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Sorrow Mountain: The Journey of a Tibetan Warrior Nun ePub download

by Adelaide Donnelley,Richard Gere,Dalai Lama,Ani Pachen

  • Author: Adelaide Donnelley,Richard Gere,Dalai Lama,Ani Pachen
  • ISBN: 1568363230
  • ISBN13: 978-1568363233
  • ePub: 1967 kb | FB2: 1515 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Ethnic & National
  • Publisher: Kodansha USA; 1 edition (August 23, 2002)
  • Pages: 293
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 500
  • Format: rtf lrf mobi mbr
Sorrow Mountain: The Journey of a Tibetan Warrior Nun ePub download

Since the publication of Sorrow Mountain in 2000, I have received letters from people throughout the world who felt inspired by. .One day, the daughter of a Khampa chieftain, seventeen-year-old Ani Lemdha Pachen, ran away from home to avoid marrying

Since the publication of Sorrow Mountain in 2000, I have received letters from people throughout the world who felt inspired by Ani Pachen's example. Her courage in the face of devastation. One day, the daughter of a Khampa chieftain, seventeen-year-old Ani Lemdha Pachen, ran away from home to avoid marrying. It wasn't that she disapproved of the match her parents' had arranged, but rather that she preferred the cerebral and peaceful world of a Buddhist nun to the physical demands of traditional married life. Runaway Pachen had spent little time at the monastery, before she returned to her parents.

Sorrow Mountain, Ani Pachen's story as told to Adelaide Donnelley, is a compelling story of a privileged Tibetan girl who, after the . Powerful story of a woman warrior (literally), imprisoned and tortured for her Buddhist beliefs

Sorrow Mountain, Ani Pachen's story as told to Adelaide Donnelley, is a compelling story of a privileged Tibetan girl who, after the Chinese invasion of Tibet, took her father's place as a tribal leader, was captured and spent many years in prison, then finally escaped to McLeod Ganj, Dharamsala India, where she lived out her last years as a nu. Powerful story of a woman warrior (literally), imprisoned and tortured for her Buddhist beliefs.

Ani Pachen & Adelaide Donnelly (2000), Sorrow Mountain: The Journey of a Tibetan Warrior-Nun, New York: Kodansha International, pp 293. Foreword by the Dalai Lama and preface by Richard Gere. Some people live lives of such difficulty and suffering that it is hard to imagine how they carry on. Other people live lives in which they inflict so much suffering and difficulty that it is hard to imagine how they carry on. This book is a story of both kinds of lives.

In February 2002 Ani Pachen died in her sleep. Those of us who knew and loved her are comforted that she lived to see the publication of the book. She continues to take part in demonstrations for a free Tibet, and speaks to people from around the world who have conic to hear her story.

Author: Ani Pachen, Adelaide Donnelley,HH The Dalai Lama, Richard Gere ISBN 10: 0553811959

Author: Ani Pachen, Adelaide Donnelley,HH The Dalai Lama, Richard Gere ISBN 10: 0553811959. See all 3 pre-owned listings. A memoir which recalls the author's childhood in Tibet as the daughter of a local Chieftan and the tragic day her father died when the Chinese invaded destroying its Buddhist culture and heritage. Although in training to be a nun, Ani Pachen lead a resistance movement against the Chinese that resulted in her imprisonment and torture for 21 years. On her release she fled across the Himalayas to India and the Dalai Lama in Dharamasala where she w lives.

Ani Pachen grew up in Tibet, her father providing all she needed. Overnight all that changed. During the Chinese invasion, Ani's father died, she took over and led her people in resistance. Eventually she was imprisoned and tortured for 21 years

Ani Pachen grew up in Tibet, her father providing all she needed. Eventually she was imprisoned and tortured for 21 years. Her spiritual upbringing allowed her to survive, to remain a strong and powerful woman.

Ani Pachen has vivid memories of her life as a young girl in Tibet. Her father, a powerful Khampa chieftain, died, and shortly after, the Chinese invaded Tibet.

Ani Pachen, Adelaide Donnelley, HH The Dalai Lama.

Ani Pachen's autobiography, Sorrow Mountain: the Journey of a Tibetan Warrior Nun, was published in 2000, and she toured the United States and Europe. a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Pachen; Donnelley, Adelaide (2000). Sorrow Mountain: The Journey of a Tibetan Warrior Nun. In 2001, she visited the United Kingdom at the invitation of the Tibet Society, and led the annual march through central London to commemorate the Lhasa Uprising. New York: Kodansha International. Cleland, Elizabeth Christine (2001).

An excerpt from the book and an interview with Ani Pachen Sorrow Mountain: The Journey of a Tibetan Warrior Nun, written with Adelaide Donnelley, is the simply told story o.

An excerpt from the book and an interview with Ani Pachen. Ani Pachen was born in 1933, the daughter of a powerful local chieftain in the great, wild expanses of eastern Tibet. Soon after her twenty-first birthday, as the Chinese invasion thundered through her countryside, Pachen’s father died, leaving her in charge of her family and the freedom fighters he commanded. Sorrow Mountain: The Journey of a Tibetan Warrior Nun, written with Adelaide Donnelley, is the simply told story of Ani Pachen’s extraordinary life, and shows, using the ordinary details of life, how the Chinese government has tried and failed to destroy the heart of Tibet.

Since the publication of Sorrow Mountain in 2000, I have received letters from people throughout the world who felt inspired by Ani Pachen's example. Her courage in the face of devastation, as well as the Buddhist teachings that helped her endure, brought comfort to people experiencing illness, depression, and loss. I heard from others who said they received solace from the book's essential message: the ability of an individual to face unimaginable tragedy and go on. It was a source of great satisfaction to Pachen to know that her story had touched so many, it was the culmination of her dreams. In February 2002 Ani Pachen died in her sleep. Those of us who knew and loved her are comforted that she lived to see the publication of the book. She took great pride in helping to tell the world what happened in Tibet. "After years of suffering, my prayers have been answered," she often said. "I feel blessed." -Adelaide Donnelley 2002
Zacki
The story of Ani Pachen resonates with the kind of courage and spiritual certainty that perhaps very few of us our capable, but all of us admire. In contrast to her indomitable strength, the Chinese occupation of Tibet takes on outrageous dimensions -- an ugliness and brutality hard to bear. For one nine-month period during her twenty-one years of imprisonment, Ani Pachen endured a dark, earthen cell slightly larger than her body where she spent her time praying, accomplishing one hundred thousand prostrations devoted to the well-being of all. When released by the Chinese, she took up the cause of a free Tibet in Lhasa, demonstrating against the torture and murder of her people and country, putting herself in the greatest possible peril. Ani Pachen has lived at the very depths of the soul and sorrow of Tibet and emerged triumphant, a woman of compassion and beauty who will inspire all who read her magnificent story.
Direbringer
I just finished reading this book and didn't want to put it down. The story of Ani Pachen is both horrifying and inspiring, how she against all odds not only survived but kept her faith, battling against her own anger at her captors to try to reach a higher spirit of generosity. The writing of Adelaide Donnelley is gorgeous and poetic, capturing the inner spirit and the mystical beauty of the land in words that lift this book to a high literary level. This book deserves to be widely read over many years. But it! Read it! It will move you.
Marelyne
If you want to read about how the Chinese government has been committing Tibetan genocide, this is a must read. You will also gain insights into Ani Pachen's struggles to pursue her spiritual teaching and fulfill her family role. I have greater insights into what I take for granted after reading Sorrow Mountain and what others have sacrificed.
Villo
If you have any interest in the limitlessness of love, compassion and the strength that brings to the soul this is a read for you.
Whilingudw
I gave this book four stars because this book is a story that people should know. It is the true story of an amazing Tibetan woman who shows strength and courage in unimaginable situations. My problem with this book is that it is poorly written. It could have been an amazing book as well as an amazing story. "Autobiography of a Tibetan Monk" by Palden Gyatso is still the best I have read on the Tibetan people.
Goll
One day, the daughter of a Khampa chieftain, seventeen-year-old Ani Lemdha Pachen, ran away from home to avoid marrying. It wasn't that she disapproved of the match her parents' had arranged, but rather that she preferred the cerebral and peaceful world of a Buddhist nun to the physical demands of traditional married life.

Runaway Pachen had spent little time at the monastery, before she returned to her parents. Despite the shame of what she had done, they not only forgave her but agreed she would not have to marry. Before she could return to the monastery to complete her training, Pachen's father tells her of their country's dire political situation. The Chinese are coming to "liberate" them. As a Khampa princess, she will be expected to lead their people through this situation, especially if the Chief should die. So the young lady received a different type of training instead.

For all her bravery, Pachen was unable to resist for long. She was captured by the Chinese army and spent 21 years imprisoned. This true story focuses on how Pachen's spirituality kept her hopeful and sane during her confinement and during the many tortures she endured. The book is sprinkled with the Buddhist teachings that helped her maintain both her sanity and will to live through these dark days and features an introduction by the Dalai Lama himself.

Apparently Richard Gere also advocated this book's creation and publication. He contributed his own introduction and story of how the book idea was born. He speaks of Pachen's life as a "beautiful, disturbing, and deeply inspiring story." He argues that no "serious literature" in the form of narratives or the "Great Tibetan novel" had emerged from the "Tibetan Holocaust, so a book like this one would be a great boon to the Tibetan cause. Gere, of course, had become a Buddhist and was studying in Tibet at this time.

The story's merits include its insights into the life of a Tibetan woman seeking nunhood during the Mao era, it offers inspiration through triumph against extreme adversity, it draws attention to Tibet's political and cultural situation and the ways in which they have suffered in recent history, and it provides lamanistic teachings.

Despite Pachen's, Donnelly's, Gere's, the Dalai Lama's, and many others' good intentions, however, this book probably has fallen short of its intended goal. The storyline does little to sustain the reader's interest because it is patchy and doesn't flow well (When Gere called it "a miracle of simplicity," he wasn't kidding! Something is clearly lost in translation here.). Although the author supposedly consulted many reliable resources, oddly very little of Pachen's story is put into historical context and few of the sources are used to draw insights into Tibet's situation. Considering the book committee's intentions, I would have expected to find a list of support organizations for Tibet in the appendices. Because of the sketchiness of the writing, it was difficult for me to find the book an inspiration, though other readers might find it so. Those looking for a story of spiritual stamina and female courage may enjoy Pachen's story, while those seeking a new perspective on Tibet should borrow it from a friend or a library rather than spending the money to buy it. Everyone else, just skip it. Sorry Richard, this one's not the great Tibetan novel, either.
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