» » A Woman Unknown

A Woman Unknown ePub download

by Lucia Graves

  • Author: Lucia Graves
  • ISBN: 1860495532
  • ISBN13: 978-1860495533
  • ePub: 1557 kb | FB2: 1823 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Memoirs
  • Publisher: Virago Press Ltd (April 6, 2000)
  • Pages: 284
  • Rating: 4.1/5
  • Votes: 728
  • Format: lrf docx azw mobi
A Woman Unknown ePub download

A Woman Unknown book. Jul 29, 2017 A. rated it really liked it.

A Woman Unknown book. Lucia Graves was born in England in 1943, but was taken to Mallorca by her parents in 1946, after the end of WWII. Lucia Graves, daughter of the poet Robert Graves and his wife Beryl, grew. In 1967 she married a Catalan musician and settled in Spain, living mainly in Barcelona. They had three daughters. Lucia currently lives in London with her second husband.

Voices from a Spanish Life.

Последние твиты от Lucia Graves (a graves). 2019 gave us some incredible works of nature writing. There were so many good books I had to break up my annual list into four parts. Here's the conclusion of that epic list. rt-4. ответ 1 ретвит 8 отметок Нравится.

Lucia Graves, daughter of the poet Robert Graves and his wife Beryl, grew up in the beautiful village of Deia on the island of Majorca. Neither Spanish nor Catholic by birth, she nevertheless absorbed the different traditions of Spain and felt the full impact of Franco’s dictatorship through the experience of her education. Lucia found herself continually bridging the gaps between Catalan, Spanish and English, as she picked up the patterns and nuances that contain the essence of each culture.

Lucia Graves, daughter of the poet Robert Graves and his wife Beryl, grew up in the beautiful village of Deia . Voices from a Spanish Life. Books related to A Woman Unknown.

Lucia Graves, daughter of the poet Robert Graves and his wife Beryl, grew up in the beautiful village of Deia on the is. . Ghosts of Spain: Travels Through a Country's Hidden Past.

Lucia Graves, A Woman Unknown. Evelyn Waugh, Brideshead Revisited. Lucia Graves argues that Hillary Clinton’s historic securing of the presumptive Democratic presidential nomination does not equal full equality. Hartley, The Go-Between. Siegfried Sassoon, The Old Century and Seven More Years. Virginia Woolf, Orlando. Christopher Isherwood, A Meeting by the River. Rosamond Lehmann, Dusty Answer. I'm With Her Elections 2016 Femenism Identities Hillary Clinton The Guardain Guardian US Equality.

Lucia Graves (born 21 July 1943) is a writer and translator. Born in Devon, England, she is the daughter of writer Robert Graves, and his second wife, Beryl Pritchard (1915–2003). Lucia is a translator working in English and Spanish/Catalan. Her translations include the worldwide bestsellers The Shadow of the Wind, The Angel's Game, The Prisoner of Heaven, and "The Labyrinth of the Spirits", by Carlos Ruiz Zafón, and The Columbus Papers. She has translated over 30 volumes.

Lucia Graves, daughter of the poet Robert Graves and his wife Beryl, grew up in the beautiful village of Deia on the island of Majorca. Neither Spanish nor Catholic by birth, she nevertheless absorbed the different traditions of Spain and felt the full impact of Franco's dictatorship through the experience of her education. Lucia found herself continually bridging the gaps between Catalan, Spanish and English, as she picked up the patterns and nuances that contain the essence of each culture.Portraying her life as a child watching the hills lit up by bonfires on Good Friday, or, years later, walking through the haunting backstreets of the Jewish quarter of Girona, this is a captivating personal memoir which provides a first-hand account of Catalonia, where Lucia lived and raised a family. It is also a unique and perceptive appraisal of a country burdened by tradition yet coming to terms with political change as the decades moved on.
Kifer
This memoir is a knock-out. It brought to mind my own first visit to Spain's Costa Brava in the summer of 1959 at age 14: the contrasts between the physical beauty of people and landscapes and the austere menace of the guardia civil everywhere. As I read, I remembered troubling conversations I had with Catalan youth who wanted to resist the oppression, but were frightened. Graves' historical perspective has given me a clearer context for their fears and the political situation I barely understood back then.

Graves' prose is elegant, her depiction of people and places vivid, the depth of her personal revelations moving. The book drew me in and propelled me forward like a well crafted novel. I learned a good deal about Graves and her illustrious family, about Catalonia, about Spanish history, and about narrative craft. This is the first book I've read by Lucia Graves, and I look forward to reading many more.
Dozilkree
I've not read another book as lovely as this one in a long time! The estimable daughter of Robert Graves creates in beautiful prose an estimable voice of her own, while wearing warm and honorable traces of her father's literary genius; there's a common clarity, and distinction in the language. There's remarkable writing on every page; the ever so gradual reaching deep into the heart of Franco almost by not mentioning him, the destruction of her Spain from within, the passion of her love for her Catalan self, among her many selves- it's a thoroughly important book in every way. The first and last sections work like bookends and are epsecially right; Graves' subtle reflections on her relationship with her mother. This is English prose of the first order. Of course, one has a natural penchant to want to find wonderful amber things in her writing, given one's regard for the work of her father; the interesting thing is that her own voice presents itself right off, so much so that one ends praising even more the virtue of the inheritance, rather than getting lost in the echos. Her reflections on the work of a translator are beautifully woven throughout the book, and reveal a meticulous care for the possibilities of language. The ways in which she chooses to speak of her father in this memoir are memorable; at the oddest, least unexpected moment the narrative will turn and there is Robert Graves, father. This really is an irrepleaceable work of art. I commend it to everyone to read, there is something for every reader in these slender pages, and that surely expresses the consummate perfection of its parts.
Faezahn
Made we want to know about Spanish History, especially the Franco era. Hadn't realised how repressed Spanish women were.
Hiylchis
It was a whim that brought me to Lucia Graves' memoir "A Woman Unknown: Voices from a Spanish Life." I had just finished reading Carlos Ruiz Zafón's "The Shadow of the Wind," and was thoroughly entranced by its soaring lyrical prose. I noticed that the book was translated into English from Spanish and wondered whether the high quality of the prose might owe a great deal to the translator. So, I started investigating Lucia Graves' writings and discovered this exquisite memoir.

I rarely read autobiographies, but once I stared this work, I couldn't put it down--within a few pages, I felt like a spell had been cast. Soon, I was deep into a serene meditation on life--uncommon and fascinating for its vibrant Spanish twist, and subtle feminist slant. Finding this book was like suddenly discovering a refreshing mountain spring after a long summer hike: I had no idea how thirsty I was for a lush literary work dealing with the inner lives of women.

Naturally, most of the work deals with the life of the author, Lucia Graves. She is the daughter of Robert Graves, the famous English poet, novelist, biographer, essayist, scholar, and translator. She was raised on the island of Majorca, a place with a distinct cultural subset from the mainland Catalonian culture of northeastern Spain. She spoke English at home, Majorcan to the village people, and Castilian Spanish in school. Her father taught her a deep abiding love for words and language. There were dictionaries in every room of her childhood home so that the precise word might be found and discussed at any time. Later, as an adult raising her own family in a sterile modern Barcelona suburb, translation became the author's tranquil refuge from the everyday vicissitudes of life.

The book has four distinct themes. First and most importantly, we learn about the interior life and thoughts of Lucia Graves. It is important to note that there is little in this book about the life of her famous father, or the lives of her mother, siblings, children, and husband. The focus of this memoir is personal and inward at all times. Second, we learn about the lives of women who have played important roles in the author's life. She tells us about their strengths--the characteristics that allowed them to make the most of whatever adversity that befell them. Like her own life, she takes the lives of these everyday women and celebrates them. Third, we learn about the author's passion for words and for the painstaking art of translation. Finally, through the stories of the many women that make up the bulk of this book, we learn about the history of modern Spain, from the Civil War to the present day. In particular, we learn about the dynamic culture and people of Majorca and Catalonia.

There is the story of Jimena, Graves' cleaning women when she was a child growing up on Majorca; the story of Blanca, the island's midwife; and Juanita, her cleaning woman a dozen years later when she was a mother raising a family in Barcelona. Graves tells us about Olga, her childhood ballet instructor--a woman who had once achieved prima ballerina status in a major Russian ballet company, but eventually had to settle for a life of ballet instruction in a small Majorcan village. There's the story of Sister Valentina, one of the Catholic nuns who was Graves' teacher and mentor. Graves also delights us with the stories of courageous women from history: Marie Powell, long-suffering wife of John Milton and heroine of a book by her father that she translates into Spanish; and Margarida de Prades, the little-known and nearly forgotten 16th-century Queen of Catalonia. Graves also manages magically to weave into her contemporary life's story, the tale of the Greek goddess Persephone, Queen of the Underworld.

Like bookends holding the work together at the beginning and end, Graves gives us the story of her aging mother as she undergoes a minor operation in Barcelona. Once again, Graves takes this event as an opportunity to celebrate the many lives of the everyday women who were a part of this congenial, gracious, and loving hospital experience.

The Spanish legal term for a divorced woman translates as a "woman unknown." In the early 1990s, Graves became the "Woman Unknown" of the book's title when she and her husband of 26 years agreed to end their marriage. The subtitle, "Voices from a Spanish Life," aptly describe the many stories the author relates about vital Spanish women--unknown women whose lives she honors and memorializes.

This is a remarkable and richly nuanced work of literary prose. I recommend it highly, particularly to women, feminists, and others who may enjoy connecting with the inner dialogue of an astonishing, articulate, and uncommon woman of uncelebrated wisdom.
E-Books Related to A Woman Unknown: