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A Park Ranger's Life: Thirty-two Years Protecting Our National Parks ePub download

by Bruce W. Bytnar

  • Author: Bruce W. Bytnar
  • ISBN: 1604943459
  • ISBN13: 978-1604943450
  • ePub: 1485 kb | FB2: 1750 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Professionals & Academics
  • Publisher: Wheatmark (2010)
  • Pages: 241
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 415
  • Format: mbr rtf mobi txt
A Park Ranger's Life: Thirty-two Years Protecting Our National Parks ePub download

Life: Thirty Two Years Protecting Our National Parks, is a collection of true stories based on his experiences working in national parks. That said, thank you Mr. Bytnar for your years of service protecting our National Parks.

His new book, A Park Ranger's Life: Thirty Two Years Protecting Our National Parks, is a collection of true stories based on his experiences working in national parks. The reader will also have the opportunity to learn about very real threats to our parks and what citizens can do to assist those stewards who have the responsibility to protect our treasures found in national parks. You can check out his blog at: ww. parkrangerslife.

Drawn from the thirty-two-year career of National Park Ranger Bruce W. Bytnar, you will discover what . Bytnar, you will discover what it takes to be a park ranger, what threats to visitors and resources they deal with on a daily basis, and what you can do to help protect and preserve our national heritage.

A Park Ranger's Life book. Drawn from the thirty-two-year career of National Park Ranger Bruce W.

by Bruce W. Bytnar · data of the paperback book Park Ranger's Life: Thirty-two.

What is a park ranger's life? A wild bear who favors Kentucky Fried Chicken A fugitive wanted in eight states A dog .

A Park Ranger's Life. Bruce W. Bytnar Just three years ago, the Park Service - and 70,000 Americans - took a stand and together successfully banned extreme methods of sport hunting i. . 30 March 2015 at 09:29. l, and historic resources ional preserves.

Bruce W. Bytnar, Author of A Park Ranger's Life: Thirty Two Years Protecting Our National Parks. Gives an honest glimps into the lfe of a ranger without glorifying it or exageration. NatureGeek on LibraryThing. Best Easy Day Hikes Acadia National Park includes concise descriptions and detailed maps for easy-to-follow hikes in an area of Maine that has long captivated artists, millionaires, generations of families, and even presidents. Stroll along Ocean Path to see the.

A Park Ranger's Life: Thirty Two Years Protecting Our National Parks" is a collection of stories from the career of retired National Park Ranger Bruce Bytnar

A Park Ranger's Life: Thirty Two Years Protecting Our National Parks" is a collection of stories from the career of retired National Park Ranger Bruce Bytnar. You will find stories about bears, lost hikers, criminals, forest fires, and learn the true story of the challenges and rewards of being a National Park Ranger. A Park Ranger's Life" has received praise from those with backgrounds in our National Parks and readers interested in learning more about our parks and a career as a ranger

What is a park ranger's life? A wild bear who favors Kentucky Fried Chicken A fugitive wanted in eight states A dog that saves his owner's life Wildland firefighters battling nature and fire A ghost haunting a colonial mansion Hikers who stay lost because they think searchers calling their names are wild animals Being willing to risk your life to make our parks safe and help preserve them for the future These are just a few experiences you will read about in A Park Ranger's Life. Drawn from the thirty-two-year career of National Park Ranger Bruce W. Bytnar, you will discover what it takes to be a park ranger, what threats to visitors and resources they deal with on a daily basis, and what you can do to help protect and preserve our national heritage.
Punind
Really wanted to enjoy this book. Some of the stories are interesting and enjoyable to read. By the end I found myself just skimming the less interesting stories wanting the book to end. I have a collection of Park Ranger books I am reading right now in preparation for a late career as a seasonal park ranger (I've worked seasonally for the Park Service and Forest Service before and 20+ years in outdoor recreation management). This book is not particularly well written and the stories don't really "grab" you with their writing style. I know the job of a park ranger is not all glamorous and fun, but the complaining about supervisors got a little old after a while. Just started another Park Ranger book that so far is "grabbing" me a lot more after only a few pages. Hopefully I'll have a more favorable review of this Park Ranger story. So far, 0 for 2 with the Park Ranger books I've read thus far. This book isn't bad and has a few good stories, but it wasn't that enjoyable to read. That said, thank you Mr. Bytnar for your years of service protecting our National Parks.
Voodoosida
I enjoyed this book and read it in its entirety in one day while laid up with illness. The content was very good. The author chose some good stories to relate. Each chapter was an incident or a group of similar incidents. As a retired recreation field supervisor from a large federal land management agency I can relate to a lot of what the author is conveying and how hard it is to deal with a management organization that seems to block your best efforts to get the job done on the ground and the influence of politics on your daily workload. These two sources of stress knock the wind out of you after a couple of decades on the job when you are a field oriented, solution oriented person who isn't able to quietly accept the status quo,forced to produce paperwork that doesn't reflect what is going on on the ground. His story of the lack of support from a distant park headquarters during a major search and having to rely on a neighboring park is something I faced more than once during my career. I worked on a land unit that bordered both a national park and another land area administered by a different regional office of my own agency. My predecessors and many of my co-workers were anti National Park Service as well as being opposed to the adjacent region in the agency. One of my first moves was to establish a working relationship with the bordering park and that land unit in the different region. I ended up getting acquainted with personnel from more National Park units and the other land units of my agency in that other region. I had to make end runs, using this network of fellow natural resource professionals, around the regional headquarters of the region I was in. I found the employees of that headquarters to be useless for most of what I faced, with funding going to units closer to that headquarters for facilities and operations even though my unit had more recreation use. I accomplished a lot and ruffled a lot of feathers when I used the adjacent land unit's staff and their regional headquarters staff to accomplish a lot of what I got done. This was due to a interesting state boundary line present on my unit.

Anyway, enough of my story. I related it because I found the story of the massive search and rescue effort the author related. He had to work with and for people sitting in a distant office who didn't have a clue as to what was going on the ground and were actually impediments in the effort of accomplishing the job in the field. Some of these people actually sabotaged the author's efforts to make improvements on the ground. He related a story where the chief ranger round filed a request to be forwarded to the regional office and finding out later that the regional office never received his request. When confronted the chief ranger replied that the request was not needed. Eventually the author got ignored and received no support at all. He was not rated well nor recognized for his outstanding performance, something he received from other agencies, the adjacent national park and the regional office. He related his experience of working for a very poor manager and telling himself he would never treat anyone he supervised in a similar manner. He also related the story of a former chief ranger who had to be fired due to some form of mental illness. In the former case the manager was able to pull the wool over the park superintendent's eyes, a superintendent that did not interact with mere seasonals, the very people that could have provided observations of the chief ranger's bizzare behavior.

I once had a fellow employee sum up the condition of the agency I retired from. He put it in these terms, "what we have here is a 2 million acre ranch with all the cowboys back in the bunkhouse sitting at tables staring at computer screens."

I've read a lot of books, and still have them on my bookshelf, by retired National Park Service rangers, retirees of the U.S. Forest Service and rangers working for state park agencies. This is the first one that revealed many of the negatives in a realistic manner and did not just relate the "party line." As the Blue Ridge Parkway is a long narrow strip of land crossing a few state boundaries with much of it hundreds of miles from park headquarters that seems to be staffed by people who rarely travel it I can relate to two of the units I worked on with somewhat similar circumstances and a corresponding lack of understanding of what the real, on the ground, situation was.

The author managed to tell the stories of the negatives without sounding angry. He has managed to have a productive life after retirement. He managed to tell both the good and the bad. I felt what he felt and can relate. He ended his book with a sort of memorial to the park rangers who lost their lives during his career. I lost a cousin, a co-worker, a college classmate and a subordinate during my career as a result of on-the-job tragedies. Again I can relate to what the author is conveying.

I am amazed that the author lasted 28 years at Blue Ridge. I transferred around and worked for 4 different units in three different states trying to escape this lack of field reality syndrome. It was worse in some places than others, but substantially better during my last assignment. I managed to escape that one regional situation where the National Park Service and the units of that other regional headquarters helped me greatly, and spent my last ten years in the very region that provided me so good assistance. My performance and good judgement were rewarded and my on the ground perspective was actually solicited. I believe the author stayed at Blue Ridge because he did not want to uproot his family, but his situation was such that his family relationships were adversely affected. Sometimes one can defend something, only to jeopardize the very thing they are defending.

I tended to look past the errors as the books content was very interesting. Most of it can be attributed to the lack of comprehensive proofreading. Some of the sentence structure confused me and I had to reread the paragraphs before and after to understand what the author was conveying. The most obvious error was the inconsistency of capitalizing "National Park Service." The NPS is an agency and an entity, with its name a proper noun. At the beginning of the book he capitalizes it with a few exceptions, then ends it with capitalization being the exception. Another error is one made by many people. Smokey's middle name is not "the." It is "Smokey Bear," not Smokey T. Bear. The confusion was started by someone writing the song about the beloved bear who could not get the right rhythm until he added "the." You know, the song with the words "With a Ranger's hat and shovel and a pair of dungarees, you will find him in the forest always sniffin' at the breeze." He does admit that Smokey is the symbol of the U.S. Forest Service and not the National Park Service so I guess we will cut him some slack on this one.

I do disagree with the two reviewers who gave this a rating of two. The errors are aggravating, but the content of the story and the storytelling is sound. While I won't rate it as low as a two, the errors and sometimes poor sentence structure don't allow me to give it the otherwise rating of four.

I still highly recommend the book. If reality about an occupation many consider a dream job bothers you then find another book that speaks "the party line." Maybe a reader can better understand the saying what so many land management professional repeat "sunsets don't pay the mortgage."
It's so easy
I read loads of books about park rangers, so many in fact that my friends call me a wannabe ranger. One of the things that holds me back from just going for it and becoming one myself is the fact that I'm scared spitless to be in some of the scenarios described here. I have a great respect for these loyal, humble and very very outnumbered men and women. I live very close to the GSM and have often watched the rangers patiently dealing with a variety of situations.
While I will never become a ranger myself, I will always be impressed how well they do when they are so short-staffed.
Rrd
The chapters felt just a bit disconnected, but it was definitely worthwhile reading for those of us who cherish our great outdoors. I hadn't realized the wide variety of duties, some quite unpleasant, that a ranger encounters while performing the care of a national park. I haven't any qualms recommending this book.
Uste
Bruce Bytnar's book is packed with fascinating episodes that he experienced as a U.S. Park Ranger. Throughout its pages, he describes his career with the Park Service, as well as the various challenges he faced later on. The everyday problems that he dealt with ranged from wildlife poachers to inept supervisors and bureacracies. Despite all of this, his tone remains positive and inspiring.

"A Park Ranger's Life" was published during my Seasonal Law Enforcement Academy, and I found it to be a helpful read. Overall, the author's stories provided extremely valuable insight into my desired career field, and I was glad I had read it after working as a NPS ranger this summer. Not only does Bytnar describe the ups and downs of the work, but he also provides a detailed look into other assignments, such as working on a forest fireline.

I also enjoyed how the author described how his personal life was affected during his career. Park housing and family relationships are discussed, which are an extremely important part of working as a ranger. Few, if any, books take pause to examine this lesser-known component of how rangers live.

"A Park Ranger's Life" makes an excellent read for anyone considering working as a Protection (LE) ranger. I also enjoyed the book, since I lived near the Blue Ridge Parkway in Western North Carolina and frequented it for hiking and camping.

I am looking forward to reading it again soon.
Love Me
A good read. I recently completed my fifth season as a US Park Ranger with a 40 year gap between the fourth & fifth season. Somethings never change.
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