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Shizuko's Daughter (Edge Books) ePub download

by Kyoko Mori

  • Author: Kyoko Mori
  • ISBN: 080502557X
  • ISBN13: 978-0805025576
  • ePub: 1541 kb | FB2: 1179 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Growing Up & Facts of Life
  • Publisher: Henry Holt and Co. (BYR); 1st edition (March 15, 1993)
  • Pages: 227
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 673
  • Format: docx mobi txt lrf
Shizuko's Daughter (Edge Books) ePub download

Kyoko Mori is the author of three nonfiction books: Yarn: Remembering the Way Home; Polite Lies: On Being a Woman Caught Between Cultures; and The Dream of Water.

Only 18 left in stock (more on the way). Kyoko Mori is the author of three nonfiction books: Yarn: Remembering the Way Home; Polite Lies: On Being a Woman Caught Between Cultures; and The Dream of Water. Mori’s essay Yarn was selected for The Best American Essays 2004 and Polite Lies was shortlisted for PEN’s Martha Albrand Nonfiction Award.

Shizuko's Daughter book. A beautifully written book about a bitterly painful.

Shizuko's Daughter, . The cap came off and the lipstick rolled to the edge of the carpet. Your poor mother, Aya said. Shizuko lay on the couch in her living room in Kobe and dreamed that she was among the village children in red and blue kimonos chasing the hard, dry rice cakes that came down, like colored pebbles, from the sky. In the village where she was born, that was how people had celebrated the building of a new house. She turned aside and pressed her fingers to her eyes.

Shizuko's Daughter by Kyoko MoriAn ALA Best Book for Young AdultsA New York Times Notable BookAfter her mother's suicide when she is twelve years old, Yuki spends years living with her distant father and his resentful.

Shizuko's Daughter by Kyoko MoriAn ALA Best Book for Young AdultsA New York Times Notable BookAfter her mother's suicide when she is twelve years old, Yuki spends years living with her distant father and his resentful new wife, cut off from her mother's family, and relying on her own inner strength to cope with the tragedy. Shizuko's Daughter by Kyoko Mori. An ALA Best Book for Young Adults A New York Times Notable Book.

Shizuko's Daughter by Kyoko Mori. Maya Ishida is no stranger to sorrow. After her mother's suicide when she is twelve years old, Yuki spends years living with her distant father and his resentful new wife, cut off from her mother's family, and relying on her own inner strength to cope with the tragedy. Torn from her artist father in her native Japan, raised by her cold, ambitious mother in Minneapolis, she has finally put together a life with few disruptions: a safe marriage and a quiet life weaving clothes in a country studio.

Shizuko's Daughter - Kyoko Mori. She had dropped her books, turned off the gas, and called her father at work. He had told her not to call an ambulance and create a commotion-he would fetch a doctor himself and come home immediately. While she waited for them, Yuki opened the windows to let out the gas.

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Shizuko’s Daughter Teacher’s Guide. Kyoko Mori was born and raised in Japan but now lives in De Pere, Wisconsin, where she is an associate professor of English and Creative Writing at Saint Norbert College. Shizuko’s Daughter Teacher’s Guide. Category: Teen & Young Adult Fiction. Discussion and writing. Questions for discussion. 1. Mori gives us Shizuko’s thoughts, feelings, and actions on the last day of her life.

ca, Canada's largest bookstore. These books all include guides to get your book club discussions started! Title : The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane Author : Lisa See Narrators : Ruthie Ann Miles, Kimiko Glenn Publisher : Simon & Schuster Aud. More information.

"A cast of three-dimensional characters, keen imagery and attention to detail produce an emotionally and culturally rich tale tracing the evolution of despair into hope." --Publishers Weekly, starred review
Zuser
Yuki is only twelve when her mother commits suicide. Her father almost immediately remarries, to a woman in his office named Hanae. Yuki knows that her father was having an affair with Hanae before her mother's death, but keeps her mouth shut, instead deciding to honor her mother's memory by going on and living her life, as she had promised her mother years ago.

The novel is a collection of snippets from Yuki's life, from the time she's twelve and discovers her mother on the kitchen floor to the time she's nineteen. We see Hanae trying to erase Shizuko's memory in any way possible, Yuki fighting to stay in contact with her mother's relatives even against Hanae's direct orders, and her father's inability to say no to his new wife, even to the point that it causes pain for Yuki. Such a tearjerking novel, about the deep bond between a mother and her daughter, that is never broken despite death and a father and stepmother's attempts to pretend as if Shizuko never existed.

I first picked up this novel when I was in high school, but I remember not really being very interested in it at the time. I decided to give it another chance and oh, my, gosh, I'm so glad I did. Yuki is such a real, empathetic character that she feels as if she could be one of my students (at least in the beginning of the novel while she's still in grade school, because I teach elementary) and I want to just give her a big old hug and tell her everything's going to be okay. This novel gives us a good taste of the real Japan, of the Japanese tendency to talk in circles rather than be blunt, making Yuki's straightforward attitude even more refreshing. All terms and locations are defined in the glossary in the back, but enough context is given in the moment that there's no need to stop reading to look something up.

What a beautiful, heartwrenching story. The reason this doesn't get five stars is because it was Yuki's story, and while we did spend some time with her maternal grandmother in a few chapters, the epilogue was from her grandmother's point of view and didn't even mention Yuki, which was rather disappointing.

There is no explicit content in this book, though the subject matter is rather mature and children might find it boring or it might go over their heads, so I would say that older teens and adults would probably enjoy this book the most. This is a book about the bond between a mother and daughter, and it got me to thinking about my own relationship with my mother and how happy I am that we're extremely close and she's healthy and will still live for many more years. I couldn't put it down and devoured it in one go!
Lcena
I tried my best, not only to like it but to finish it, to no avail. If this is recommended reading for teens, I loudly disagree I found it boring, repetitive, and incredibly depressing. After more than 30 pages, I simply had to stop because my hope of something better around the corner...a lesson, a happy moment...anything...was dashed. I would never give this to my child to read.
Уou ll never walk alone
Shizuko’s Daughter by Kyoko Mori successfully demonstrates the inner struggles of an average girl. Out of the numerous coming-of-age novels that I have read, this one struck me the most. I believe Japanese novels have a way with making a reader truly understand and relate to the author’s intent- something that I feel American novels lack. Although I have never experienced loss, Yuki’s character was crafted in such a way that anyone can relate to her. Due to her mother’s suicide, she stays reserved and is considered an outsider. As an introvert, this novel really spoke to me because like Yuki, I usually resort to art and my imagination for consolation.

I believe it was the pacing and vivid imagery that intrigued me the most. Mori’s use of flower symbolism incorporated with artistic elements is what draws the reader in. Each page is filled with a colorful aspect to offer change in the story’s atmosphere. There are scenes describing various flowers in captivating detail, emphasizing the direct correlation of flowers to Shizuko’s spontaneity. The writing style truly reflects upon Yuki’s and Shizuko’s artistic passion.

Aside from the writing style, the story puts the reader into perspective. Throughout the novel, there are instances where I felt enraged due to Hanei’s ruthlessness or Hideki’s negligence. But there were moments where I had sympathy for Hideki, since his grief and guilt only worsen as he ages. The novel sheds light upon abuse and loss, as well as a prominent topic of suicide in Japan, often considered taboo in its conservative society. Although the reason for Shizuko’s suicide is rather abstract in the beginning, her motive starts to unravel as the story progresses.

As for Yuki, one can observe her need for validation. As a direct impact of her mother’s death, she pities dying animals and chooses to save them. One point to mention is Yuki’s quiet infatuation towards a girl in the track team. She manages to fill her void temporarily, only to be faced with loneliness once they disconnect. Mori describes Yuki’s indifference towards love and her struggle to accept it, as she believes it only ends with sadness.

Above everything else, Shizuko’s Daughter allows readers to empathize with its realistic characters. I thank Mori for giving a raw perspective of depression, rather than romanticizing it like popular shows and novels do. Each character’s situation varies, providing ways to cope with one’s personal issues. The characters move on from the past through major development. Mori breaks the boundaries of Japanese conformity by describing the transition of an outcast to an independent girl. She proves contrary to the famous Japanese phrase, “the nail that sticks out gets hammered down.” Despite the unfortunate events, Mori promises hope for the characters’ futures. Shizuko’s Daughter provides a number of valuable life lessons, impacting the way one goes about his or her daily life after this reading experience.
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