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After Elizabeth: The Rise of James of Scotland and the Struggle for the Throne of England ePub download

by Leanda de Lisle

  • Author: Leanda de Lisle
  • ISBN: 0345450450
  • ISBN13: 978-0345450456
  • ePub: 1816 kb | FB2: 1577 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Historical
  • Publisher: Ballantine Books; First Edition (1st printing) edition (January 31, 2006)
  • Pages: 334
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 756
  • Format: docx rtf lrf mobi
After Elizabeth: The Rise of James of Scotland and the Struggle for the Throne of England ePub download

After forty-four years on the throne, Queen Elizabeth is in decline. On the bookshelvesAll.

After forty-four years on the throne, Queen Elizabeth is in decline. The formidable ruler whose motto is Semper eadem (I never change) has become a dithering old woman, missing teeth and wearing makeup half an inch thick. Courtesy of Leanda de Lisle’s keenly modern view of this tumultuous time, we are given intimate insights into of political power plays and psychological portraits relevant to our own era. After Elizabeth is a unique look at a pivotal year–and a dazzling debut for an exciting new historian. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Leanda de Lisle's book focuses on the intense period of raised hopes and dashed expectations between Christmas 1602 and Christmas 1603, during which Elizabeth died, James was crowned and the ancient enemies of England and Scotland were ruled by one monarch for th. .

Leanda de Lisle's book focuses on the intense period of raised hopes and dashed expectations between Christmas 1602 and Christmas 1603, during which Elizabeth died, James was crowned and the ancient enemies of England and Scotland were ruled by one monarch for the first time. With its focus on a narrow space of time, this immensely readable history illuminates a wider period, telling in dramatic detail how the suffocating conservatism of Elizabeth’s rule was replaced with that of the energetic James

Leanda de Lisle has done what historians, to date, have overlooked

Leanda de Lisle has done what historians, to date, have overlooked. She spots the story in the seemingly uneventful handover of power to James I after Elizabeth’s death and rediscovers its thrilling drama. This book is unique because, as opposed to other books on Elizabeth or any given monarch, they are 500-plus page behemoths, and this one tackles an important issue that is usually overlooked because Elizabeth's reign was long and famous.

Queen Elizabeth famously refused to marry, causing a foreign-born king to ascend to the English throne in 1603

Queen Elizabeth famously refused to marry, causing a foreign-born king to ascend to the English throne in 1603. The aging Elizabeth remained unwilling to name her successor for fear that courtiers would abandon her to curry favor with the next ruler. Indeed, prominent statesmen and courtiers had, years earlier, had opened channels of communication with the presumptive successor. Elizabeth's senior relative is James VI of Scotland, Protestant son of Elizabeth's cousin Mary Queen of Scots. Courtesy of Leanda de Lisle's keenly modern view of this tumultuous time, we are given intimate insights into of political power plays and psychological portraits relevant to our own era.

Xxv, 334 pages, pages of plates : 25 cm. Many volumes have been written about the reign of Elizabeth I; this book focuses on the critical year her reign ended. Many volumes have been written about the reign of Elizabeth I; this book focuses on the critical year her reign ended, when England lost its childless queen and a Machiavellian struggle ensued to find her successor. December 1602: The formidable ruler has become a dithering old woman. The kingdom has been weakened by the cost of war with Spain and the simmering discontent of both the rich and the poor.

After Elizabeth : The Rise of James of Scotland and the Struggle for the Throne of England. I was always under the impression that, upon the death of Elizabeth and the succession of James VI/I in 1603, Robert Cecil had engineered a relatively quiet and peaceful passage of the Crown. This book is fantastic, it describes how Cecil remained in court favor, how the Catholic faction viewed the new King (with hopes of tolerance not matched by James), Arbella Stuart's attempts at the Crown and the downfall of Sir Walter Raleigh in connection with the "Bye" and the "Main" plots.

But De Lisle has an eye for the odd detail and the contrary evidence that is the mark of a journalist

But De Lisle has an eye for the odd detail and the contrary evidence that is the mark of a journalist. That makes the book a good read and a quick one. Covering the period from just before Elizabeth's death to the coronation of James I, the book does not explode "myths" so much as flesh out stereotypes and show the contradictions inherent in a three-dimensional picture. billiecat, July 3, 2008. This is a history book which focuses on the transition from Elizabeth I to James I (VI of Scotland).

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Elizabeth's senior relative, James VI of Scotland, is a foreigner and a Stuart, excluded from the throne under English . A nicely done and highly readable history of the last years of Elizabeth I and the first years of James VI/I

Elizabeth's senior relative, James VI of Scotland, is a foreigner and a Stuart, excluded from the throne under English law. Around the old queen and the new king swirl a cast of unforgettable characters. A nicely done and highly readable history of the last years of Elizabeth I and the first years of James VI/I. The cast includes Elizabeth and James, both just a little odd (Elizabeth was getting cranky with age and James had the unfortunate habit of drooling all over people); various other contenders for the English throne, including Edward Seymour, Infanta Isabella Clara Eugenia (illustrated by a fantastic portrait that shows her wearing a dress that makes her look like some sort of.

Many volumes have been written about the long reign of Elizabeth I. Now, for the first time, comes a brilliant new work that focuses on the critical year her reign ended, a time in which England lost its childless queen and a Machiavellian struggle ensued to find her successor.December 1602. After forty-four years on the throne, Queen Elizabeth is in decline. The formidable ruler whose motto is Semper eadem (I never change) has become a dithering old woman, missing teeth and wearing makeup half an inch thick. The kingdom has been weakened by the cost of war with Spain and the simmering discontent of both the rich and the poor. The stage has been set, at long last, for succession. But the Queen who famously never married has no heir.Elizabeth’s senior relative is James VI of Scotland, Protestant son of Elizabeth’s cousin Mary Queen of Scots. But as a foreigner and a Stuart, he is excluded from the throne under English law. The road to and beyond his coronation will be filled with conspiracy and duplicity, personal betrayals and political upheavals.Bringing history to thrilling life, Leanda de Lisle captures the time, place, and players as never before. As the Queen nears the end, we witness the scheming of her courtiers for the candidates of their choice; blood-soaked infighting among the Catholic clergy as they struggle to survive in the face of persecution; the widespread fear that civil war, invasion, or revolution will follow the monarch’s death; and the signs, portents, and ghosts that seem to mark her end. Here, too, are the surprising and, to some, dismaying results of James’s ascension: his continuation of Elizabeth’s persecution of Catholics, his desire to unite his two kingdoms into a new country called Britain, and the painful contrast between the pomp and finery of Elizabeth’s court and the begrimed quality of his own.Around the old queen and the new king, swirl a cast of unforgettable characters, including Arbella Stuart, James’s ambitious and lonely first cousin; his childish, spoiled rival for power, Sir Walter Raleigh, who plotted to overthrow the king; and Sir John Harrington, Elizabeth’s wily godson, who switched his loyalties to James long before the queen’s death. Courtesy of Leanda de Lisle’s keenly modern view of this tumultuous time, we are given intimate insights into of political power plays and psychological portraits relevant to our own era. After Elizabeth is a unique look at a pivotal year–and a dazzling debut for an exciting new historian.
HyderCraft
It's a bit hard to follow if you don't already know who the main actors were in this political play and convoluted even if you do, but that's history.

De Lisle does a very good job of weighing the Elizabtethan and Jacobean periods and finding the stronger and weaker points in both, especially in relation to one another. This book is unique because, as opposed to other books on Elizabeth or any given monarch, they are 500-plus page behemoths, and this one tackles an important issue that is usually overlooked because Elizabeth's reign was long and famous. The transition between the Tudor and the Stuart house is very revealing of the times and conditions in the early 17th century, economically, poitically and socially. Throw in the plague and this almost reads like fiction.

The last page is a concise evaluation of the subjective injustices of history and it sums up what went wrong with James's reign and how most of it was not even his fault.
Twentyfirstfinger
Few Americans know the story of the succession of James I to the English throne. The London court was left in limbo after the death of Queen Elizabeth, the virgin queen, who died childless without designating her heir to the throne. James, who was reigning as the King of Scotland, was the closest royal blood relative, his mother being the tragic Mary Queen of Scots, Elizabeth's cousin who was a real threat to Elizabeth. The Catholic minority in England rallied around Mary, one-time queen consort of France, to the extent that Elizabeth finally signed the death warrant to send her cousin to the block. James had not been raised by his mother but by the Protestant element in Scotland, thus making him acceptable to the Protestant majority in England. James was not the only candidate for the English throne, but his supporters managed to move quickly at Elizabeth's death and secure his ascendancy before the other parties got into motion.

I found this story to be fascinating, filling in the gap between the illustrious reign of Elizabeth I and the tragic story of James I's son, Charles I and the Oliver Cromwell protectorate. It doesn't sparkle, probably due to the rather lackluster personality of this king, but the story moves right along without being tedious. Present-day Americans have heard of James I as the sponsorer of the classic King James translation of the English Bible.
Small Black
This book is all over the place. Where was her editor? It is a very dry read, the inter-lapping chapters of James and Elizabeth just fuel confusion for the reader. I don't think this was thoroughly researched, rather she interjects personal opinions where the facts should be. Someone says that it reads like a textbook, and it does, and a bad one at that. Leanda, you got this one very wrong.
Wenaiand
Very difficult to follow and to finish. I love Tudor history and have read many books on it (those by Alison Weir are my favorite). This author, however, is frustrating to me, as she jumps forwards and backwards in history, referring repeatedly to things that she hasn't yet described in the book (such as the Gunpowder Plot). I don't feel she is as disciplined a writer of history as Weir. Perhaps it is an unfair comparison, this being de Lisle's first such book, but I found it very difficult to follow and to finish.
Andromathris
AFTER ELIZABETH fills a gap in other royal biographies, focussing on the death of Queen Elizabeth I and the accession of King James VI to the throne of England as James I. Leanda de Lisle cleverly weaves in earlier history of Q.E. and covers James's arrival from Scotland in more detail than other biographers do. Her writing is lively as she documents the transition that was amazingly smooth, considering that Q.E. would not publicly name her successor and indeed, it was treason to discuss the matter.It's a terrific story well-told with many little-known details.
Jinny Webber, author of THE SECRET PLAYER
Gadar
Ultimately this book fails in its stated mission which is to explain why, despite not being the lawful heir nor being designated as her successor by QE1, James I was able to (literally) walk into the English crown. The author sets up the issue well and limns a number of competing claims and claimants but ultimately stares in wonder as James claims and is given the throne. The most interesting character ends up being Robert Cecil. Where is a good biography go him?
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