds to the story, as it came about shortly after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. After both 9/11 and the Pearl harbor tragedy, all military structures were off-limits. In 1942 - this innocuous light was part of the US Army Corps of Engineers. No one was permitted to go near it. Lynd Ward, aware that photos were forbidden, found a myriad of different ways to sketch it for the cherished picture book he illustrated and Hildegard H Swift, penned.. A road trip is in order to visit this building, now on the National Register of Historic Places
Ffyan
I bought this book for my grand-neice (9 years old) after she attended a wedding where her uncle and his bride were photographed after the wedding ceremony standing on the Palisades overlooking he GW Bridge, and I was able to point out the lighthouse to her. She said she had never seen the book before and it became a treasure of her trip to New York City. It was one of my favorite stories when I was growing up because it describes the importance of some one or some thing that is often overlooked because it is small or out of the way, yet serves an important function in the community.
snowball
I may be prejudiced because I was raised about 10 miles from where the little red lighthouse currently resides, but I found this book an absolute delight and ordered it for my grandchildren who now live in Fort Lee practically under the bridge and can see the lighthouse across the river. I've shared the story with other adults who lived around the area and they are also delighted with the story. Amazingly, none of us heard of the lighthouse until the book was brought to my attention. I do not wish to insinuate that the book would only appeal to New York/New Jersey residents because it is charming with lovely illustrations, and because it is fiction based on historic facts, enriches the story even more. I would recommend this book for all children 3 years old and up to adulthood. A delightful read!
Jia
When I was young Captain Kangaroo would read this book on the air. After all these yeas I still remember the story which to me shows that no matter how small you are you can make a difference.

I would recommend this book as a great story t read to little ones or for them to read themselves. And it isn't bad for an older person to read it and learn its lesson.
Dont_Wory
My son lives in NYC and ran past this lighthouse. He read the history of the lighthouse and mentioned there was a book about it. I bought it and we all read it. The illustrations are great and we loved the story
Kulwes
Great book to read to the grand daughters. They loved the story and it was enjoyable to us as we saw the lighthouse under the bridge while navigating the Hudson river last month.
When my son was young, we took a walk under the George Washington bridge along the New Jersey side of the Hudson River to look at the lighthouse after reading this book. I was delighted to find a picture we took that day and so thrilled to be able to get this new edition of the book to pass along to my grandson.
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