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Tunnel Vision: Trial Error ePub download

by Robert Marshall

  • Author: Robert Marshall
  • ISBN: 1892941783
  • ISBN13: 978-1892941787
  • ePub: 1608 kb | FB2: 1747 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Regional U.S.
  • Publisher: Algora Publishing (December 2, 2001)
  • Pages: 228
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 457
  • Format: rtf txt mobi lit
Tunnel Vision: Trial  Error ePub download

Tunnel Vision is written from death row by Robert Marshall, a New Jersey inmate whose case was chronicled in the book Blind Faith

Tunnel Vision is written from death row by Robert Marshall, a New Jersey inmate whose case was chronicled in the book Blind Faith. Robert Marshall notes that Joe McGinniss, the writer who caricatured him in Blind Faith, also wrote Fatal Vision - a book that was successfully rebutted, in 1996, in Fatal Justice. Marshall still receives letters saying that outside observers feel there were too many loose ends on his case, that his true story has not yet been told, and that Blind Faith made no sense. Tunnel Vision is his response. It gives the readers a chance to know the real Robert Marshall.

Although the jury found McInerney a liar with respect to Thomas being the shooter, they could not see that he was lying about Robert Marshall. Rob was convicted, and sentenced to death.

By Robert O. Marshall. By Robert O. Although the jury found McInerney a liar with respect to Thomas being the shooter, they could not see that he was lying about Robert Marshall. Over 14 million journal, magazine, and newspaper articles.

Tunnel Vision is written from death row by Robert Marshall, a New Jersey inmate whose case was chronicled in the book Blind Faith, and in the mini-series starring Robert Ulrich and Joanna Kerns. Back in 1989, Blind Faith was a bestseller but nobody heard from Robert Marshall; this book is his side of the story. Algora Publishing is not in a position to make a judgment on the judicial aspects of his case but is happy to be in a position to enable a man to deliver a message.

By (author) Robert Marshall.

ISBN 10: 1892941791 ISBN 13: 9781892941794. Publisher: Algora Pub, 2002.

Tunnel Vision Lyrics. Glee Southside Ayy, lil' Metro on that beat. Lil' Kodak, they don't like to see you winnin' They wanna see you in the penitentiary I need me a lil' baby who gon' listen Girl, I don't wanna be the one you iggin' My mama told me, "Boy, make good decisions!"

Tunnel Vision Lyrics. Glee Southside Ayy, lil' Metro on that beat

Tunnel Vision is written from death row by Robert Marshall, a New Jersey inmate whose case was chronicled in the book Blind Faith, and in the mini-series starring Robert Ulrich and Joanna Kerns. Back in 1989, Blind Faith was a bestseller but nobody heard from Robert Marshall; this book is his side of the story. Marshall contends that that account is highly inaccurate and so do many people who send him letters of support. Algora Publishing is not in a position to make a judgment on the judicial aspects of his case but is happy to be in a position to enable a man to deliver a message.Here is the inside story of a headline-making murder-for-hire case that has been at the heart of the debate over the death penalty and mandatory sentencing laws in New jersey for over 25 years.Convicted in New Jersey in 1986 in what came to be known as the Parkway Murder, Robert Marshall says he was subjected to a seriously flawed trial. In Tunnel Vision, he refutes the allegations made by Joe McGinnis, author of Blind Faith, and seeks to set the record straight. This is a story that raises serious questions about his case in particular and the death penalty in general. It makes one wonder about the justice system when one co-conspirator in a murder, who admits his guilt, can walk away virtually scot free, and another, who has denied guilt from the beginning, receives a death sentence. Readers will come to their own conclusions.According to New Jersey Policy Reports ("moneyfornothing"), "In April 2004, a federal court set aside Robert Marshall's 1986 death sentence and ordered a new penalty phase trial on grounds that enough questions were raised by the way Marshall's private attorney handled the penalty phase of his trial that the lower court should review it. Marshall has since been represented in his appeals process by public defenders. The decision to reverse Marshall's death sentence was upheld by the Third Circuit Court of Appeals on November 2, 2005." "In the stark language of the court," writes Seamus McGraw in JUSTICE DELAYED: THE ROBERT MARSHALL STORY (Crime Library), [Judge] Irenas declared that Marshall's lawyer had failed to meet the standards expected of 'competent counsel.'NJN (NJ public television) received the Philadelphia Press Association's Television Feature Award on June 25, 2004, for its documentary "Due Process: The Strange Case of Bobby Cumber", produced by Sandra King, which explores Bobby Cumber's conviction for his role in this case and the judge's statement that 'he would have applied a drastically shorter sentence were it not for the demands of the mandatory minimum sentence for conspiracy to murder.'
Rindyt
There are two issues -- Am I glad I read this book? Yes. Is Marshall's story believable? No.

The latter issue first. Here's the giveaway: When you are wrongly convicted of your wife's murder and have spent years in jail, you really don't indulge what are apparently still-pleasant memories of your mistress right in the beginning of the book. His wife was brutally murdered, and he can't wait to tell us about his mistress.

Now, is it a bad book? No. It's well-organized, not badly written, and shows the mind of a murderer. Really, it's worth a read.
elektron
He died in the Big House so it's all immaterial now. I liked the aliases for the kids; I always expected Mike , Steve, Ernie, Uncle Charlie and the rest of "My Three Sons" to arrive at any moment. So sad and unnecessary for everyone involved, (except for the attorneys who cleaned up), but there's nothing new there.
SmEsH
I read Tunnel Vision because I wanted to hear Robert O Marshall's side of the story. I concluded that only the most hard-core of the wrongly convicted junkies could believe his version of this saga. It is simply implausible, incredible and over the top.
First of all, each page drips with Marshall's unabashed narcissism. He's the guy who's the best at everything. The best tennis player, the best blackjack player, the best skier. All the hot women want him. He writes this story like some kind of prisoners fantasy of the high life he once lived.
But after reading the book, I came away with a new theory as to what happened here. I think Marshall steadfastly maintains his innocence because it was never his original intent to have his wife murdered. Many unhappily married men have a dark thought now and then about what life would be like if their wife were just gone and away with. A chance encounter with an out-of-towner, Robert Cumber, turned that dark thought into a sprouting seed.
Marshall met Cumber at a party in May of 1984 ( a party he didn't even want to go to, but his wife insisted he attend. ) He writes that he and Cumber sat at the bar for four hours, ' got tight ', and confided in each other their marital problems. Cumber said he knew a former Sheriff's deputy back in Louisiana.
For Marshall, the great risk assessor, who named his own boat Double Down, the wheels started turning. Who but a former law enforcement officer to be a hired hitman? Marshall proceeded to feel out the situation and decided that summer that it was worth the risk to hire somebody to kill his wife. He would be rich and rid of her and free to be with the new love of his life.
There is a saying, Nobody talks, Everybody walks. Problem was, his hit man decided to talk to save himself when the police investigation found out about him. In the end, Marshall bet it all and he lost.
The other irritating aspect of this book, was the weak substitute of people's real names. For instance, he refers to Mudman Simon as Mo Muddling. Come on, this was a death row inmate. What is he protecting? The guy's reputation?
I gave the book two stars because it was fairly interesting, if obviously a false story Marshall has had decades to manufacture. And I don't think he is a dangerous criminal or a threat to others. In fact, as he was once the big dog in the Toms River social scene, he probably is the brightest guy at New Jersey State Prison. The murder of his wife was a one time desperation deal. He rolled the dice and he lost.
Warianys
I'm innocent! The universal cry of all men (and women) on death row. Or, "ok, the evidence was videotaped and witnessed by six nuns, so NOW I'VE FOUND JESUS so don't kill me."

This man takes chutzpah to a new level. Everybody's soooo mean to him. Those nasty old prosecutors and cops who followed the evidence right to his smarmy door.

The man is guilty and turns and twists to hard to try to wiggle out that this book needs a chiropractor.
Armin
Robert O. Marshall is a sociopath. He is absolutely guilty and try as he might to convince the world of his innocence it's just not believable. Now, that isn't to say that there are certain aspects of the legal system that were highlighted in this abomination that should be reconsidered. I do not think it's in our interest as a society to have the same judge oversee a trial and all of the subsequent appeals. If only because it gives creeps like Marshall something to cry over.

I could go on and on about why he's still guilty beyond reasonable doubt, and why I believe his own words prove his guilt. But read it for yourself and see what you think.
Samardenob
A sorry attempt to explain how he was "framed" for his wifes murder. Bad lawyers, lying cops, corrupt legal system. Yeah right! He is guilty as sin and deserves to be right where he is. This book is a waste.
Carrot
An interesting book because of its author; a convicted murderer. Marshall and his late sister did a good job with the writing, but fail to answer too many questions. Why Marshall spent thousands supposedly hiring private investigators from Louisiana to check on missing money in his Harrah's account, something which is central to the story, is never really cleared up. Nor does he address why even his two eldest sons concluded that he was guilty -- not by itself proof of guilt, but worth wondering about. As literature and as debate material, ultimately disappointing.
If Rob Marshall is innocent in the death of his wife then he is the most unlucky man on earth. I mean what are the odds that a man from Lousiana,a man Marhall had sent large chunks of money to, would just happen to be in a deserted park in New Jersey after dark when Marshall just randomly pulled in there because of "tire" trouble. And then this Louisiana guy gives Marshall a little bump on the head and kills his sleeping wife for no apparent reason. Its just a little hard to believe, don't you think. I would like to see some of those crime solving psychics take a look at this case, and Scott Peterson and Jeffrey McDonald, and see what conclusion they come to.
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