» » Lone Survivor: The Eyewitness Account of Operation Redwing and the Lost Heroes of SEAL Team 10

Lone Survivor: The Eyewitness Account of Operation Redwing and the Lost Heroes of SEAL Team 10 ePub download

by Kevin T. Collins,Patrick Robinson,Marcus Luttrell

  • Author: Kevin T. Collins,Patrick Robinson,Marcus Luttrell
  • ISBN: 160024131X
  • ISBN13: 978-1600241314
  • ePub: 1548 kb | FB2: 1562 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Leaders & Notable People
  • Publisher: Hachette Audio; Abridged edition (July 3, 2007)
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 946
  • Format: mobi lit rtf mbr
Lone Survivor: The Eyewitness Account of Operation Redwing and the Lost Heroes of SEAL Team 10 ePub download

Petty Officer Marcus Luttrell joined the United States Navy in March 1999 .

Petty Officer Marcus Luttrell joined the United States Navy in March 1999, became a combat-trained Navy SEAL in January 2002, and has served in Afghanistan and Iraq. The alpha males and their domain - and I am very grateful for them and their sacrifice. They killed over 100 of the Taliban.

Petty Officer Marcus Luttrell joined the United States Navy in March of 1999 and became a combat-trained Navy SEAL in January, 2002. Reading Lone Survivor was like having a conversation with Marcus Luttrell, or rather sitting with him as he told about his experiences. After serving in Baghdad, he was deployed to Afghanistan in the Spring of 2005. Patrick Robinson is known for his best-selling US Navy-based novels and his autobiography of Admiral Sir Sandy Woodward, One Hundred Days, was an international best-seller. I felt like I could stop at any moment and ask a question and he’d answer, but the narrative is such that I didn’t want to interrupt.

Petty Officer Marcus Luttrell joined the United States Navy in March of 1999 and . He lives in England and spends his summers in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, where he and Luttrell wrote Lone Survivor.

Their task was to document the activity of an al Qaeda leader rumored to have a small army in a Taliban stronghold. Five days later, only one of those Navy SEALS made it out alive. This is the story of the only survivor of Operation Redwing, SEAL team leader Marcus Luttrell, and the extraordinary firefight that led to the largest loss of life in American Navy SEAL history

On a clear night in late June 2005, four . Perhaps some of the blame should go to Patrick Robinson, a mediocre war novelist who apparently did most of the actual writing.

by Marcus Luttrell & Patrick Robinson  . The Limits of Organic Life in Planetary Systems.

The narrative takes place in Afghanistan, where the reader follows Marcus Luttrell and a group of . It has since seen a 2013 film adaptation of the same name, with Mark Wahlberg starring as Luttrell.

Luttrell, Marcus; Robinson, Patrick, 1939 . Less then twenty-four hours later, only one of those Navy SEALs remained alive. This is the story of fire team leader Marcus Luttrell, the sole survivor of Operation Redwing, and the desperate battle in the mountains that led, ultimately, to the largest loss of life in Navy SEAL history. From publisher description. Read by Kent T. Collins.

Patrick Robinson, Marcus Luttrell. Axe flanked left, trying to cut off the downward trail, firing nonstop. Marcus, no options now, buddy, kill ’em all!. Marcus, no options now, buddy, kill ’em all! e shadows cast by the last of the trees. It was not far back to waypoint 2, and we took a GPS reading right there. Mikey handed over navigational duties to Axe, and I groaned. Moving up and down these steep cliffs was really tough for me, but the streamlined, expert mountaineer Matthew Axelson could hop around like a fucking antelope. I reminded him of those.

by Marcus Luttrell(Author), Patrick Robinson(Contributor). But it is also, more than anything, the story of his teammates, who fought ferociously beside him until he was the last one left-blasted unconscious by a rocket grenade, blown over a cliff, but still armed and still breathing.

Four US Navy SEALS departed one clear night in early July, 2005 for the mountainous Afghanistan-Pakistan border for a reconnaissance mission. Their task was to document the activity of an al Qaeda leader rumored to have a small army in a Taliban stronghold. Five days later, only one of those Navy SEALS made it out alive. This is the story of the only survivor of Operation Redwing, SEAL team leader Marcus Luttrell, and the extraordinary firefight that led to the largest loss of life in American Navy SEAL history. His squadmates fought valiantly beside him until he was the only one left alive, blasted by an RPG into a place where his pursuers could not find him. Over the next four days, terribly injured and presumed dead, Luttrell crawled for miles through the mountains and was taken in by sympathetic villagers who risked their lives to keep him safe from surrounding Taliban warriors. A born and raised Texan, Marcus Luttrell takes us from the rigors of SEAL training, where he and his fellow SEALs discovered what it took to join the most elite of the American special forces, to a fight in the desolate hills of Afghanistan for which they never could have been prepared. His account of his squadmates' heroism and mutual support renders an experience for which two of his squadmates were posthumously awarded the Navy Cross for combat heroism that is both heartrending and life-affirming. In this rich chronicle of courage and sacrifice, honor and patriotism, Marcus Luttrell delivers a powerful narrative of modern war.
Quttaro
This book was a tremendous story, and I highly recommend it. The horror this young man, and his buddies went through is hard to fathom. What our military put these young men through is hard for any common person to comprehend. It was amazing that he lived. He lost three of his best friends, and barely lived to tell the story. This book is a must read because for one thing, the movie that was made about his ordeal is not completely accurate. The story didn't need to be embellished, but the movie makers thought their vision of what happened was better than that of Marcus Luttrell, and they were very wrong. By reading the book, I knew what actually happened, and it was more intriguing than what the movie portrayed. Some people will never read the book so I guess the movie will give them some idea what it was like, but the book tells the real truth. Marcus' story telling ability kept me riveted to my seat, and brought tears to my eyes to hear what terrible things these young men had to endure. I hope that lots of people will read this book written by a remarkable young soldier.
THOMAS
Fascinating book! Puts us into the minds of soldiers and the brotherhood they adhere to in order to survive and in a sense are addicted. The alpha males and their domain - and I am very grateful for them and their sacrifice. (Spoiler alert) Marcus blames the 'liberal' media for making them decide to let the goat herders go instead of killing them. Ultimately it was the goat herders' release that led the enemy to their doorstep. My problem with this whole 'idea' was why didn't they just gag them and leave them on the hill - and then get out? The mission had been compromised. Hence this is my problem with the guy's premise that it's somehow the liberal media's fault that his buddies got killed? Really? My one complaint is the bashing of 'lefties' 'liberals' and the 'media.' I get the resentment, but I don't get the continual need for his book to go after the 'left' They aren't the enemy - nor is the right. . We are Americans at heart, liberal or right or whatever. Our tenets of freedom of press means we all have the right to speak our mind and our America is everyone's America. This great nation is 'great' because we adhere to a moral ground on certain things and that's important and it's important for the press to look for the stories of the disadvantaged etc. and yes, maybe what they see as abusive power by the military and no we haven't put the Navy Seals into jail for killing Osama Bin Laden - (and yes we had a 'liberal 'President in charge when it happened). The trained soldiers are trained to go into 'harms' way - the press is not - but they are the eyes we need to see the truth. As a navy seal, I would expect you to voice an opinion which was more balanced. I am a patriot too, because I know what our Constitution says - once we sink to the enemies level of 'hatred' and disregard for life - we loose the moral battle. Again, absolutely no disrespect to our soldiers in uniform - I support them and will continue to give money to the veterans groups I support - but PLEASE stop the liberal bashing. In fact, we become our own worst enemies when we make our fellow American's our enemies. I'm so tired of it.
Eigeni
Couldn’t put this book down. As usual the book is much, much better than the movie. Actually, the movie follows along with the books concepts and what Marcus went through but each event was different in the book compared to the movie.

Also, there are a lot of lies out there about how many Taliban they faced. You have these disgusting journalist that want to put our military down and lie. According to eye witness accounts and the military records, Mr. Latrell and his team faced 150 to 200 Taliban. They killed over 100 of the Taliban. The lame and poor excuse for journalist say 32 Taliban and some have even go as far as to say that not even 100 could live in that area; wrong! The 32 number comes from how many Taliban were killed when they rescued Marcus.

Read this book because the movie, is great, but doesn’t do the book justice.
Reighbyra
A book such as Lone Survivor isn’t read simply for pleasure. Choosing it for that reason would only lead to disappointment. I chose it for multiple reasons: curiosity, research for the novel I’m writing, the movie hype and patriotism. It didn’t fail me on any of those counts. After reading the last page, my questions were answered, my curiosity sated and my comparisons made, all without compromising my patriotism.

Reading Lone Survivor was like having a conversation with Marcus Luttrell, or rather sitting with him as he told about his experiences. I felt like I could stop at any moment and ask a question and he’d answer, but the narrative is such that I didn’t want to interrupt.

This book isn’t for the faint of heart; it holds truths that are harsh and ugly. But for those that possess an unwavering love of the United States of America, it’s a testament to the lengths our military will go to serve. It also gives insight into the workings of terrorists and their hatred for what we hold dear. In between, it reveals a narrow gray area where the ancient tradition of lokhay warkawal saved the life of a Navy SEAL.

There were times the writer in me cringed. For example: “And then, very suddenly, a great fog bank rolled in…” That, ‘very suddenly,’ is a double whammy no-no. But in the next paragraph you get something beautiful: “I remember looking down at it, moonlit clouds, so white, so pure, it looked as if we could have walked right across it to another mountain. Through the NODS (night optic device) it was a spectacular sight, a vision perhaps of heaven, set in a land of hellish undercurrents and flaming hatreds.” A splendid visual.

Lone Survivor is a book that I will carry in my mind for a long time, it isn’t easily forgettable. While I’d like to recommend it to everyone, I know there are those that can’t or won’t enjoy it. Luttrell has no ‘love’ for the media or liberal politicians and he gives valid reasons for his stance. If you count yourself among one of those groups, but are willing to see things from his perspective, I encourage you to read the account of Operation Redwing. Of course, pro-military individuals should, and probably already have, read it.
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