» » The Rasputin File

The Rasputin File ePub download

by Edvard Radzinsky

  • Author: Edvard Radzinsky
  • ISBN: 0385489102
  • ISBN13: 978-0385489102
  • ePub: 1824 kb | FB2: 1161 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Historical
  • Publisher: Anchor Books; Reprint edition (December 4, 2001)
  • Pages: 526
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 544
  • Format: mobi azw txt docx
The Rasputin File ePub download

Edvard Radzinsky is the author of the bestsellers The Last Tsar and Stalin, and one of Russia’s most celebrated playwrights. He lives in Russia, where he is also an award-winning television personality.

Edvard Radzinsky is the author of the bestsellers The Last Tsar and Stalin, and one of Russia’s most celebrated playwrights. Also by Edvard Radzinsky. Stalin: The First In-Depth Biography. Based on Explosive New Documents. from Russia’s Secret Archives.

Only 18 left in stock (more on the way). While little is known about Rasputin's life prior to his arrival in Petrograd, but like a good investigator, Radzinsky pieces together what is known and presents the evidence.

The Rasputin File book. Anyway, The Rasputin File is quite an extensive book on this often quite bizarre historical figure, including details I never even knew. If you're into history, biographies or Russian culture, this is definitely a book I would recommend.

Edvard Radzinsky is the author of The Last Tsar and Stalin. A celebrated playwright and television personality, he lives in Russia. Библиографические данные.

A place to which his fame had already preceded him. He was still young. But his face was wrinkled by the sun and wind from his endless wanderings. times already be that of an old man. His endless wanderings had made him an unerring judge of people. Holy Scripture, the teachings of the great pastors, the countless sermons he had listened to had all been absorbed by his tenacious memory. In the Khlyst ‘arks’, where pagan spells against disease were combined with the power of Christian prayer, he had learned to heal

Edvard Stanislavovich Radzinsky (Russian: Э́двард Станисла́вович Радзи́нский) (born September 23, 1936) is a Russian playwright, television personality, screenwriter, and the author of more than forty popular history books.

Edvard Stanislavovich Radzinsky (Russian: Э́двард Станисла́вович Радзи́нский) (born September 23, 1936) is a Russian playwright, television personality, screenwriter, and the author of more than forty popular history books. Edvard Stanislavovich Radzinsky was born in Moscow, Russia on September 23, 1936 to playwrighter Stanislav Radzinsky and his wife Sofia. He studied in the Moscow Archive Institute and is a trained historian.

Электронная книга "The Rasputin File", Edvard Radzinsky. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Rasputin File" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Edvard Radzinsky ( ru. Эдвард Станиславович Радзинский) (b. September 29, 1936, Moscow) is a Russian . Since 1990s, Radzinsky has been writing books in the series "Mysteries of History" ("Загадки истории"). September 29, 1936, Moscow) is a Russian writer, historian and TV personality, author of numerous plays and film scenarios. Radzinsky is also a Rurikid prince as the scion of one of the oldest houses of Russian nobility. Since 1990s, Radzinsky has been writing books in the series "Mysteries of History" ("Загадки истории")

Rasputin File, The Radzinsky Edvard Random House (USA) 9780385489102 Дело Распутина Радзинский Эдвард . Annoyingly, the book does not provide much of a conclusion to Rasputin and is written more in the way of a book of sources rather than a subjective analysis.

Annoyingly, the book does not provide much of a conclusion to Rasputin and is written more in the way of a book of sources rather than a subjective analysis. It would be nice to have a summary opinion from the author who in the end leaves a load of untied threads.

From the bestselling author of Stalin and The Last Tsar comes The Rasputin File, a remarkable biography of the mystical monk and bizarre philanderer whose role in the demise of the Romanovs and the start of the revolution can only now be fully known. For almost a century, historians could only speculate about the role Grigory Rasputin played in the downfall of tsarist Russia. But in 1995 a lost file from the State Archives turned up, a file that contained the complete interrogations of Rasputin's inner circle.

From the bestselling author of Stalin and The Last Tsar comes The Rasputin File, a remarkable biography of the mystical monk and bizarre philanderer whose role in the demise of the Romanovs and the start of the revolution can only now be fully known.For almost a century, historians could only speculate about the role Grigory Rasputin played in the downfall of tsarist Russia. But in 1995 a lost file from the State Archives turned up, a file that contained the complete interrogations of Rasputin’s inner circle. With this extensive and explicit amplification of the historical record, Edvard Radzinsky has written a definitive biography, reconstructing in full the fascinating life of an improbable holy man who changed the course of Russian history.Translated from the Russian by Judson Rosengrant.
unmasked
The author claims that a file of interviews with people who knew Rasputin turned up at auction in the 1990s after being missing for nearly 80 years. The files are heavily quoted in the book, allowing the reader to read the actual words of people who survived the Bolshevik revolution and were interviewed by them, including Rasputin's daughter, Tsaritsa Alexandra's dearest friends Yulia Dehn and Anna Vyrubova, Prince Felix Yussopov, Rasputin's housekeeper, and a multitude of other highly placed men and women who made up Rasputin's inner circle at various points in time. Rasputin is portrayed as being even more debauched that in othe books I have read on him. He was worse during his last year because he was quite sure that he was going to be murdered. The manner in which he made high society Petrograd ladies aware of their sinfulness in described by his live in housekeeper. Anna Vyrubova is not the dim witted young woman people thought, but a cunning, power hungry woman who was more than happy to help the tsaritsa set herself up to run the government while Nikolai II was running WWI from the front. Meanwhile, Rasputin was clever enough to figure out what Alexandra wanted, and so when she wrote letters to the tsar saying that Rasputin was in favor of this or that government appointment, it turns out he was only telling her what she wanted to hear. A number of myths surrounding Rasputin's assassination are debunked as well. The book is a transaltion from the original Russian, so some of the grammar and sentence construction are a bit off in some places. The Kindle edition also has numeroud typographical errors. But the book provides a gripping, new perspective on how influential Rasputin and Vyrubova really were. Highly recommended.
Jarortr
Almost anyone knowledgeable of Russian history, especially around the beginning of the twentieth century, has heard stories about Rasputin and his "control" of the last Tsar of Russia. However, Radzinsky, who has meticulously (at least it seems so) researched Rasputin, challenges and refutes a number of tales about that supposedly powerful supernatural amorous peasant who ran the Russian government through the Tsar and particularly the Tsarina.

In many ways, "The Rasputin File" is like a narrative based on a police report and some reviewers have criticized the book for being a long police report, but I believe Radzinsky tells a compelling and interesting story based on the investigation's file. While little is known about Rasputin's life prior to his arrival in Petrograd, but like a good investigator, Radzinsky pieces together what is known and presents the evidence.

Most importantly the evidence seems to be presented evenhandedly and fairly, drawing upon the testimony of admirers and opponents who often had agendas when they wrote and talked about Rasputin. The story also seems to make sense ... would the "classist" nobility (Tsar and Tsarina) listen to a peasant unless he was telling them what they wanted to hear? Could one peasant visit so many prostitutes in one day? And, what really happened the night of Rasputin's death? What were the murderers motives and were they lying? These are some of the questions Radzinsky addresses. Rasputin was not the devil and his murderers were not all that noble.

Excellent book about an interesting man and time. I believe I understand Rasputin and the Tsars a lot better! However, there are a number of mistakes noticeably after 70% through the Kindle version, such as "a" instead of "at" or "an." Some dates are written as "924" instead of "1924." No glaring mistakes, but they are there ... bottom line, I still very much enjoyed the book and the photographs at the end.
Xanzay
This book is worth reading simply because of the new documentary evidence in the file that Radzinsky unearthed. In the immortal words of Mikhail Bulgakov (in _Master and Margarita_), "Manuscripts don't burn." The evidence in the file offers compelling support for the author's conclusions about the most likely facts regarding Rasputin's dramatic life and still more dramatic death. Finding such source material must be every historian's dream.
Because Radzinsky has a playwright's rather than a historian's sensibility, however, the book is frequently a frustrating read because he doles the new information out to us bit by bit, amongst other solidly researched but more conventional materials. Therefore I recommend this book without hesitation but warn the prospective reader that the book can be slow going. Persevere.
Usanner
This was a very interesting and thorough biography of one of the most legendary and mysterious character in recent history. The power he held over the Russian throne was unbelievable. I enjoyed this book, but it was very hard to get through! The translation was rough, so there was not a great flow. However, I would highly recommend it to anyone interesting in the subject.
Danrad
When I visit Russia or read about it, I find most interesting the "old believers" and the pre Peter the Great Russia. Do these beliefs still exist, or were they wiped out by the communists? One of the difficulties of finding the answer is not having an understanding of what those beliefs were.
Because of lack of communication and bans on travel in Russia that go back to the time of Ivan, there a many Russias. The part of this book I found most valuable was the description of the various monastaries Rasputin visisted and the practices of the khylst sect. This book really gives a sense of the non-European layer of Russia.
I found the book provided a valuable window into a more private side of Russia.
E-Books Related to The Rasputin File: