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What It Is Like to Go to War ePub download

by Karl Marlantes

  • Author: Karl Marlantes
  • ISBN: 0802119921
  • ISBN13: 978-0802119926
  • ePub: 1846 kb | FB2: 1298 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Leaders & Notable People
  • Publisher: Atlantic Monthly Press; First Edition edition (August 30, 2011)
  • Pages: 272
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 484
  • Format: azw txt rtf mobi
What It Is Like to Go to War ePub download

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Karl Marlantes has written a staggeringly beautiful book on combat-what it feels like, what the consequences are and above all, what . Brutally realistic and honest. It was uncomfortably easy to go back there with him in the book

Karl Marlantes has written a staggeringly beautiful book on combat-what it feels like, what the consequences are and above all, what society must do to understand it. In my eyes he has become the preeminent literary voice on war of our generation. He is a natural storyteller and a deeply profound thinker who not only illuminates war for civilians, but also offers a kind of spiritual guidance to veterans themselves. It was uncomfortably easy to go back there with him in the book. Not sure I would have the same reaction if I were reading it just as a novel.

It textures Karl Marlantes’s war novel Matterhorn, published last year, and provides the mournful keynote to his . No reader can judge its success.

It textures Karl Marlantes’s war novel Matterhorn, published last year, and provides the mournful keynote to his new nonfiction book, What It Is Like to Go to War. For Marlantes it isn’t a bath but the lack of one that becomes the symbol of betrayal. Just returned from Vietnam, the Marine lieutenant goes home with Maree Ann, a former girlfriend who meets him at the airport. The entire book, which Marlantes explains he wrote primarily to come to terms with my own experience of combat, resides at the same deeply personal level.

I was going to get my guys that commendation no matter what. I couldn’t go to a party without thinking of my Marine friends, terrified in the jungle while I was hanging on to Meg’s very beautiful warm body with one arm and holding a pint of bitter in the other. This may seem pretty trivial to a civilian reader, decades after the war, but the reader must realize how much the ideal of professionalism and honor means to the military. Believe me, it is not trivial to lie in a report. Oxford, a place I’d happily be buried in should I happily die there someday, became a cold gray limbo between black choices.

He leaves no doubt as to what it is like. Generations ago, young men were sent to war by old men who had forgotten what it was like. That is no longer the case. The briefest biography of Karl Marlantes immediately informs the reader his books will not be ordinary fare. A National Merit Scholar, Marlantes attended Yale University. He attended Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar, interrupted by his service in Vietnam as a young Lieutenant. There he was awarded the Bronze Star, the Navy Cross, and twelve Air Medals. Our military has grown successively younger.

In his new book, Karl Marlantes deals with warriors past and present, giving advice to new soldiers to become "conscious . Karl Marlantes is part of that preservationist, introspective, phenomenon

In his new book, Karl Marlantes deals with warriors past and present, giving advice to new soldiers to become "conscious warriors". Karl Marlantes is part of that preservationist, introspective, phenomenon. Thirty years after he left the war, he wrote the much-acclaimed novel Matterhorn, a fictional work based on his year in combat. His second book, What It Is Like to Go to War, is a powerful, non-fiction complement. Marlantes says Matterhorn was fiction, written for him and his comrades. Having read both books, I am convinced that Matterhorn blurs the line between fiction and memoir, and that What It Is Like to Go to War is an almost required companion piece to Matterhorn.

Marlantes survived, but like many of his brothers in arms, he has spent the last forty years dealing with his war experience

Marlantes survived, but like many of his brothers in arms, he has spent the last forty years dealing with his war experience. In his first work of nonfiction, Marlantes takes a deeply personal and candid look at what it is like to experience the ordeal of combat, critically examining how we might better prepare our soldiers for war. Just as Matterhorn is already acclaimed a classic of war literature, What It Is Like to Go to War is set to become required reading for anyone-soldier or civilian-interested in this visceral and all too essential part of the human experience.

Marlantes survived, but like many of his brothers in arms, he has spent the last forty years dealing with his war .

Marlantes survived, but like many of his brothers in arms, he has spent the last forty years dealing with his war experience.

From the author of the award-winning, best-selling novel Matterhorn, comes a brilliant nonfiction book about warIn 1968, at the age of twenty-three, Karl Marlantes was dropped into the highland jungle of Vietnam, an inexperienced lieutenant in command of a platoon of forty Marines who would live or die by his decisions. Marlantes survived, but like many of his brothers in arms, he has spent the last forty years dealing with his war experience. In What It Is Like to Go to War, Marlantes takes a deeply personal and candid look at what it is like to experience the ordeal of combat, critically examining how we might better prepare our soldiers for war. Marlantes weaves riveting accounts of his combat experiences with thoughtful analysis, self-examination, and his readings—from Homer to The Mahabharata to Jung. He makes it clear just how poorly prepared our nineteen-year-old warriors are for the psychological and spiritual aspects of the journey.Just as Matterhorn is already being acclaimed as acclaimed as a classic of war literature, What It Is Like to Go to War is set to become required reading for anyone—soldier or civilian—interested in this visceral and all too essential part of the human experience.
Brick my own
As a fellow Vietnam Vet I found a lot of truth in what he wrote. Brutally realistic and honest. It was uncomfortably easy to go back there with him in the book. Not sure I would have the same reaction if I were reading it just as a novel. I felt flashes of anger and sadness as I read the book because I was really reading about myself in many of the passages. Not sure why I rated it 4 instead of 5 - probably more due to too many negative memories about anything associated with Vietnam than anything to do with the book itself.
Onaxan
Should be required reading for every soldier, sailor, airman, or marine before they sign on the dotted line to join the military. Also, EVERY politician should sign an affidavit attesting that s/he read this attentively and understands the lessons (and responsibilities) outlined here. Come to think of it, if you are planning to utter the words "thank you for your service" you must first read this book, AND the author's novel "Matterhorn" so that you understand what service really, really means before you say those words. Thank you Karl Marlantes. Thank you very, very much.
Faegal
This book was written by a Marine Lt who volunteered for combat duty in the Vietnam war. He, like so many combat veterans before and after him, came home with unknown mental problems that affected both himself in his career, and his wife and children. I can relate to his story because I was a child of a WWII combat veteran that had what we now know is PTSS. It affected me and all my siblings and our mother. It was a terrible childhood for all of us, and we are still dealing with the after affects of the unholy way in which we were raised. We still tip toe around for fear of raising the ire of our father and releasing the beast within him, even though he is long dead. War truly is bad for children and all other living things, more than just the soldier is affected. the families, and society in general pays a great cost of the mental wounds these poor men bring home from the wars with them. The author gives spiritual insight into controling these demons before going into war, and gives suggestions on how our military can give these men and women tools to deal with unresolved anger and pain and nightmares. If you are a child of war, or are considering joining the military, please, please, read this book and try to follow some of the spiritual guidelines offered so you can deal with what has happened to you already, or is going to happen to you when you have to do the most unspeakable thing we ask of our children, taking the life of another human. Even if you are not affected by war in any way, (that's just what YOU think, I assure you, we are all affected by our countries wars) you should read this book and see what a marine volunteer has to say about the cavalier way in which our "leaders" are so non chalant about committing our children to war. In his opinion, nothing short of the loss of our freedoms is reason enough to go to war. Oil, land, etc, to enrich the already fabulously wealthy is an unjustifiable reason to kill even one of our children. Whether you are a Hawk, or a Dove, if you are a person of morals, you will find this book a breath of fresh air, telling us the truth about war. It offers suggestions on our now popular mantra, "To bring Democracy to the world". Not every country is ready, or even deserving of the lives of our children to attempt to bring them Democracy. It tells us to demand of our "leaders" the knowledge of whether the war will require just a short time in combat and then all boots out, or whether it will require the committment of thousands of soldiers for decades to change the thinking of people whose minds are three or four centuries behind the rest of the civilized world. Please DEMAND your child read this book before he/she joins the military! There are other, better ways to serve mankind than to kill people and destroy countries for our "leaders" to then give contracts to their buddies to make trillions of dollars on rebuilding what we have just destroyed. We all need to open our eyes. War is NOT glamorous.
Tygralbine
This is a beautiful book. Thoughtful, personal, well researched, and superbly written. If you haven't read Matterhorn yet, read that book first, wonder for an hour or two about how much of that story actually happened, or could have happened, then read What It Is Like to Go to War. It could be the novel's companion guide, since virtually every scene that the author describes in Matterhorn is based on his personal experience in Vietnam. At the risk of slighting the author's creative ability (which is considerable) I have to believe after reading this book that Matterhorn pretty much wrote itself.
I found that the books title, What It Is Like To Go To War, is somewhat misleading. It is much more than a first person description of leading a charge in combat, or watching your fellow soldiers get wounded and killed. That's all in there, but it is mixed in with an examination of the whole psychology of being a soldier, before, during and after combat. It discusses leadership, motivation, politics and personalities. It is about what it takes to be a modern warrior, the scars fighting leaves behind, and what it takes to return to normal after combat is over. The insight and scholarship in this work are first rate. You will come away having learned something about human nature under the most extreme conditions, and acquire a new respect for our fighting men (at least most of our fighting men). It should be required reading for all US officers.
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