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Children Who Kill: Profiles of Teen and Pre-teen Killers ePub download

by Carol Anne Davis

  • Author: Carol Anne Davis
  • ISBN: 0749006935
  • ISBN13: 978-0749006938
  • ePub: 1909 kb | FB2: 1851 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: True Crime
  • Publisher: Allison and Busby (November 1, 2011)
  • Pages: 320
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 767
  • Format: rtf mobi azw txt
Children Who Kill: Profiles of Teen and Pre-teen Killers ePub download

Carol Anne Davis was born in Scotland and now lives in southwest England. A full-time writer since graduating, her non-fiction books include Couples Who Kill, Women Who Kill and Doctors Who Kill.

Carol Anne Davis was born in Scotland and now lives in southwest England. Her Master of the Arts degree included Criminology and was followed by a postgraduate diploma in Adult and Community Education.

Profiles of Pre-teen and Teenage Killers. The following profiles, then, are stories of cruelty and of loss, of children who weren’t allowed to experience a happy childhood. But they can also be stories of hope because the power to change future childhoods is within our grasp.

Children Who Kill is a comprehensive new study of juvenile homicide. Carol Anne Davis sets out to explore this disturbing subject using in-depth case studies of thirteen killers aged between ten and seventeen. Exclusive interviews with experts offer an invaluable insight into the psychology behind these atrocities and a hard-hitting look at the role of society in an area too shocking to ignore. About the Author: CAROL ANNE DAVIS was born in Dundee, moved to Edinburgh in her twenties and now lives in the south of England.

Children Who Kill: Profiles of Pre-Teen and Teenage Killers. In a comprehensive study of juvenile homicide, Carol Anne Davis offers new psychological insights and a hard-hitting look at the role of society in an area too shocking to ignore. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Publisher: Allison & BusbyReleased: May 22, 2014ISBN: 9780749016234Format: book. carousel previous carousel next. Doctors Who Kill: Profiles of Lethal Medics.

Why would two young boys abduct, torture and kill a toddler? What makes a teenage girl plot with her classmates to kill. You're getting the VIP treatment! With the purchase of Kobo VIP Membership, you're getting 10% off and 2x Kobo Super Points on eligible items. Your Shopping Cart is empty. There are currently no items in your Shopping Cart.

There is also a third book about murderous children that profiles Mary Bell; Children Who Kill: Profiles of Pre-teen and .

There is also a third book about murderous children that profiles Mary Bell; Children Who Kill: Profiles of Pre-teen and Teenager Killers by Carol Ann Davis. However, I wonder - other children who have been abused have not become murderers, although they developed multiple personalities or manifested their dysfunction in other ways.

What makes a teenage girl plot with her classmates to kill her own father?. Children Who Kill is a comprehensive new study of juvenile homicide. Compare similar products. Read full description. See details and exclusions. Sold byergodebooks-int (505)98. 4% positive FeedbackContact seller. Registered as business seller. Children Who Kill: Profiles of Pre-teen and Teenage Killers by Carol Anne Davis (Paperback, 2004). Current slide {CURRENT SLIDE} of {TOTAL SLIDES}- Compare similar products.

Why would two young boys abduct, torture and kill a toddler? What makes a teenage girl plot with her classmates to kill her own father? Traditionally, society is used to regarding children as harmless -- but for some the age of innocence is short-lived, messy and ultimately murderous. Children Who Kill is a comprehensive new study of juvenile homicide. Carol Anne Davis sets out to explore this disturbing subject using in-depth case studies of thirteen killers aged between ten and seventeen. Exclusive interviews with experts offer an invaluable insight into the psychology behind these atrocities and a hard-hitting look at the role of society in an area too shocking to ignoreSee:
Akinohn
Most of the cases included here come from author Davis’ native British Isles. Some of the individuals who committed their killings as children date from the 1800’s, but the majority were born in the 1950’s or 1960’s.

This book was published in 2003. There have been developments in the lives of many of the more recent perpetrators, with their sentences having been commuted, or brought to some other resolution. Updates are available online. However, this book provides a good grounding in the early lives of these young killers.

The killers Davis covers generally came from extremely abusive homes. As the author aptly summarizes, “You get so used to an atmosphere of violence, you re-create it wherever you are.” However, there are a few exceptions, such as the case of Jennifer Tombs who ostensibly shot her babysitter because she wanted to go out and party. While Davis reports that Tombs’ adoptive mother, a preacher, was strict – the reader might get a sense that Davis is reaching to find sufficient familial dysfunction and mistreatment here to explain Jennifer’s outburst of violence.

Davis generally avoids altogether cases that don’t conform to her theory of extreme abuse being sufficient explanation for youthful killers. She is convincing in her attempts to trace a lot of childhood violence back to parental mistreatment, but she doesn’t consider cases such as Anne Perry/Pauline Parker, Leopold/Loeb, and Jeffrey Dahmer – individuals who were not egregiously victimized by their parents. (While Leopold and Loeb, and Dahmer weren’t exactly “children” when they committed murder, they did start to manifest many disturbing tendencies at an early age.) So although one can point to certain underlying problems of parental aloofness or absence in some of these seemingly more benign households, they don’t follow any easy rule of thumb of “violent parents = violent children.”

In the same way, Davis makes a good case for exonerating influences such as violent music lyrics, comic book violence, and movie violence. However again, her acquittal doesn’t take into account how the atmosphere such media create can desensitize young people to real-life suffering.

Therefore, while Davis’ accounts tell a good part of the story, they don’t tell the whole story. Readers are still left to puzzle over the relative influence of nature versus nurture, and the source of the permission people grant themselves to commit murder.

Davis provides an excellent bibliography, which includes Alice Miller’s eye-opening books on how abusive child-rearing practices propagate violence. Just to weigh in with a mote of evidence supporting “nature-as-cause” versus these strictly “nurture-as-cause” viewpoints, I recommend three books:
+“Awakenings” by Oliver Sacks – which includes reference to how exposure to the mysterious sleeping sickness disease ultimately transformed some of its victims from friendly, well-adjusted people into explosive people plagued by very specific fixations and obsessions. This can also lead readers to consider how other diseases, injuries, or genetic problems can affect people’s personalities.
+“A Father’s Story” by Lionel Dahmer – in which Jeffrey’s father recounts how he himself experienced some bizarre, violent obsessions that came at him out of nowhere at an early age. He didn’t act on these compulsive fixations to any dangerous degree, but he tells how he feared he might have passed on a tendency for similar neuronal wiring to his son;
+“Tourette Syndrome and Human Behavior” by David Comings – which includes extensive genealogies showing how certain serious psychological/behavioral problems run through families, even if members of that family are separated into different generations, different cultures, different foster homes.

None of this though detracts from Davis’ well-researched, empathetic study of how often those who create suffering have themselves suffered.
Landarn
I became fascinated with the concept of child killers after watching a documentary on television. I loved the way this book was fact-based but kept me reading like it was a novel. As a mystery writer, I am delving into the mind of a child killer in my next novel and say this book went a long way to educate me and give me a solid background for my character. Don't be mislead. This is almost a dark horror book when you consider what always has and continues to happen to children in our society.
Shalinrad
Appallingly Stark! It was more frightening from a parent's view than I expected--Parental Abuse was the key to children killing!
blac wolf
This book is chilling...but makes you think about some of the children you've come across and some of the parents who tend to "look" the other way
Alsardin
It was a gift to my daughter. She would read it to me and I was so engulfed into it, I did nothing but listen.
Hap
I really liked the psychological journey into the minds of the children presented here. I enjoyed that she doesn't believe in 'bad seeds' and instead tries to find an explanation from the behavior, specially focusing on child abuse of any kind. Also very well researched and written. Great book, I'm planning on buying more from the same author.
mym Ђудęm ęгσ НuK
This author seriously needs a real editor. While the content is interesting I couldn't hang with the awful writing. Look for another book on the subject.
My wife purchased this book for a school project and read the entire thing over night and has since then shared it with all her friends!
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