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Abiyoyo ePub download

by Michael Hays,Pete Seeger

  • Author: Michael Hays,Pete Seeger
  • ISBN: 0027814904
  • ISBN13: 978-0027814903
  • ePub: 1767 kb | FB2: 1186 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Geography & Cultures
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing (April 1, 1986)
  • Pages: 48
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 878
  • Format: lrf rtf doc txt
Abiyoyo ePub download

Moultrie reads and plays ukulele to the story Abiyoyo.

Moultrie reads and plays ukulele to the story Abiyoyo. The Story of Abiyoyo by Pete Seeger illustrated by Michael Hayes.

Pete Seeger is a national treasure, arguably the most influential figure in American folk music as well as an important . This book was a great follow up to the first Abiyoyo -- it would have been even better to have a Pete Seeger CD along with it telling the story just like the first book.

Pete Seeger is a national treasure, arguably the most influential figure in American folk music as well as an important advocate of social causes. He lives in Beacon, New York.

Abiyoyo, the popular picture-book version of a storysong by Pete Seeger, illustrated by Michael Hays, turns 15 in October

Abiyoyo, the popular picture-book version of a storysong by Pete Seeger, illustrated by Michael Hays, turns 15 in October.

Pete Seeger's storysong Abiyoyo has delighted generations of parents and children. The tale of how a father with his magic wand and a boy with his music triumph over the giant Abiyoyo is based on a South African lullaby and folk story.

Pete Seeger's storysong Abiyoyo is a children's picture book published by Simon and Schuster (with audio CD recorded by Pete Seeger). Storyteller Pete Seeger. Introducing storyteller Pete Seeger to Abiyoyo fans. Sing together, work together to make a better world. Abiyoyo comes to America in a song book from South Africa.

Abiyoyo by Pete Seeger - Outcasts become heroes in this picture book adaptation of a South African lullaby and folk . Michael Hays has illustrated several picture books, including the sequel to Abiyoyo, Abiyoyo Returns. He lives in Chicago, Illinois.

Abiyoyo by Pete Seeger - Outcasts become heroes in this picture book adaptation of a South African lullaby and folk story  . Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers (October 2001). ISBN13: 9780689846939.

Abiyoyo Artist Michael Hays, Chicago, Illinois. In my imagination this children’s book character was a personification of the racist apartheid system. com/watch?v qnYtcH4YS44.

The seemingly ageless Seeger brings back his renowned giant for another go in a tuneful tale that, like the art, is a bit . But the rock that Abiyoyo obligingly flings aside smashes the wand. How to avoid Abiyoyo's destruction now?

Faced with yearly floods and droughts since they've cut down all their trees, the townsfolk decide to build a dam-but the project is stymied by a boulder that is too huge to move.

More picture books by Pete Seeger and Michael Hays and lots more of Michael’s illustrated picture books. Your Own Giant Story. Kids draw and paint Abiyoyo. Kids act out the story of Abiyoyo. Kids ask questions about the scary giant. Kids make up their own stories. Older kids begin to ask bigger questions about Abiyoyo.

Pete Seeger’s most popular book is Abiyoyo. Books by Pete Seeger. Showing 30 distinct works. Abiyoyo by. Pete Seeger.

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Once there was a little boy who played the ukelele. Wherever he'd go he'd play, Clink, clunk, clonk. His father was a magician. Wherever he'd go, he'd make things disappear, Zoop! Zoop! Soon the townspeople grew tired of the boy's noise and his father's tricks, and banished both of them to the edge of town.

There they lived, until one day the terrible giant Abiyoyo appeared. He was as tall as a tree, and it was said that he could eat people up. Everyone was terrified, except the boy and his father, and they came up with a plan to save the town...

Peter Seeger's storysong, made up for his own children, finds its perfect match in Michael Hays's masterful paintings. Together they make a richly vivid and exciting story.

Once there was a little boy who played the ukelele. Wherever he'd go he'd play, Clink, clunk, clonk. His father was a magician. Wherever he'd go, he'd make things disappear, Zoop! Zoop! Soon the townspeople grew tired of the boy's noise and his father's tricks, and banished both of them to the edge of town.

There they lived, until one day the terrible giant Abiyoyo appeared. He was as tall as a tree, and it was said that he could eat people up. Everyone was terrified, except the boy and his father, and they came up with a plan to save the town...

Peter Seeger's storysong, made up for his own children, finds its perfect match in Michael Hays's masterful paintings. Together they make a richly vivid and exciting story.

Ueledavi
I love this book! I use it for a music lesson with K-3 grade. My students love singing this song, doing sound effects as we read the story, and dancing like Abiyoyo until they (carefully! slow motion!) fall asleep... and Zoop! disappear (and in place of all the sleeping Abiyoyos, there will be perfectly well-behaved children). I also worked out a Xylophone part, playing "inside/outside" (EG/DA) which goes with the chord progression (EG works with both the G6 chord and the A7 chord)- they can prep this by patting with "yoyo" on their legs while I demo on the instruments. (If you try this idea, please reply to my review, I'd love to hear how it goes for you!)
Faegal
I'm shocked by the few negative reviews on this book that even exist. We learned about this book through my daughter's preschool, which is, by all accounts, a phenomenal, well known preschool, with excellent teachers. My daughter came home talking about this book, and when I asked her teachers about it, they said, without fail, it is a perennial favorite-- EVERY YEAR-- of the kids in the 2-3 year old class (and older kids like it, too). The story of this giant really captures the imagination of the children. I can only imagine that the couple of reviewers whose children were frightened by this book must have children who are just VERY VERY sensitive-- on the far end of the spectrum. Not to spoil the end, but the giant in this book gets excited to hear his name in a song, gets so excited he dances his heart out, and collapses from, basically, getting his dance on. It's not scary. My daughter loved this book in her class at age 2, and just turned 3, and received it for her birthday. She asks to read it all the time. She loves to talk about giants. The sequel, titled Abiyoyo Returns, is equally popular among this age set. The one negative thing I would say is that the author changes tenses within paragraphs, which really irritates me as a reader and is grammatically improper. However, the book is based on verbal storytelling and folk tales, so it is written the way someone might tell a story. And, given how much the kids LOVE this book, I can overlook it.
Coirad
Classic story! Both my 3 and 1 year old love the story and neither were scared by it. They ask for it frequently. I YouTubed the song once or twice so I could hear others singing it. So glad I purchased.
Lost Python
There's a Reading Rainbow episode covering this book. Excellent. My toddler loves it. She learned "ukulele", "ostracized", and "possessions" from this book and sings the song all over the place. We even bought the sequel. :-)
Kanek
Love this book. The children love hearing the song and story. This is a newer edition w/ different reader on the CD. I wish I can find the original story read out loud by James Earl Jones. I love his story telling and his voice :))
Winenama
I have 4 boys 16-24 yrs old. They have LOVED this story and have happy memories of listening to it at home, in the car-everywhere. I had the book and the song on cassette. (I think Raffi sang it but I know it is a Pete Seeger song) Anyway-I bought the Pete Seeger CD and was teaching preschool to 4 yr olds. They loved the story and begged me to read it to them again. Instead I played the CD that goes with the book and it says "Come back to town and bring your DAMN ukelele" I was very upset that I played that in front of my class. Yes-I should have listened to it before hand but I thought it would go with the book. The book says "darn ukelele". Anyway-I won't be playing this in front of my class again and have now wasted money since I already had the book.
IWantYou
My 4 yo daughter was introduced to this book at her preschool, where it's a perennial favorite. At first, she told me she didn't like it and that she would walk away from the circle when it was read, but over the course of a few months it became a favorite she talked about frequently. She would play an "Abiyoyo's coming" pretend game in which she would find ways to protect us. Clearly this book has played a role in helping her believe that she can find solutions to things she fears. We took it out of the library so many times I finally bought it for her, and months later she still loves it! Highly recommended.
I LOVE LOVE LOVE this tale. i can stretch this for about 20 mins (with sound effects and dramatic voices) and my preschoolers are captivated! I sing the abiyoyo song to the children's French song "aluette" and they love singing it all day long! Lol or maybe... All year long!
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