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The Road Back to Paris (Modern Library) ePub download

by A.J. Liebling

  • Author: A.J. Liebling
  • ISBN: 0679602488
  • ISBN13: 978-0679602484
  • ePub: 1872 kb | FB2: 1723 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Leaders & Notable People
  • Publisher: Modern Library; Modern Library ed edition (April 1, 1997)
  • Pages: 468
  • Rating: 4.1/5
  • Votes: 232
  • Format: doc rtf azw txt
The Road Back to Paris (Modern Library) ePub download

The book includes the essays The Road Back to Paris, Mollie and Other War Pieces .

The book includes the essays The Road Back to Paris, Mollie and Other War Pieces, Normandy Revisited, as well as his uncollected war journalism. The journalist and sportswriter William "Bill" Heinz called Liebling "the best essayist. The Library of America selected Liebling's 1955 New Yorker story The Case of the Scattered Dutchman for inclusion in its two-century retrospective of American True Crime writing, published in 2008. a b Liebling, AJ (1986), Between the Meals, an Appetite for Paris, North Point Press, p. 63, ISBN 978-0-86547-236-5, LCCN 85-73123. Lyons, Louis M. (10 July 1949). A Critic of the Press: Mink and Red Herring".

Originally published in 1944, The Road Back to Paris comprises dispatches from France .

Originally published in 1944, The Road Back to Paris comprises dispatches from France, England, and North Africa that A. J. Liebling filed with The New Yorker during the Second World War. The magazine sent Liebling to Paris in 1939, hoping that he could replicate in wartime France his brilliant reporting of New York life.

For 28 years the work of A. Liebling embodied and perfected the personal-experience style of journalism that made . Essays describe everyday life in wartorn Europe, and depict the experiences of the ordinary American soldier fighting the war. Liebling embodied and perfected the personal-experience style of journalism that made the the New Yorker magazine famous.

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The Road Back to Paris (1944) narrates Liebling’s .

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The modern library - a list of current titles. The Education of Henry Adams. The Road Back to Paris. The Executioner’s Song. Death in Venice & Seven Other Stories.

Originally published in 1944, The Road Back to Paris comprises dispatches from France, England, and North Africa that A. J. Liebling filed with The New Yorker during the Second World War. The magazine sent Liebling to Paris in 1939, hoping that he could replicate in wartime France his brilliant reporting of New York life. Liebling succeeded triumphantly, concentrating on writing the individual soldier's story to illuminate the larger picture of the European theater of the war and the fight for what Liebling felt was the first priority of business: the liberation of his beloved France. The Modern Library has played a significant role in American cultural life for the better part of a century. The series was founded in 1917 by the publishers Boni and Liveright and eight years later acquired by Bennett Cerf and Donald Klopfer. It provided the foundation for their next publishing venture, Random House. The Modern Library has been a staple of the American book trade, providing readers with affordable hardbound editions of important works of literature and thought. For the Modern Library's seventy-fifth anniversary, Random House redesigned the series, restoring as its emblem the running torch-bearer created by Lucian Bernhard in 1925 and refurbishing jackets, bindings, and type, as well as inaugurating a new program of selecting titles. The Modern Library continues to provide the world's best books, at the best prices.For a complete list of titles, see the inside of the jacket. Despite his ill health and bad eyesight, Liebling went on patrol, interviewed soldiers, fled Paris and returned after D-Day, was shot at in North Africa and bombed in the blitz in London. Into this chaos, as his biographer Raymond Sokolov comments, "he brought himself, a fiercely committed Francophile with a novelist's skill for crystallizing his day-to-day experiences into a profound chronicle of a 'world knocked down.' "
ChallengeMine
The first few essays are kind of weirdly pompous but once he gets overseas, the writing is really amazing. It was a really unique look at life during WWII. It felt more personal than most accounts of the war.
Forey
A J Liebling was a man who seized life and experience when writing from Paris and when Paris fell, he left town in tears. This is a collection of his articles on the long but inevitable road back to Paris. He wrote for the New Yorker and his articles in this book are crafted to maximize impact with limited space and word count. His prose is efficient, clear and moving as he so clearly felt this was a personal insult to the world.
Faegal
It was very interesting
Gunos
Legendary journalist Joe Liebling knows and loves food, boxing and New York City, but this book focuses on his coverage of WWII for the New Yorker magazine. The three main sections employ a boxing metaphor: "The World Knocked Down" shows Liebling in France during the early days of the war. The main thrust is the writer's astonishment that the country which had been virtually synonymous with culture was so easily defeated by German invaders - again. "The World on One Knee" focuses on the Battle of the Atlantic and describes a fairly tedious sea voyage on a Norwegian oil tanker. The relevant point is that only by virtue of many such voyages was America able to come to the aid of its European allies. "The World Gets Back Up" takes Liebling to North Africa, where he reports on Allied political failures, and concludes with the defeat of a German brigade by an American one, which Joe presents as evidence of the certainty of the Axis' eventual defeat.

Readers will love Liebling's prose style and his knack with the anecdote, although his habit of dropping French and other foreign phrases into his writing may strike some as too affecting and even pretentious. Of course this is journalism, not fiction, so it's really not so much story as history (it turns out the fascists did it) but Liebling recounts the stories of individuals with such detail that we feel for their personal fates within the larger context. Given the seriousness of the subject matter, it's no surprise that this book isn't nearly as much fun as some of Joe's writings on lighter topics, and since we never get very close to the actual fighting, there's not a lot of action either. World War II buffs might enjoy this book as an insight into the war's quieter moments, but the real audience among today's readers should be aspiring journalists, who can learn much from the master's eye for detail, his ear for a good anecdote, and his nose for the real story. Those readers should consider this a five star selection.
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