» » The People's Tycoon: Henry Ford and the American Century

The People's Tycoon: Henry Ford and the American Century ePub download

by Steven Watts

  • Author: Steven Watts
  • ISBN: 0375707255
  • ISBN13: 978-0375707254
  • ePub: 1663 kb | FB2: 1818 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Historical
  • Publisher: Vintage; 1st edition (October 10, 2006)
  • Pages: 656
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 561
  • Format: azw lrf txt lrf
The People's Tycoon: Henry Ford and the American Century ePub download

Henry Ford may very well be greatest entrepreneur in American history. Another thing that The People’s Tycoon makes clear is that the success of The Ford Motor Company was very much a team effort.

Henry Ford may very well be greatest entrepreneur in American history. Few have had a greater impact on their time and culture the way Ford did in early twenty-first century America. It is an erudite and textured history not only of the man and his company, but also his times.

The People's Tycoon book. I attribute my emotional reactions and great interest in Ford's character to both the skillful writing by author Watts and the fine narration of the text by John Mayer, as I actually listened to the unabridged CD version all the way through (which took me about six weeks from start to finish).

THE PEOPLE'S TYCOON Henry Ford and the American Century. Indeed, the implicit claim of Watts's admirable book is almost inarguable - that it's impossible to understand 20th-century America without knowing the story of Henry Ford

THE PEOPLE'S TYCOON Henry Ford and the American Century. 614 pp. Alfred A. Knopf. Indeed, the implicit claim of Watts's admirable book is almost inarguable - that it's impossible to understand 20th-century America without knowing the story of Henry Ford. He was born in 1863 on a farm near Dearborn, Mich. in the bosom of the traditional rural world he would help obliterate. Obsessed with repairing watches and with the mechanics of farm implements, he was fascinated in his teens by the sight of a self-powered steam engine, and acquired his interest in automotive transport at that moment.

Электронная книга "The People's Tycoon: Henry Ford and the American Century", Steven Watts. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The People's Tycoon: Henry Ford and the American Century" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Charles Sorensen once declared. His greatest failure was his treatment of his only son, Edsel. Many others who observed the relationship between father and son over the years agreed. tive and diligent boy, idolized his father as he rose through the ranks of the Ford Motor Company to assume its presidency in 1919. But Henry, jealous of his own prerogatives and suspicious of his son's softness, sought to toughen up his offspring by undercutting his decisions and fomenting rivalries.

Praise for Steven Watts's The People's Tycoon Watts' judicious exploration of the feats and foibles of Henry Ford provides a timely and compelling model of how to. .The Baltimore Sun. STEVEN WATTS.

Praise for Steven Watts's The People's Tycoon Watts' judicious exploration of the feats and foibles of Henry Ford provides a timely and compelling model of how to cut through the hype and tell. Steven Watts is a professor of history at the University of Missouri and the author of The Magic Kingdom: Walt Disney and the American Way of Life. He lives in Columbia, Missouri. Also by steven watts. The Republic Reborn: War and the Making of Liberal America, 1790–1820. The Romance of Real Life: Charles Brockden Brown. and the Origins of American Culture.

The book covers Henry Ford’s modest beginnings in rural Michigan and his rise to power, becoming one of America’s wealthiest businessmen as well as a global celebrity. The author talked about Henry Ford’s anti-Semitism, his relationship with world leaders such as Lenin and Woodrow Wilson, his quest to improve the lives of the common man, and his belief in consumerism. He answered questions from members of the audience. Steven Watts talked about his biography The People’s Tycoon: Henry Ford and the American Century, published by Alfred A.

The People's Tycoon is an insightful and well-balanced biography of Henry Ford, the man who helped usher in the new mass . Henry Ford did not invent the automobile, but he invented something bigger - twentieth century America

The People's Tycoon is an insightful and well-balanced biography of Henry Ford, the man who helped usher in the new mass consumer society along with the concept of mass production which produced his famed Model T. This car became a symbol of the ordinary person's ability to partake in this new era of plenty and opportunity. Henry Ford did not invent the automobile, but he invented something bigger - twentieth century America. It is no exaggeration to say that without Ford's system of production, without his understanding of the mass market, without his Model T, that century would have been a very different phenomenon.

MY HERO recommends this book to adult readers . Ford was the entrepreneur who first made the automobile affordable but who grew skeptical of consumerism’s corrosive impact on moral values, an employer who insisted on a living wage for his workers but stridently opposed unions, who established the assembly line but worried about its effect on the work ethic, who welcomed African Americans to his company in the age of Jim.

The real Henry Ford was a tangle of contradictions. A rabid anti-Semite, he nonetheless embraced African American workers in the era of Jim Crow. He set off the consumer revolution by producing a car affordable to the masses, all the while lamenting the moral toll exacted by consumerism. He believed in giving his workers a living wage, though he was entirely opposed to union labor. He had a warm and loving relationship with his wife, but sired a son with another woman.

How a Michigan farm boy became the richest man in America is a classic, almost mythic tale, but never before has Henry Ford’s outsized genius been brought to life so vividly as it is in this engaging and superbly researched biography. The real Henry Ford was a tangle of contradictions. He set off the consumer revolution by producing a car affordable to the masses, all the while lamenting the moral toll exacted by consumerism. He believed in giving his workers a living wage, though he was entirely opposed to union labor. He had a warm and loving relationship with his wife, but sired a son with another woman. A rabid anti-Semite, he nonetheless embraced African American workers in the era of Jim Crow. Uncovering the man behind the myth, situating his achievements and their attendant controversies firmly within the context of early twentieth-century America, Watts has given us a comprehensive, illuminating, and fascinating biography of one of America’s first mass-culture celebrities.
Unh
I was motivated to find out more about Henry Ford after visiting the outstanding Ford Museum in Detroit. This book is an exhaustive telling of Henry Ford's life, and the foundations of his phenomenal economic success. You will see how that success led him to believe (as seen by many great businessmen) that their magic touch in business led him to believe he had equal prowess in other areas, with often embarrassing or tragic results. He had some unusual beliefs and ideas that would have been given much less credence if he hadn't been incredibly rich. The lack of introspection and tendency to undermine others that were successful in the company due to an innate jealousy were troubling. Ford believed his own press clippings and longed for the old days (certainly helped in the creation of the Henry Ford & Greenfield village), while at the same time driving change and economic development. From my standpoint, the book dragged at times with overraught details that should have been condensed or summarized - I wanted to say "I get it'". Overall, well written, but would have enjoyed more if condensed by 25% or more. I liked the 1st half of the book more than the 2nd.
Mozel
This is a challenging book for a lot of reasons. The font is the smallest you will find in any major book on the market. It is the size of footnotes in some other books. With 538 pages of actual text plus a prologue, this is a long book. As other reviewers have also noted, Watts quotes newspapers and popular magazines a great deal and often tends to write a paragraph about one of Ford’s achievements and use a quote as a final exclamation mark to his point. The constant use of direct quotes about Ford or his company would be more effective if they were used more sparsely.

The length would also be much less of a problem if the author did not repeat himself and do a lot of commenting. The repetition occurs because the book is not primarily structured chronologically but by categories like “Folk Hero,” “Visionary,” “Father,” and “Despot.” Watts by necessity frequently has to go over some of the same ground for the reader to “catch up” on the topic. For example, it is not until the early 1920’s that Watts goes into detail on Ford’s marriage to his wife Clara. This means going back into the 1800’s, giving details on Clara’s background, and reviewing events up to the time of some of the book’s other divisions. This “catching up” happens several times.

For much of the first 350 pages or so Watts has little but good things to say about Ford. The author has many paragraph or page-length comments about Ford’s impact on America and on Ford’s uncanny ability to visualize machines and his goal of making a vehicle for the “common man.” These comments are not inaccurate but the author does it again and again. The author also has a tendency to use value-laden adjectives like “dynamic” or “great” to describe not just Ford but his associates in the course of Ford’s life. Again these may not be inaccurate but I wish the author would have allowed the events and people’s actions to speak more for themselves and not involved himself so much in the flow of the book.

With chapter 19, “Bigot,” the book’s tone changes dramatically. Ford’s verbal but vicious anti-Semitism and the millions he spent to publicize hatred are important factors in the history of prejudice in this country. Watts does a good job of describing it all but again it appears pretty much out of the blue in the way the book is structured. Maybe Watts divides the book as he does because he clearly wants to separate Ford’s creative abilities and positive impacts from his negative ones. But a more chronological presentation of Ford’s life without the clear topic divisions might allow the reader to see a more integrated person and maybe give us more clues as to why Ford became the individual he was. Watts tries to do this by referring back to Ford’s early views of people with more education or money but I still find Ford’s lifeline fairly disjointed.

So this book definitely has the details of Henry Ford’s life. Watts deserves credit for his extensive research. Parts of the book are page-turning reading like the 1901 auto race in which Ford drove and his mechanic hung onto the outside of the car to balance it. But I found the structure of the book and the wordiness of many of the author’s descriptions and comments made it harder to develop a full picture of Henry Ford as a person.
Enila
Well written, and hard to believe at some points!

What a character Mr. Ford was. I think the greatest strength of this biography is the richness in detailing the everyday Mr. Ford-- the many delightful accounts of him encountering locals in anonymity, like the farmer who was cursing at his Ford-Ferguson tractor-- Old Henry Ford can shove this tractor up his backside! And there was Henry Ford, among the wealthiest men in the world, in overalls and a straw hat. Ford fiddled around under the hood, got the motor running.

Next day the man learned who his visitor had been, and expected to be fired, but Ford never let on that it had happened.

I wanted more technical details on his cars, but that is not this book. I read the section on the Dahlingers twice-- Watts really handles that well.

Did Ford increase his workers's wages by 100 percent in order to avoid paying out his accumulated horde of cash in dividends? He considered his stockholders to be "parasites," and I think the wage increase is best explained as his avoiding rewarding those investors, not in order to give his workers more money so that they could buy more Ford cars.

Suffers from too few photos. Has no maps and no diagrams.
Yggfyn
Henry Ford had so many amazing interests and his life covered such an important part of modern history. Ford wanted to see the world become industrialized because he thought it would give people more freedom from toil. He also wanted people connected to the land. He envisioned a time when people would work in factories but also work the land. He had so many progressive ideas but his motivation left me wondering what kind of person he truly was. I came away feeling he was selfish, brilliant, energetic and much engaged in the world. He did great things which were progressive but I felt his motivation was always to produce more. People were like machines to him.

I liked the way the author organized the book not by timeline but rather by events. The book had me looking at the past but also the issues of today. Ford would have had much to say about the current state of the economy, our health care issues, education, personal responsibility and so much more. The way he carried out most of his ideas did not appeal to me but the ideas were brilliant. Not only did I enjoy reading the book, I also enjoyed thinking about the issues he thought about. If you like history, politics and the story of an amazing family, this is the book for you.
E-Books Related to The People's Tycoon: Henry Ford and the American Century: