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So What?: Welcome to First Grade ePub download

by Lillian Hoban,Miriam Cohen

  • Author: Lillian Hoban,Miriam Cohen
  • ISBN: 0606137831
  • ISBN13: 978-0606137836
  • ePub: 1818 kb | FB2: 1967 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Growing Up & Facts of Life
  • Publisher: Demco Media (April 1, 1998)
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 647
  • Format: txt lrf mbr docx
So What?: Welcome to First Grade ePub download

Author(s): Miriam Cohen, Lillian Hoban. So What? (Hardcover). Published October 1st 1982 by Greenwillow Books. So What? (Welcome to the First Grade). Published March 9th 1998 by Yearling.

Author(s): Miriam Cohen, Lillian Hoban. ISBN: 0688012035 (ISBN13: 9780688012038). Author(s): Miriam Cohen. ISBN: 0688012027 (ISBN13: 9780688012021). ISBN: 0440411483 (ISBN13: 9780440411482).

by Miriam Cohen, Lillian Hoban. ISBN 9780688801878 (978-0-688-80187-8) Hardcover, Greenwillow, 1979. Coauthors & Alternates. Learn More at LibraryThing. Miriam Cohen at LibraryThing.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Author Miriam Cohen's story feels very disjointed. Jim observes various things that his classmates do and say and then decides to start a club - that feels very random. And little kids are random, sometimes, but their books shouldn't be. When the class is measured, Cohen lists each child and their height, down to the quarter inch. If this was one of the books that centered on math, it would make sense; here it just makes awkward reading. Paul was 3 feet 11 inches.

Hoban was especially fond of the First Grade Friends series of books that she illustrated for Miriam Cohen. The series follows an entire classroom from pre-school to second grade. The first book in the series, Will I Have a Friend was published in 1967. Other titles in this series include Best Friends, The New Teacher, Tough Jim, and Starring First Grade. So What? Greenwillow.

First-grader Jim is upset because he can't hang upside down on the jungle gym without holding on, and everyone else can. But then the new girl Elinor says so what? to his problem, and soon Jim learns to see things her way. Four-color illustrations.

The first verse is from Lecrae’s perspective, talking about his life growing up and living in America. The second verse is from the perspective of an army veteran who thinks that a lot of fellow Americans are ungrateful for the sacrifice him and other vets made for their country

The first verse is from Lecrae’s perspective, talking about his life growing up and living in America. The second verse is from the perspective of an army veteran who thinks that a lot of fellow Americans are ungrateful for the sacrifice him and other vets made for their country. The last verse is from the view of a person in poverty, likely but not necessarily from somewhere in Central/South America or Asia, and how he thinks America is amazing and wants to live there and move there.

Miriam Cohen s timely story highlights a challenge that many children face in today s multicultural environment Bee My Valentine. We Love First Grade! It's Valentine's Day and the first graders are excited about the cards they will receive. Their teacher requests everybody in class to send a Valentine's card to everybody else so that nobody feels left out. However, in their eagerness to create the.

It was first published in 2000. Delving deep into his own meticulous notes and previously unpublished papers and cabinet records, Lee details the extraordinary efforts it took for an island city-state in Southeast Asia to survive, with just a razor’s edge to manoeuvre in, as Albert Winsemius, Singapore’s economic advisor in the 1960s, put i. e read how a young man of 42 and his.

A first grader learns to accept himself as he is.
Ranicengi
I think this book is about average as a story. However, my daughter's kindergarten teacher recommended this to us because she thought my daughter was "taking things too hard" when interacting with other kids. The message of the book is that you can choose to take things hard or just say (inside your head) "so what" when kids do things that hurt your feelings. For an overly sensitive kid this is a freeing message. I read this with my daughter and she got it right away. She started coming home with stories about how she said "so what" when kids said things that hurt her at school. She started out saying it outloud to the other kids and we had to discuss how this can provoke more teasing or conflict. Now she knows to say it to herself. Obviously, this strategy is not for every situation and we discussed when it is best used and when to talk things over with us or take other actions. Overall, it was a very helpful change and she is happier for it. What better recommendation can a book get?
Cells
ISBN 0440400481 - Dell Young Yearling books are, generally, a series I enjoy. The books tend to use age appropriate language for 5 to 8 year olds and include simple lessons for children. This book, however, doesn't do it for me.

Jim isn't able to do a lot of things. He can't hang by his knees on the jungle gym without using his hands, he can't start a club without everyone quitting, he can't dance... and he's not on the top 3 list of the most popular kids in school. While he struggles with his mediocrity, a new girl named Elinor Woodman, from Chicago, Illinois, seems to shrug things off with ease. Every time she's confronted with Jim's concerns about his inferiority, she says "so what?" By the time Jim finally learns this lesson for himself, Elinor has moved back to Chicago, but she's left behind something of great value to Jim.

I know that there's a good lesson here. I just don't think the book does a good job of explaining that lesson. Author Miriam Cohen's story feels very disjointed. Jim observes various things that his classmates do and say and then decides to start a club - that feels very random. And little kids are random, sometimes, but their books shouldn't be. When the class is measured, Cohen lists each child and their height, down to the quarter inch. If this was one of the books that centered on math, it would make sense; here it just makes awkward reading. "Paul was 3 feet 11 inches. Willy was 3 feet 10 inches. Sammy was 3 feet 9 3/4 inches. Danny was..." Seriously. Last, the periodic "so what?" is clearly supposed to be the lesson: don't let it get to you. Instead, it makes Elinor appear to be saying "who cares?" when Jim feels down.

The illustrations, by Lillian Hoban, are nice. They're not spectacular, but the book is for an age group that is moving away from picture books. The images suit the story. However. I'm not an easily freaked out parent, but I did a double take on this one. On pages 3-4, there is an image of the playground. Two girls are jumping rope, one in pink and one in blue. They are both wearing leggings under their skirts, which are frilly and short. Short. The skirt of the girl in pink is so short that her butt is visible. And, since her leggings are pink, she appears to be nude under her skirt. This is not the case, but it is clearly a bad color choice on Hoban's part and something that appears in a couple drawings. I thought some parents might appreciate knowing in advance.

Other books in the series, from the same author, include When Will I Read? and Bee My Valentine (Picture Yearling Book).

- AnnaLovesBooks
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