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Bella Abzug: How One Tough Broad from the Bronx Fought Jim Crow and Joe McCarthy, Pissed Off Jimmy Carter, Battled for the Rights of Women and ... Planet, and Shook Up Politics Along the Way ePub download

by Suzanne Braun Levine,Mary Thom

  • Author: Suzanne Braun Levine,Mary Thom
  • ISBN: 0374299528
  • ISBN13: 978-0374299521
  • ePub: 1225 kb | FB2: 1950 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Leaders & Notable People
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux; First Edition edition (November 27, 2007)
  • Pages: 352
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 436
  • Format: rtf docx txt lrf
Bella Abzug: How One Tough Broad from the Bronx Fought Jim Crow and Joe McCarthy, Pissed Off Jimmy Carter, Battled for the Rights of Women and ... Planet, and Shook Up Politics Along the Way ePub download

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. A remarkable work of oral history a fond, provocative testament to a remarkable life. Remember how after 9/11 there were changes made to the Freedom of Information Act which took away some of the American citizen's privacies? Bella Abzug was one of the forces behind the more rigid rulings that protected the American citizen, a natural response to what the Nixon Administration had been doing.

Suzanne Braun Levine and Mary Thom, Bella Abzug: How One Tough Broad from the Bronx Fought Jim Crow and Joe McCarthy, Pissed Off Jimmy Carter, Battled for the Rights of Women and Workers

Suzanne Braun Levine and Mary Thom, Bella Abzug: How One Tough Broad from the Bronx Fought Jim Crow and Joe McCarthy, Pissed Off Jimmy Carter, Battled for the Rights of Women and Workers,. Planet, and Shook Up Politics Along the Way, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2007; ISBN 0-374-29952-8, pp. 49–56.

Planet, and Shook Up Politics Along the Wa. And I have to say, I really liked the WAY the story was told - all quotes by those around her telling how things really were happening

Planet, and Shook Up Politics Along the Way. b. Suzanne Braun Levine and Mary Thom are both nationally recognized authorities on women's issues. And I have to say, I really liked the WAY the story was told - all quotes by those around her telling how things really were happening. Made me think a I always had a very negative impression about Bella Abzug as a bra burning extremist that most feminists shied away from.

Suzanne Braun Levine, Mary Thom. An oral biography of the influential Bella Abzug charts her more than fifty-year career as an activist, congresswoman, social leader, and champion of the disenfranchised and powerless, detailing her diverse roles during the Civil Rights and anti-Vietnam War movements of the 1960s, the feminist revolution of the 1970s and 1980s, and the 1990s environmental awareness and economic.

The Chicago Sun-Times called the book about Ms. Abzug a bizarre, plodding, Friars Club roast

The Chicago Sun-Times called the book about Ms. Abzug a bizarre, plodding, Friars Club roast. Ms. Thom arrived at Ms. magazine convinced of the need for more scrutiny of lawmakers and their views on issues like abortion and birth control. She developed a system of grading politicians that quickly became one of the magazine’s most popular features. Women's Media Center, via Associated Press.

Battling Bella" who fought for women's rights, civil rights, gay rights, the State of Israel, and so much more.

Here's everything you need to know about "Battling Bella" who fought for women's rights, civil rights, gay rights, the State of Israel, and so much more. At age 11, she joined a group called Kvutzah, saying: We sang songs, danced the hora, studied socialism and communal living and the history of Israel. Few people understood what we meant by the establishment of a homeland for the Jews. Later, she would join Hashomer Hatzair, a labor Zionist youth group.

Levine, Suzanne Marin and Mary Thom, eds. Bella Abzug: How One Tough Broad from the Bronx Fought Jim Crow and Joe McCarthy, Pissed Off Jimmy Carter, Battled for the Rights of Women and Workers, Rallied against War and for the Planet, and Shook Up Politics. Bella Abzug: How One Tough Broad from the Bronx Fought Jim Crow and Joe McCarthy, Pissed Off Jimmy Carter, Battled for the Rights of Women and Workers, Rallied against War and for the Planet, and Shook Up Politics Along the Way. New York: Farrar, Strauss, and Giroux, 2007; Abzug, Bella. Bella! Ms. Abzug Goes to Washington.

Bella Abzug: How One Tough Broad from the Bronx Fought Jim Crow and Joe McCarthy, Pissed Off Jimmy Carter, Battled for the Rights of Women and Workers,. Planet, and Shook Up Politics Along the Way, authored by Suzanne Braun Levine and Mary Thom, published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2007, (ISBN 0374299528).

Bella Abzug: How One Tough Broad From the Bronx Fought Jim Crow and Joe McCarthy, Pissed off Jimmy Carter, Battled for the Rights of Women and Workers .

Bella Abzug: How One Tough Broad From the Bronx Fought Jim Crow and Joe McCarthy, Pissed off Jimmy Carter, Battled for the Rights of Women and Workers, Rallied Against War and for the Planet, and Shook Up Politics Along the Way by Suzanne Braun Levine and Mary Thom. Find this Pin and more on I am woman! by Anne Peach. Planet, and Shook Up Politics Along the Way. Oral History Women's History Jimmy Carter Pissed Off Levine Battle Mother Courage Politics War. More information.

"I've been described as a tough and noisy woman, a prize fighter, a man-hater, you name it. They call me Battling Bella, Mother Courage, and a Jewish mother with more complaints than Portnoy. There are those who say I'm impatient, impetuous, uppity, rude, profane, brash, and overbearing. Whether I'm any of those things, or all of them, you can decide for yourself. But whatever I am--and this ought to made very clear--I am a very serious woman." For more than fifty years, Bella Abzug championed the powerless and disenfranchised, as an activist, congresswoman, and leader in every major social initiative of her time—from Zionism and labor in the 40s to the ban-the-bomb efforts in the 50s, to civil rights and the anti-Vietnam War movements of the 60s, to the women’s movement in the 70s and 80s, to enviromnemtal awareness and economic equality in the 90s. Her political idealism never waning, Abzug gave her final public speech before the U.N. in March 1998, just a few weeks before her death. Presented in the voices of both friends and foes, of those who knew, fought with, revered, and struggled alongside her, this oral biography will be the first comprehensive account of a woman who was one of our most influential leaders. Suzanne Braun Levine and Mary Thom are both nationally recognized authorities on women’s issues. Most recently, Levine is the author of Inventing the Rest of Lives and Thom is the author of Inside Ms. Bella Azbug said, "I've been described as a tough and noisy woman, a prize fighter, a man-hater, you name it. They call me Battling Bella, Mother Courage, and a Jewish mother with more complaints than Portnoy. There are those who say I'm impatient, impetuous, uppity, rude, profane, brash, and overbearing. Whether I'm any of those things, or all of them, you can decide for yourself. But whatever I am—and this ought to made very clear—I am a very serious woman." For more than fifty years, Bella Abzug championed the powerless and disenfranchised, as an activist, congresswoman, and leader in every major social initiative of her time—from Zionism and labor in the 40s to the ban-the-bomb efforts in the 50s, to civil rights and the anti-Vietnam War movements of the 60s, to the women’s movement in the 70s and 80s, to environmental awareness and economic equality in the 90s. Her political idealism never waning, Abzug gave her final public speech before the U.N. in March 1998, just a few weeks before her death. Presented in the voices of both friends and foes, of those who knew, fought with, revered, and struggled alongside her, this oral biography will be the first comprehensive account of a woman who was one of our most influential leaders. "Abzug was certainly a major player in our change in attitudes in the second part of the past century [and] Suzanne Braun Levine and Mary Thom give us a fascinating glimpse into [an] inspirational but undeniably peculiar period that is receding, all too quickly, into the past."—Carolyn See, The Washington Post "A fabulous read about a breed of politician now largely extinct . . . Levine and Thom have crafted a history that brings to life one of the great political personalities of the twentieth century."—Alice Echols, Bookforum  "Abzug was certainly a major player in our change in attitudes in the second part of the past century [and] Suzanne Braun Levine and Mary Thom give us a fascinating glimpse into [an] inspirational but undeniably peculiar period that is receding, all too quickly, into the past."—Carolyn See, The Washington Post  "[A] fluid, sharply edited book . . . Abzug was a force of nature, and the stories about her are consistently feisty."—Jon Dolan, Time Out New York  "During this 'historic' election year, let me just say what so many of us are thinking: I miss Bella Abzug. And Barbara Jordan. What I would give to see Bella toss one of her signature striped, oversized hats into the presidential ring. Or to hear Barbara Jordan debate an comer, to hear her intone the preamble of the constitution as she reminds us of the true meanings of 'equality' and 'justice.' If only big, bold Bella or big, bold Barbara were here to run . . . and win. So far my only solace has been the recently published oral history of Bella . . . The book is edited by Suzanne Braun Levine and Mary Thom, women with long histories of activism and scholarship in and about the women’s movement in America."—Susan Davis,The News & Observer (Raleigh)  "This is like being a fly on the wall for some of the most important moments in political history over the past fifty years. Being a part of this conversation makes you not just appreciate Bella's fierceness, but want to emulate it."—Amy Richards, co-author of Manifesta and former colleague of Bella"Bella was a radical, patriotic and passionate about transforming the system—with the courage to work from outside and the patience to work from inside. Like her life, this book radiates drama, humor, tactical brilliance—and heart. Bella mattered. So does this book."—Jane Fonda"Stumped about what to do in this messed up world? Just get to know Bella Abzug, one of the most important activists of the twentieth century. By gathering the reminiscences of people who lived their personal and political lives right along with her—and sometimes had the courage to break the rules alongside her too—the authors have created a memoir in many voices that captures the suspense, humor, and contradictions of this great woman. Read this book and then ask yourself, What would Bella do?"—Gloria Steinem"Bella Abzug didn't vet her opinions through consultants and polls. She wasn't a highly orchestrated pre-fab candidate sprung from a well-oiled multi-million dollar corporate machine. She was the real deal. Pro-peace, pro-worker, pro-women. Angry, authentic, grassroots, alienating and alive. And, she actually got elected. This book is a call to all of us, but particularly those in government to run and lead through their own moral steam rather than blowing more hot air."—Eve Ensler"Bella Abzug is an important, inspiring piece of history. There's nothing we need more right now than this kind of cogent reminder of what it takes to make change in the halls of power—and what's at stake if we don't."—Lisa Jervis, co-founder of Bitch magazine
Dozilkree
The content of this book captures the life of Bella Abzug well. The format is a bit unusual. It is more of a chronological organization without a clear thesis or principle of organization. It follows a narrative format with quotes from many people who knew her well at different stages of her life. If you read the whole thing, it gives a great picture of her life, but you have to draw your own conclusions about the lessons it contains.
Unsoo
This book had an interesting concept. Instead of a narrative outlining the subject's life, the author interwove interviews from people that knew the subject. Included were interviews from relatives, friends, enemies and the subject herself. Different timelines were given with interviews relevant to the time period and subject matter. It is worth a read particularly if you remember Bella Abzug.
Xcorn
I do not recollect another time that I read a book so fast. I loved the chronology that preface each chapter - it puts context into American history and Bella. There are all sorts of women and men talking. Some I know of and others I don't. Highly educational. That Bella was a force in many laws that I have not known before. The credit belongs to Bella.
Aurizar
Amazing woman of my time. Book gets into all the corners and paths in her life. Well written.
lolike
Loved this book
Wooden Purple Romeo
Bella Abzug: How One Tough Brod from the Bronx Fought Jim Crow, Pissed Off Jimmy Carter, Battled for the Rights of Women and Workers, Rallied Against War and for the Planet, and Shook Up Politics Along the Way an oral history by Suzanne Braun Levine and Mary Thom is a book about a political dynamo who fought for changes that we see everywhere but did not realize were the result of her often strident voice. For instance, did you know that the way curbsides are dipped down for easier wheelchair access is the result of legislation she pushed through Congress? And that she was the first to demand President Nixon be impeached? Known for her flamboyant hats and her very big personality, Bella Abzug is one of those leaders who simply would not be ignored. She also would not back down and some of her positions created rifts within her own demographic so while she fought for Civil Rights for homosexuals, some feminists and minorities were offended and didn't agree with that gays and lesbians should be included.

I know a lot of people outside of New York probably haven't heard of Bella Abzug. I grew up in her district, her face iconic in my childhood, and I distinctly recall stuffing envelopes for her in a storefront campaign office in the village. No, I never met her but it seemed very mature and necessary for me, an eight-year-old child, to be sitting side-by-side with adults, doing something that really mattered.

Of course, I had no political awareness and couldn't have told you a thing about Abzug's politics. I could assume she was against the Vietnam War because, as far as I knew, everyone knew that war, particularly that war, was wrong and we needed to bring our boys home. And she was a woman so I probably surmised she was a feminist. But it wasn't until reading this book that I understood how strident and divisive she truly was. Wonderfully so because she had strong beliefs and a fearless inability to back down.

I love the way this book is organized. There are very brief sections, few spanning more than a paragraph or two, written in a variety of voices. Abzug's own words are italicized while those of others are preceded by their name and then they share their stories. Everyone from family to employees, from political admirers and opponents are represented on the page. This is not an homage to a remarkable woman so much as it is a faceted look at her impact on politics, feminism, and so much more.

Bella Abzug was born at the right time and had the internal drive and vision to have an effect. Some of the observations make her human, like her dislike of dogs. Others put her in a context that informs her adult personality, like when her father died and she insisted on saying Kaddish for him although, traditionally this would have been done only by the eldest son. She is not easily defined and some of the stories shared reveal a complicated and complex woman, a woman who is conservative enough to not want to know about homosexuality but is willing to fight for homosexual rights and who wears an old fashioned girdle while standing up for equal rights for women.

Remember how after 9/11 there were changes made to the Freedom of Information Act which took away some of the American citizen's privacies? Bella Abzug was one of the forces behind the more rigid rulings that protected the American citizen, a natural response to what the Nixon Administration had been doing.

There are also some stories shared that break the heart or frustrate altogether. That anyone would be so vulgar as to call her "the Beast of Buchenwald" is so far beyond my comprehension that I had to close the book altogether for a few minutes to calm myself (162). She wasn't in politics to make friends but to create change and this is apparent as the editors have the good sense to share the darker and less kind opinions of some of the people who worked side-by-side with Abzug. If she wasn't easy to get along with, she made few apologies (although there is a story shared of her approaching someone years after the fact and admitting that she was wrong).

The strength of this book lies in its lack of synthesis. Rather than try to create a linear biography, the editors wisely, perhaps even brilliantly, chose to let the speakers speak for themselves so when Abzug writes about a particular moment in her italicized sections, these are immediately followed by one or more stories from others that either collaborate, elaborate, or even contradict what she said. What a clever way to show how faceted she herself was, a tour de force in politics at a time when there was so much political foment.

I would highly, even urgently, recommend this book to any young feminist who wants a better understanding of the more contemporary political roots of the movement. Abzug worked with Steinam and Friedan, with more or less cooperation. Before her own political career, she campaigned for Robert Kennedy and, after Malcolm X was assassinated, sold her house to his widow and children so they would have a safe and integrated community in which to live. Agree with her politics or don't, she was an interesting woman and this book makes her fascination understandable.
The_NiGGa
It's an inspiring, but ultimately dynamic true-to-life account--of how one woman really did make a difference in this world. Accomplishing this difference pre-internet era and before 'packaged candidate' times is what keeps the reader perpetually hooked.

An outsider in every sense of the term starting from her childhood, Bella Savitsky Abzug crusaded for her causes merely because it was the right thing to do. She was not expecting fame or fortune to come from this work, she saw injustice and wanted to correct it.

After admittance to the bar, she went down south to defend African Americans, motivated by that sense of fairness rather than money.

This work and other even caught the eye of Richard M. Nixon, placing her on his infamous 'enemies list', something which she undoubtedly took as an honor. Her being noticed by the system meant that the cages were being rattled and they knew their time was up. The only machine which she was a member of was her own. Throughout each battle, her devoted husband Martin was proud to have supported her, not at all ashamed to 'Bella's husband'.

One can only imagine what the outlets attacking Hillary for being a 'nutcracker' would have said about Bella. She too enjoyed being a wife and a mother. But she also transgresed established gender norms at seemingly every turn. Even when elected to public office, she did not quietly fall in line with what the rest of the Party electorate expected her to go along with.

It's definently a holiday gift item to inspire the women in our lives. But guys also wanting a solid example of what quality community organizing actually is need to get this book.
This is my first Amazon review. I felt I had to write a review for this wonderful book. On one hand, this is an inspiring account of the passion and vigor that catalyzed the civil rights and feminist movements in this country (in stark contrast to much of the hollow rhetoric these days). On the other, it is an entertaining and poignant portrayal of an incredibly complicated character in American history. The form of the book, something of a round table discussion between Abzug and those who knew her, helps the reader to get a sort of 360 degree history with multiple views of single events. It is a finely wrought and powerful portrayal of Abzug and of the history of our country. I hope particularly that young women (and men) will read it and be inspired.
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