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Invisible Tears: The Abuse The Rebellion The Survival despite all odds ePub download

by Abigail Lawrence

  • Author: Abigail Lawrence
  • ISBN: 1449070027
  • ISBN13: 978-1449070021
  • ePub: 1545 kb | FB2: 1239 kb
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: AuthorHouse (April 19, 2010)
  • Pages: 228
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 910
  • Format: azw doc docx lrf
Invisible Tears: The Abuse The Rebellion The Survival despite all odds ePub download

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Books related to Invisible Tears: The Abuse The Rebellion The . I cheered for Allie in this book. A young child should not have to endure all this pain. Sad and painful to read, but, read it - I must!

Books related to Invisible Tears: The Abuse The Rebellion The Survival Despite All Odds. Violated: A Shocking and Harrowing Survival Story From the Notorious Rotherham Abuse Scandal. Sad and painful to read, but, read it - I must!

This is the story of Abbie's struggle to survive, the grim details of child abuse of the worst kind all told from the perspective of a little girl. As a teenager Abbie is uncontrollable.

This is the story of Abbie's struggle to survive, the grim details of child abuse of the worst kind all told from the perspective of a little girl. A Modette during the 80's revival, she finds a love of scooters, rebellion and gang life on the wild side. Dulling her pain with alcohol, drugs and promiscuity at a very young age she loses control and becomes well known to the local police. Her family eventually disowns her realizing they are unable to help

This is the story of Abbie's struggle to survive, the grim details of child abuse of the worst kind all told from the perspective of a little girl. As a teenager Abbie is uncontrollable

At a time when six-year-old Abbie needs love and security, her mother goes to the hospital and never returns. Still distraught, Abbie is passed to whoever will have her. Her new step mother subjects her to unimaginable physical, sexual and psychological torture and delivers her to local paedophiles in the entertainment business. This is the story of Abbie's struggle to survive, the grim details of child abuse of the worst kind all told from the perspective of a little girl.

This is the story of Abbie's struggle to survive, the grim details of child abuse all told from the perspective of a little girl.

ref sr 1 1?ie UTF8&qid 1294407079&sr 8-1. This is the story of Abbie's struggle to survive, the grim details of child abuse all told from the perspective of a little girl. A Modette during the 80's revival, she finds a love of scooters and gang life.

Invisible Tears (The Abuse, The Rebellion, The Survival Despite All Odds).

The Abuse, The Rebellion, The Survival Despite All Odds. Adobe EPUB eBook 47. KB. Invisible Tears.

A survivor, Abigail Lawrence is 43 years old and a pseudonym, Invisible Tears is my first book. Written to bring to public attention the horrors that some children go through and live to tell the tale. After raising my own children I decided to foster children in care. Child neglect and abuse still continues to happen today and people still look away. I wrote this book hoping it would help someone, anyone to find the courage to not look away but also help someone else to be a survivor too. Happily married with 2 grown up children and a grandson. I attempt to paint for fun and attempt to write.

The writing voice of Abigail Lawrence is so real that it is impossible to put this book . After years of all the abuse and not telling anyonw, Abbie is angry, and rebellious. She lies, cheats and steals from her family.

The writing voice of Abigail Lawrence is so real that it is impossible to put this book down. I have to say this is by far the most gripping memoir I have ever read. Aptly, she addressed abused children in the conclusion of her book: it is okay to cry; but don't give up hope; someone is bound to see the invisible tears. She has no respectk for authority and is totally out of control.

At a time when six-year-old Abbie needs love and security, her mother goes to the hospital and never returns. Still distraught, Abbie is passed to whoever will have her. Her new step mother subjects her to unimaginable physical, sexual and psychological torture and delivers her to local paedophiles in the entertainment business. During her single minded pursuit of fame Abbie's step mother stops at nothing, beating and prostituting her own children.
Wild Python
Kudos to the the author for bravely writing her story. It is indeed the most effective way of therapy, and more importantly, it makes the world aware of the horrors of child abuse.

It is difficult to imagine a woman, let alone a mother peddling their children to pedophiles for want of fortune and fame for themselves. So inconceivable!

Abbie overcame the horrors of the terrible abuse she suffered, but not without difficulties. Aside from this book, she continues to help abused children together with her husband as foster parents. Even without a diploma or any advance studies, Abbie's personal experiences are enough for me to conclude that she would be a very effective foster parent.

Aptly, she addressed abused children in the conclusion of her book: it is okay to cry; but don't give up hope; someone is bound to see the invisible tears.
Doktilar
Abbie is a 6 year old whose mother has died and her and her brother Alex are sent to stay with relatives until her estranged father comes to get them and take them home to a new stepmother.Her father drives truck during the week and "Mum" takes advantage of that by beating and torturing Abbie to the most unimaginable horrors. She pimps the little girl out to "Uncle Joe's" clients to make money to further "Mums" 'career'. She is forced to take drugs during these visits and Abbie suffers the most horrendeous torture and abuse in her young life and tells no one. She takes more abuse and beatings to cover and protect her brother Alex. The only freedom and uncondional love she finds is thru her love of horses, which she and her step-sister Molly run away to ride out in a field. Finally her father takes them away, not knowing what they have endured. and moves in with his new girlfriend Maggie. After years of all the abuse and not telling anyonw, Abbie is angry, and rebellious. She lies, cheats and steals from her family. She has no respectk for authority and is totally out of control. A Modette during the 80's, she finds scotter rallies, gangs, drugs, alcohol and sex to hide her pain and memories and tries to just belong. Finally her family has had enough and disowns her. She is forced by the Court to go to Children's Homes. She is constantly being thrown out because of her tormented "independence" and her anger and fighting. When she finally runs out of options and finds herself rejected once again and out in the streets, she calls her
brother Alex to come and bring her home, finding out that her father and Maggie are now married. After alot of "disscussion" by them, they let her stay there. She meets a young man named Lawrie when she went to listen to a band. For the first time in her life, she felt true love, a bonding and compassion. I don't want to go one and say how the book ends.
This is the most powerful and gut-wrenching book I have ever written and probably ever will again. This is Abigail's story told by herself. The first part of this book had me white knuckled, so sick to my stomach and tears rolling down my cheeks for what this little girl endured. It is very graphic and isn't sugar coated at all. Abuse is never sweet in any way. I can relate with Abigail as I too was physically, emotionally, mentally and sexually abused as a child. Certainly not to the exreme as Abbie. But abuse of any kind, leaves scars and damage for the rest of your life. Happy to say, I also got the help I needed, and finally after 26 years was able to tell someone about the abuse I suffered. I know of those "Invisible, silent tears" and the monster that lurks in the household you can't speak of. There were many times reading this story, I was sure I was I was reading about my life, thoughs and feelings. I am now a survivor instead of the victim and tell my story to anyone who will listen, hopefully to help others. Millions are still abused everyday, and children are killed. I feel everyone from 13 years and older should read this book, no matter how graphic it is, We need to hear these stories to do something about this. This will be a keeper on my Kindle, som much is highlighted. Abigail, you are brave and beautiful person. You are a true HERO!!
Ubrise
This is one of those books that is extremely hard to read, especially if you've ever lived through any type of abuse yourself. When I first started reading it, I went into it completely oblivious to what the story was about, and then I had to back out and re-read the write up to realize what I was reading was, in fact, a true story. That, immediately, changed my perspective on reading this book. You see, if this had been fiction, I probably would have stopped reading after about the first tenth. It's just that hard to read through the impacting scenes that take place in this young girl's young life. But once I realized this was supposed to be a true story, I forced myself to keep going because if this really happened to someone, she at least deserved having someone try to understand it.

And I'm glad I did because the rest of the book actually makes the journey worth it. To be honest, the first 1/3 of the book is really hard to read through. But once you hit the 35 percent mark (the Kindle is really cool for telling you exactly that), the story changes, and you start to experience a different kind of a tale, one that's no longer about abuse, but one that tells the struggle of a young girl becoming a woman who is attempting to find herself as a result of the previous abuse. What you discover is that she spends the rest of her life trying to find some sense of acceptance, whether it be acceptance from others, or just a solitary acceptance of other people and some semblance of belonging in a world that appears mean and cruel, and sometimes oblivious to the struggles of others.

I will admit there were a couple of points where I almost didn't finish it, but then perservered, a lot like Abbie pushes forward through the travails that life continues to throw at her, and in the end it really was all worth it. Someone who reads up to that first part of the book and then stops would probably be impacted as well, almost needing to read the rest of this book to get the closure that seems desired and needed through this book.

Story: 4 stars
The narrative throughout was well worth reading, and the story crafted was one that leaves an impression. It's very hard to do that with a non-fiction narrative, and there were times where I found myself comparing events with Dave Pelzer's "A Child Called It" to the point of outrageousness. The beginning of this book is really hard to read, as it goes from child abuse to child rape to continuous child exploitation, almost to where it felt like the events were trying to outshock previous events. But then you're left realizing this is a true story, so you can only feel compassion, and when the story is complete, feel anger that there are those out there who will go unpunished for the unspeakable acts they have carried out against innocent victims who have no way of ever striking back. The epilogue alone is poignant and casts its own shadows of despair on the depravity of humanity.

Voice: 3 1/2 stars
Although non-fiction, the author struggles to maintain a singular voice throughout the tale, as she sometimes juxtaposes the tale from fluidity to a sense that some prose the tale contains is still difficult to convey, making it disjointed at times. But overall, it carries forward very well and you get the sense of a very young girl's memories being relived through the prism of someone decades after the events.

Mechanics: 3 stars
The book could have used an additional edit. There are numerous spelling errors, "theres" instead of "their's", and other mechanical errors throughout. But overall, it holds up well. There were also a number of port problems from the original manuscript to the Kindle version where the justifcation of the text was off, but as someone who has worked with porting to a Kindle myself, I completely understand that problem as there are times where it happens, and no matter what you do, it just can't be fixed.

Cover: 4 stars
There are any number of different kinds of covers that could have been used to convey this story; the one chosen seems to do a pretty solid job. Having seen some really outrageous covers for some books on Kindle, it's nice to see a simple, telling piece of artwork that doesn't go out of its way to overdue an appeal to attention.

Summary: I would recommend others to read this book, keeping in mind that the first 1/3 is VERY difficult to get through.
Uthergo
This is an honest account of a woman who was physically, emotionally, and sexually abused at the hands of her stepmother. The author is very straight-forward in her storytelling and there is no moments of self-pity. This memoir is at times graphic, so if you're looking for books on child abuse because you were abused as a child, this is your fair warning. The middle of the book consists of "the rebellion" which is at times painful. As a reader, I wanted to intervene in the destructive ways in which the author rebelled as a young teenager. It is especially tragic that her 2nd stepmother and father didn't know the extent of the child's abuse and thus didn't know the motivations powering the rebellion. The last portion of the book, "the survival" really brings closure to the story. This is a strong and well-written book. I would read more of this author, if she ever writes again.
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