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The Unlikely Disciple: A Sinner's Semester at America's Holiest University ePub download

by Kevin Roose

  • Author: Kevin Roose
  • ISBN: 044617842X
  • ISBN13: 978-0446178426
  • ePub: 1804 kb | FB2: 1844 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Leaders & Notable People
  • Publisher: Grand Central Publishing (March 26, 2009)
  • Pages: 336
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 587
  • Format: azw lit txt lrf
The Unlikely Disciple: A Sinner's Semester at America's Holiest University ePub download

But when Roose leaves his Ivy League confines to spend a semester at Liberty University, a conservative Baptist school in Lynchburg, Virginia, obedience is no longer optional.

But when Roose leaves his Ivy League confines to spend a semester at Liberty University, a conservative Baptist school in Lynchburg, Virginia, obedience is no longer optional. Liberty is the late Reverend Jerry Falwell's "Bible Boot Camp" for young evangelicals, his training ground for the next generation of America's Religious Right

Kevin Roose wasn't used to rules like these

Kevin Roose wasn't used to rules like these. As a sophomore at Brown University, he spent his days fitting right in with Brown's free-spirited, ultra-liberal student body. But when Roose leaves his Ivy League confines to spend a semester at Liberty University, a conservative Baptist school in Lynchburg, Virginia, obedience is no longer optional. He has written several books including The Unlikely Disciple: A Sinner's Semester at America's Holiest University and Young Money: Inside the Hidden World of Wall Street's Post-Crash Recruits. Библиографические данные. The Unlikely Disciple: A Sinner's Semester at America's Holiest University.

Liberty, which is located in Lynchburg, Virginia, is the world’s largest evangelical Christian university – a 10,000-student training ground for the next generation of America’s Religious Right. Book Excerpt: "It's midnight at Liberty University, and I'm kneeling on the floor of my dorm room, praying. This is not a particularly unusual event.

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The Unlikely Disciple : A Sinner's Semester at America's Holiest University. Kevin Roose wasn't used to rules like these. Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780446178433.

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THE UNLIKELY DISCIPLE is a book of uncommon wisdom and insight. Kevin Roose is a delightful writer, and this is a humane book. Read it and I predict you'll have less paranoia, more exposure to 'the other,' and a larger dose of Roose's generous and hopeful faith. I recommend it with enthusiasm. The Rev. Dr. Randall Balmer, Episcopal Priest and Professor of American Religious History at Barnard College, Columbia University. level-headed, nuanced, keenly observant. -Brian McLaren, author of A New Kind of Christian, A Generous Orthodoxy, and Everything Must Change. Keenly observed, funny, and compassionate.

But when Roose leaves his Ivy League confines to spend a semester at Liberty University, a conservative . Liberty is the late Reverend Jerry Falwell's Bible Boot Camp for young evangelicals, his training ground for the next generation of America's Religious Right.

8 of 10: The Unlikely Disciple, about a non-religious student’s semester at a religious university, easily kept .

8 of 10: The Unlikely Disciple, about a non-religious student’s semester at a religious university, easily kept me reading, but I couldn’t quite fall in love with it for a variety of reasons. I tend to be interested in books with unusual or unlikely premises, so this one, about Kevin Roose, a Brown student who decided to transfer to Liberty for one semester, was immediately intriguing to me. Of course, Brown is one of the most liberal, secular schools in the country, and Liberty is an extremely conservative Baptist school, so the change is a big one for Roose.

No drinking.No smoking.No cursing.No dancing.No R-rated movies.Kevin Roose wasn't used to rules like these. As a sophomore at Brown University, he spent his days drinking fair-trade coffee, singing in an a cappella group, and fitting right in with Brown's free-spirited, ultra-liberal student body. But when Roose leaves his Ivy League confines to spend a semester at Liberty University, a conservative Baptist school in Lynchburg, Virginia, obedience is no longer optional.Liberty is the late Reverend Jerry Falwell's "Bible Boot Camp" for young evangelicals, his training ground for the next generation of America's Religious Right. Liberty's ten thousand undergraduates take courses like Evangelism 101, hear from guest speakers like Sean Hannity and Karl Rove, and follow a forty-six-page code of conduct that regulates every aspect of their social lives. Hoping to connect with his evangelical peers, Roose decides to enroll at Liberty as a new transfer student, leaping across the God Divide and chronicling his adventures in this daring report from the front lines of America's culture war.His journey takes him from an evangelical hip-hop concert to choir practice at Falwell's legendary Thomas Road Baptist Church. He experiments with prayer, participates in a spring break mission trip to Daytona Beach (where he learns to preach the gospel to partying coeds), and pays a visit to Every Man's Battle, an on-campus support group for chronic masturbators. He meets pastors' kids, closet doubters, Christian rebels, and conducts what would be the last print interview of Rev. Falwell's life. Hilarious and heartwarming, respectful and thought-provoking, THE UNLIKELY DISCIPLE will inspire and entertain believers and nonbelievers alike.
mIni-Like
I absolutely adored this book!

To start, the college kid who wrote it is as gifted an essayist as any you can imagine. His prose just is wonderful to read, and draws you into his head; the style seems effortless.

The book itself is a fantastic cross between an immersion-ethnography, in which a researcher joins a society, and makes informant contacts, and a humorous travelogue. In fact, to this boy, Liberty U might as well have been on the other side of the world.

Roose writes with compassion and a wide, wide open mind. He reveals himself to be a wonderfully curious person, and spares himself nothing. Like all travelers, he makes faux pas, suffers embarrassing incidents and otherwise falls (mostly gently) over his own two feet, as only a young person can.

I'd recommend this book to just about anybody of any religious persuasion. If you are mightily religious, it will give you a perspective on yourself. If you are closer to the atheist end of the scale it will provide a peek into evangelical thought.

Mostly though, this was just plain fun to read.
blac wolf
I enjoyed every moment of this book! I went to a very strict Baptist college with more rules than Liberty, but the spirit/worldview/behavior of the students was identical. I could relate to Kevin's experience too, as I've been out of that scene for many, many years and consider myself a secularist. I appreciate how he clearly had an open mind to the experience and was not overly judgmental. I know extremists on both sides of the culture wars, and people like Kevin, who take the time to get to know people as people, are our only hope to avoid an all-out WW3. I feel sorry for students like many who Kevin described (I used to be one of them), because they only see the world as black and white. I was so judgmental of anyone who was not a believer, and I was 110% convinced I was right. What a terrible way to live.
Uickabrod
I really enjoyed this book. I have a fascination with the psychology of extreme religions and the humanity of those drawn to them. Roose's writing is accessible and entertaining. It feels like the viewpoint of a college-age student until he displays insight far beyond his years. Just when you feel like he might be veering into the judgmental, he turns it around by surprising the reader and, it appears, himself. He is respectful of those he meets. He understandably goes in with the same stereotypes held by many of us but is able to examine them as well as the fears that accompany them. Why do we believe what we believe? Does cynicism make us better people? Can you be normal, intelligent and religious? What causes an otherwise kind, loving person to treat others cruelly in the name of religion? The discussion is revealing about all of us as human beings- not just extremists.

I had absolutely no background about Liberty University prior to this other than it had been established by Jerry Falwell. Learning about the inner-workings and its culture was eye-opening. I am glad I read it.
Amarin
Kevin Roose was an aspiring writer studying at an Ivy League university when he first visited the Rev. Jerry Falwell's Thomas Road Baptist Church as part of his work assisting the journalist A.J. Jacobs with his research for The Year of Living Biblically (2007). His post-trip fascination with the student culture led him to do more research on evangelical colleges and eventually birthed the idea of traveling "abroad" for a semester as a visiting student. After receiving some practical coaching from a friend who knew his current agnosticism and limited Quaker background were inadequate preparations for the task, Kevin transferred from Brown University to Liberty University and lived "undercover" as an evangelical undergraduate for the Spring 2007 semester. The book offers an honest, fresh, and objective look inside one of the most well known evangelical universities.

The Unlikely Disciple is a must read for anyone who wants to know what life is really like at Liberty University or for those seeking to better understand American evangelicalism. Kevin's experiences as a nineteen year old sophomore include living in a dorm, taking introductory classes, attending chapel, dating, singing in the Thomas Road Baptist Church choir, interviewing Rev. Falwell for the student paper, and learning to live according to a forty-six page code of conduct known as "The Liberty Way." While he does report the oddities unique to the environment, such as being counseled not to masturbate or attending a spring break mission trip where he must witness to strangers in an attempt to "save" them, he focuses on providing an accurate understanding of the student culture. Kevin is pleasantly surprised to learn that the university is more academically rigorous than he anticipated and that most students are not as radically fundamental about their worldview as the media portrays. Though he does not convert to evangelical Christianity, Kevin does gain a new respect for those who affiliate with evangelical traditions and finds he now "believes in a divine presence more often than not" (p.282).
Qusserel
I read this book when my oldest son was seriously considering attending Liberty. He ended up not going to Liberty, but it certainly was not because of this book. I find it to be a fascinating read, and actually laughed out loud several times. The idea behind the book was brilliant, and Roose is a talented writer. I know that Liberty disagrees with several accounts in the book, but I found it to be overall very complimentary of Liberty. No place is perfect, but Liberty is a wonderful Christian school, and I can't imagine a more accurate and unbiased view of the school than through this book.

If you are able to put yourself in the author's perspective, you will have a greater appreciation for what he experiences. As you read the book, you will be on the edge of your seat with anticipation with how Roose's experience will end!
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