» » Kristy and the Secret of Susan (Baby-sitters Club)

Kristy and the Secret of Susan (Baby-sitters Club) ePub download

by Ann M. Martin

  • Author: Ann M. Martin
  • ISBN: 0590731890
  • ISBN13: 978-0590731898
  • ePub: 1265 kb | FB2: 1234 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Growing Up & Facts of Life
  • Publisher: Scholastic Paperbacks (February 1, 1990)
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 621
  • Format: mobi txt rtf lrf
Kristy and the Secret of Susan (Baby-sitters Club) ePub download

Very Good: A book that has been read and does not look new, but is in excellent condition. No obvious damage to the book cover, with the dust jacket (if applicable) included for hard covers

Very Good: A book that has been read and does not look new, but is in excellent condition. No obvious damage to the book cover, with the dust jacket (if applicable) included for hard covers. No missing or damaged pages, no creases or tears, no underlining or highlighting of text, and no writing in the margins. Some identifying marks on the inside cover, but this is minimal. Very little wear and tear. See the seller’s listing for full details and description of any imperfections. See all condition definitions– opens in a new window or tab.

Читать онлайн - Martin Ann . .Kristy's Great Idea Электронная библиотека e-libra. ru Читать онлайн Kristy's Great Idea. Kristy's Great Idea Ann M. Martin CHAPTER ONE The Baby-sitters Club. I'm proud to say it was. I'm proud to say it was totally my idea, even though the four of us worked it out together.

Author(s): Ann M. Martin. Kristy and the Secret of Susan (The Babysitters Club, Published August 18th 1996 by Scholastic Hippo. ISBN: 0590731890 (ISBN13: 9780590731898). Unknown Binding, 144 pages. Author(s): Ann M. ISBN: 0590550764 (ISBN13: 9780590550765).

Before the Baby-sitters Club began I wrote Inside Out, told from the point of view of an older brother whose younger . e-ISBN 978-0-545-63261-4. Ann M. Martin, Kristy and the Secret of Susan. Thank you for reading books on BookFrom.

Before the Baby-sitters Club began I wrote Inside Out, told from the point of view of an older brother whose younger brother has autism. Happy reading, About the Author. ANN MATTHEWS MARTIN was born on August 12, 1955. She grew up in Princeton, New Jersey, with her parents and her younger sister, Jane. There are currently over 176 million copies of The Baby-sitters Club in print.

Kristy's newest baby-sitting charge is Susan Felder . Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Kristy and the Secret of Susan (The Baby-Sitters Club, as Want to Read

Kristy's newest baby-sitting charge is Susan Felder . Start by marking Kristy and the Secret of Susan (The Baby-Sitters Club, as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Home Ann M. Martin Kristy and the Secret of Susan. I love baby-sitting for my little brothers and sisters (there are four of them all together - I’ll explain that in a minute), but sometimes things can get touchy

Home Ann M. I love baby-sitting for my little brothers and sisters (there are four of them all together - I’ll explain that in a minute), but sometimes things can get touchy. David Michael sat at one end of the couch in the den, eating his sandwich, watching Gorilla Man, and occasionally casting wounded glances in my direction. Meanwhile, I tried to calm Emily down. I sat her on my lap in the armchair and explained that the remote control is for bigger people who know what all the buttons do.

Baby-Sitters Club 032 - Kristy and the Secret of Susan. Martin Ann M. Download (lit, 81 Kb). Epub FB2 PDF mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

The Baby-Sitters Club Kristy's Great Idea. how could you hate the babysitters club. Ann Martin because writing like a million books in a series is pretty amazing.

Letter from Ann M. On that particular afternoon, I was baby-sitting because everyone else was busy. Mom and Watson were at their jobs, Charlie and Sam were at after-school activities at Stoneybrook High School, and Nannie was at bowling practice

Letter from Ann M. Mom and Watson were at their jobs, Charlie and Sam were at after-school activities at Stoneybrook High School, and Nannie was at bowling practice. That is one of the things I just love about Nannie.

Kristy believes that the autistic child she sits for is normal enough to attend special ed classes at school. Baby-Sitters Club Mystery Kristy and the Missing Fortune. Books related to The Baby-Sitters Club Kristy and the Secret of Susan. The Baby-Sitters Club Mystery Abby and the Mystery Baby. The Baby-Sitters Club Mysteries Claudia and the Mystery Painting. The Baby-Sitters Club Mystery Claudia And The Lighthouse Ghost. The Baby-Sitters Club Mysteries Mallory and the Ghost Cat.

Kristy is torn between her feelings for Susan, the young autistic girl for whom she baby-sits, and the sad realization that Susan will never be one of the regular youngsters
Benn
This book doesn’t deal with the needs of a special needs child in a way that I feel comfortable with today, 28 years or so after being published.
net rider
It is a good book for kids to learn that just because people are different it doesn't mean that they are any less important
Samugul
This book needs to be pulled and heavily revised before being re-released. If other books could be updated, this one should be too. Even for 1990, this book was heavily problematic. Yes, autism was classified as a childhood schizophrenia, and yes, one of the girls asking if it meant retarded is acceptable (at that time, that wasn't seen as an insult since "retarded" was a valid medical term), but even then, it was WELL-known that autism didn't always mean being so profound that speaking isn't possible. By the time this book was written, Temple Grandin, an autistic woman, had already earned a bachelors degree AND a masters degree AND a doctorate! She was also a published author. The hugging machine briefly mentioned in another book with Susan (where she was, once again, packed off to a camp by her parents) was invented my Temple. Ann had to have known about her.

Instead of treating Susan with dignity, she's treated appallingly. Kristy physically yanks her around, forces her outside when she's trying to go to the bathroom, and somehow didn't realize something was amiss when kids were coming to the door to have Susan play a song and then leave. Susan's parents are worthless pieces of s***e who can't be bothered to spend time with her and can't wait to ship her back off to another school. Even on school breaks, Susan isn't home, and that's in the canon of this book. The Felders live locally, yet Susan's never seen. The babysitters actually discuss that. Susan is hidden away from the world like a shameful secret. The parents are ultimately neglectful and very stupid for thinking a 13-year-old should be left in charge of a profoundly autistic child. My daughter is high on the spectrum, and I won't leave her with anyone but an adult I've had the chance to watch interact with her for many hours.

The most disgusting part of this book is when Mrs. Felder announces she's pregnant again, and the pregnancy is literally called a second chance at having the family they wanted.

This book shouldn't even get one star.
Peras
The book is based partly on the author's experience as a therapist with autistic children during the summer she was in college. At the back of the book Ann Martin mentions this and the book she wrote before The Babysitters Club series, entitled, Inside Out.

Introducing a character with autism in The Babysitter series was a good idea, just presented in a way I did not like. Having a child with autism should never be a secret. This book is a start by educating children about those with autism.

The premise of The Babysitters Club is to meet three times a week for thirty minutes to get calls for sitting jobs. Each of the members has a title and function. Kristy and The Secret of Susan is written in the third person, by Kristy. Kristy is President of the Babysitters Club, thirteen years old and in the eighth grade.

There is a Babysitters Club notebook that contains the writeup of all the jobs they do. They learn how their friends solve problems and what is going on with the kids they watch.

I often found myself looking back to the beginning recap on each of the members since it was confusing to recall the sibling names for all the girls.

The reason for me perusing The Babysitters Club #32, Kristy and The Secret of Susan was due to the topic of autism, so I tried to keep track of all the members.

One day Mrs. Felder called to get someone to sit Susan. Susan went to a special school far away, currently home for one month before heading off to another new school. Mrs. Felder wanted a sitter for three days a weeks from 3:30 - 5:30, so she could have a break. Mrs. Felder mentioned to Kristy on the phone that Susan was autistic.

At the Babysitters Club meeting the girls discussed what autistic meant. Kristy looked the word up in the dictionary, which mentioned Childhood Schizophrenia. When checking that word out Kristy became more confused, "withdrawing from reality".

I liked that the storyline had them check the dictionary. In fact that was the first place I looked when I read "autistic like" in a report seven years ago relating to my own son.

Right away I had mixed feelings about Mrs. Felder. It did not seem right to me as the single parent to two boys on the autism spectrum that this parent needed so many breaks during a one-month period her eight year old autistic daughter was home. I felt this was the wrong message and would have preferred if she needed to keep up with some obligations she had year-long. It seemed a bit drastic for respite time with the time-period chosen.

We learn that Susan plays the piano and remembers dates. She can sing and recite music she just heard, but does not speak. Although not mentioned within the pages of The Babysitters Club, Kristy and The Secret of Susan these are savant skills that affect about 10% of the autistic population.

Susan is in her own world, she wrings her hands, clicks her tongue and rarely makes eye contact. Her yard is fenced in for she gallops back and forth. My son is also eight and he has been skipping merrily along for several years now and does not speak either.

The month went by quickly and then it was time for Kristy to help Mrs. Felder pack for Susan and say goodbye. This was when Kristy met Mr. Felder and told him of her dream to keep Susan home with them and make friends in the neighborhood.

Mr. Felder explained to Kristy about the special school and how they used music to get through to kids. It was also shared that Mrs. Felder was going to have another baby.

Kristy thought about being a teacher working with special kids like Susan. The Babysitters Club, Kristy and The Secret of Susan covers fifteen chapters within 145 pages. It is a quick read for a pre-teen or teenager. It might be helpful for a sibling to see how others in their age group learn about autism through trial and error.

Although the reader had some insight into the special talents of Susan, it was not really made clear why she needed the special school far away from home. It almost seemed like since Mrs. Felder was having another baby that they shipped off Susan so they could be the family they had wanted.

This book is from 1990 and attitudes were different regarding disabilities and autism.
Stan
The "Secret" of Susan is that she is an autistic kid. One of my pet peeves is unleashed here: of course, you can't be autistic in fiction without being a savant. So Susan has music superpowers and date-memorization superpowers. Kristy gets to sit for her and gets all ticked off that her parents have been sending her away to a special school, and gets all self-righteous about how she thinks they are just shipping her off so they don't have to deal with her. What I don't understand is why she assumes that these schools aren't good programs.

Kristy decides to put the autistic girl in unfamiliar situations and push her into "making friends," which she can't do like a neurotypical person as she is apparently quite profoundly autistic (despite being able to sing; she doesn't talk). This is actually usually kinda dangerous for autistic kids who are used to specific surroundings and stimuli, so that makes it seem like Kristy is really irresponsible. Kids in the neighborhood end up making her do tricks with her memory and it's really annoying. I did like that Kristy didn't Teach the Parents an Important Lesson and turn out to be right about everything, though.

An Australian family moves into town . . . people with kids are freaking constantly moving into this town . . . and they're drawn up very stereotypically as other kids make fun of their way of speaking. I didn't care for it.
E-Books Related to Kristy and the Secret of Susan (Baby-sitters Club):