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Michelangelo: The Artist, the Man and his Times ePub download

by William E. Wallace

  • Author: William E. Wallace
  • ISBN: 1107673690
  • ISBN13: 978-1107673694
  • ePub: 1359 kb | FB2: 1166 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Arts & Literature
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (July 25, 2011)
  • Pages: 424
  • Rating: 4.1/5
  • Votes: 886
  • Format: rtf mbr doc azw
Michelangelo: The Artist, the Man and his Times ePub download

An internationally recognized authority on Michelangelo, William E. .A drawback is that in the process of discussing Michelangelo the man, less time is spent on Michelangelo the artist and his art than I had expected. One person found this helpful.

An internationally recognized authority on Michelangelo, William E. Wallace is the Barbara Murphy Bryant Distinguished Professor of Art History at Washington University, St Louis. He has received fellowships from Villa I Tatti, Harvard University's Center for Renaissance Studies in Florence, and the American Academy in Rome.

Michelangelo is universally recognized to be one of the greatest artists of all time. In this vividly written biography, William E. Wallace offers a substantially new view of the artist. Not only a supremely gifted sculptor, painter, architect, and poet, Michelangelo was also an aristocrat who firmly believed in the ancient and noble origins of his family. The belief in Michelangelo is universally recognized to be one of the greatest artists of all time.

I read a book by William E. Wallace, Michelangelo: The Artist, the Man and his Times.

In this vividly written biography, William E. The belief in his patrician status fueled his lifelong ambition to improve his family's financial situation and to raise the social standing of artists. Michelangelo's ambitions are evident in his writing, dress, and comportment, as well as in his ability to befriend, influence, and occasionally say no to popes, kings, and princes. I read a book by William E. The belief in his patrician status fueled his lifelong ambition to improve his family's financial situation and to raise the social standing of artists

In this vividly written biography, William E. Wallace offers a new view of the artist. Not only a supremely gifted sculptor, painter, architect and poet, Michelangelo was also an aristocrat who firmly believed in the ancient, noble origins of his family. The belief in his patrician status fueled his lifelong ambition to improve his family's financial situation and to raise the social standing of artists

The Artist, the Man and his Times. by William E. Wallace.

The Artist, the Man and his Times. Michelangelo is universally recognized to be one of the greatest artists of all time. Michelangelo's ambitions are evident in his writing, dress, and comportment, as well as in his ability to befriend, influence, and occasionally say "no" to popes, kings, and princes.

book by William E.

William E. Wallace (whose credentials as a scholar of the artist’s career are . He brings the man alive

William E. Wallace (whose credentials as a scholar of the artist’s career are beyond question), in this volume, deals with the last 20-odd years during which Michelangelo served several popes, Paul III (r. 1534-49), Julius III (r. 1550-55), Marcellus II (r. 1555), Paul IV (r. 1555-59) and Pius IV (r. 1559-65), all the time having to ensure he was not in bad odour with the Medici in Florence, where the Buonarrotis had property and could have lost the lo. He brings the man alive. His distorted, murky photographs, however, should never have been published, and do not enhance the book.

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Michelangelo is universally recognized to be one of the greatest artists of all time. In this vividly written biography, William E. Wallace offers a substantially new view of the artist. Not only a supremely gifted sculptor, painter, architect, and poet, Michelangelo was also an aristocrat who firmly believed in the ancient and noble origins of his family. The belief in his patrician status fueled his lifelong ambition to improve his family's financial situation and to raise the social standing of artists. Michelangelo's ambitions are evident in his writing, dress, and comportment, as well as in his ability to befriend, influence, and occasionally say "no" to popes, kings, and princes. Written from the words of Michelangelo and his contemporaries, this biography not only tells his own stories but also brings to life the culture and society of Renaissance Florence and Rome. Not since Irving Stone's novel The Agony and the Ecstasy has there been such a compelling and human portrayal of this remarkable yet credible human individual. Subscribe to William Wallace's podcast on individual works of the master! Click here! Episodes every week, right from this bookmark or your feed reader.
Kamick
While I enjoyed this breezy biography, I wish it had been more substantial when it came to describing Michelangelo's art; it's difficult to see what he contributed to the Renaissance from the mostly superficial descriptions of his work in the book. Wallace spends much more time describing contracts, logistics, and Michelangelo's testy relationship with his nephew, which is understandable because the book is based on the artist's correspondence, but it ends up minimizing his achievements. I would have appreciated a more indepth analysis of Michelangelo's feelings towards the art of his peers - particularly Raphael and Da Vinci, who only receive surprisingly brief mentions.

As for the supposedly important new angle that Michelangelo considered himself an aristocrat, it doesn't affect our view of his work or life substantially, though it does help explain some of his behavior towards his patrons. More interesting was Wallace's debunking of the popular representation of Michelangelo as an antisocial hermit. The book makes clear that he had many significant friendships and that he was gracious and often generous.

I would recommend this biography but would urge readers to supplement it with another book that considers Michelangelo's art more closely, such as Michelangelo and the Pope's Ceiling or Renaissance Rivals: Michelangelo, Leonardo, Raphael, Titian.
Connorise
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. The book took advantage of Michelangelo's large correspondence, which has been largely ignored because it was primarily about family matters. The author develops a thesis that to understand Michelangelo we have to accept that one of his major concerns was his and his family's honor as minor nobility. The book does a good job in developing this thesis. A drawback is that in the process of discussing Michelangelo the man, less time is spent on Michelangelo the artist and his art than I had expected.
Unnis
"Michelangelo, The Artist, the Man, and His Times" is a watershed event, marking a generational transformation in the way we think about the greatest artist of western civilization. This is important. We live in the shadow of Michelangelo. The relationship between creative people and wealthy, powerful patrons: the powerful coming (or should come) as supplicants to the creative--was established by Michelangelo, and ever since, western artists have, often unconsciously, modeled themselves on what they believe Michelangelo to have been like.

Relying on new scholarship, much of it his own (and some the result of exhaustive investigation by Rab Hatfield into Michelangelo's banking records), Wallace demolishes the myth that has grown up around (or instead of) the man. Where we were once asked to believe the artist was an aloof, grouchy, troubled, hypochondriacal loner given to rages and outbursts of violence, and a man wholly unable to work with others in any kind of joint project, Wallace shows, thoroughly and convincingly, that Michelangelo wry, funny, and likeable, was at the center of a large cadre of friends, family, and admirers. He was generous with his money, his time, his concern for others, and his advice. This was a man who could supervise teams of over three hundred construction workers during the initial building phases of the Laurentine Library, and who raised a four-year-old niece and later a nephew. Michelangelo playing with a little girl, on the floor drawing pictures of her feet with her is not the Michelangelo we have been given to expect. The various stories offered up by Vasari and others have been taken by other writers as historical truth. Wallace is careful to sift through the historical record and filter out suspiciously tall tales.

I advise anyone reading this book to also buy Wallace's "Michelangelo Sculpture Painting Architecture," a comprehensive "complete works" without the pretensions of the recent 14-pound Taschen footrest of a volume. Wallace's biography obviously can't supply the images he talks about. (This is a problem with all artist biographies.)

Wallace focuses on projects other writers skate past. When Michelangelo is coerced into creating a huge bronze statue of Pope Julius II in Bologna, a seated figure twelve feet tall, few writers have seemed to comprehend what a gigantic engineering challenge this was. Wallace makes clear the almost endless intense work involved in creating such a gigantic object.
Wallace is forced by the very nature of the subject to treat the Sistine ceiling in painfully few pages but here again, as with the bronze Julius, an entire book would be (and has been) required to cover the material. He limits himself to an overview of the ceiling and doesn't touch the complexities of its creation. But he scarcely could. It's too complex. I suggest watching "The Divine Michelangelo," in which Wallace participated. It can be found in sections on YouTube.

The book opens with narrative style, describing the Rome that Michelangelo at 21 would have seen as a near ruin, a far cry from the flourishing Florence, his homeland. It then commences a brisk and comprehensive retelling of the creation of the Bacchus (for Cardinal Riario) and the Pieta. Here Wallace is careful to say only what he knows. After explaining that the Bacchus was "eventually acquired" by the banker Jacopo Galli, and only suggesting (instead of asserting, as is usual) that Riario didn't like it, Wallace says that Michelangelo "spent five ducats on a piece of marble that proved to be bad, and then purchased another for five more ducats." No mention is made here of what that marble may have been used for, and this may be Wallace's way of avoiding the (for now) very unsettled issue of the Young Archer statue, currently at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and championed as a Michelangelo but by no means generally accepted as one. (I've seen it. It isn't.)

Later Wallace tells the almost universally accepted story that Michelangelo carved a "sleeping cupid" that so matched the antique in style that it was indistinguishable from an antique, apart from the fact that it was obviously brand new, and at the suggestion of a friend distressed and aged it so that he could "sell it more profitably." The cupid is said to have then been sold to Cardinal Riario as an antique. Riario, we have been told, somehow figured out he'd been duped; Michelangelo hurried to Rome to straighten matters out. Much has been made out of this story, especially by some current art historians looking for proof of Michelangelo's capacity and willingness to commit deliberate forgeries and pass them off as genuine antique statuary, but Wallace shrewdly suggests that this story, too, might be a fabrication.

This kind of responsible scholarly restraint is evident throughout the book. Where Vasari tells us that Michelangelo's friend (they were both teenagers) was exiled from Florence for breaking Michelangelo's nose, Wallace warns us that there may be "a hint of embellishment" here. Indeed. Tactful.

Throughout the Raiders-of-the-Lost-Ark-Final-Warehouse-Scene avalanche of literature on Michelangelo the "hint of embellishment" has been too often permitted to pollute our understanding of the man and his times. Wallace avoids all the pitfalls that Michelangelo himself warned of when he complained that an ambassador insisted on some kind of confession or apology the ambassador felt owed. "My answer is that he has fashioned a Michelangelo of his own." Previous writers could have fashioned a Michelangelo out of facts, rather than one of their own.

Finally scholars, Wallace chief among them, are starting to cast overdue doubt on the more mythological claims, the hagiography, and whatever one might call the reverse of hagiography is (it's not exactly iconoclasm) and are bringing to light a real man whose accomplishments, in the now revealed ordinarinesses of his life, make his extraordinary accomplishments all the more astonishing.
I am loath to write in books, so it's a mark of a centrally important text when I find myself making notes in margins, or highlighting or dog-earing pages. My copy of "Michelangelo The Artist, the Man, and His Times" is covered with marginalia.

"Michelangelo, The Artist, the Man, and His Times" is a vital and seminal work. I cannot recommend it highly enough.

While seasoned Michelangelo scholars will read this book, it's also for students of the Italian Renaissance at all stages of expertise. Better to start off right to avoid unlearning the myths of lesser minds.
Gardall
A very factual account of the great master's life. A biographer has a dilemma of writing something accurate vs. entertaining which often times contradicts with historicity. I appreciate casting of a more truthful picture of Michelangelo the person waling on earth which removes much of the commonly believed fictional skew of his character. However, the book was a dry academic read due to abundance of notes, factual references and over-analysis of uninteresting aspects of the master's life. The greatness of the artist doesn't shine through the book otherwise I would give it 5 stars.
Forcestalker
Wallace's account at times may seem a bit doe-eyed-- in love with his subject-- but I liked the personal touch that Wallace brings to the narrative very much...an easy read, full of details and educated assumptions that rival earlier "takes" with regards to Michelangelo's personality and demeanor, especially in old age. After reading this book, I have day dreams of visiting Italy personally to see the famous artist's work first hand.
Kekinos
It is a well written book but it lacks pictures of Michelangelo's works as it goes along and speaks about them. There are a few pictures at the very beginning of the book but they are not coordinated with anyting and they fall very short of Michelangelo's creations.
Gribandis
The narrative quality of this book makes it very engaging. I'm using it as a textbook in my Michelangelo class and the students are actually READING it! A book! They are reading a book! And I know they are reading it, well before the exams, because they are asking me questions based on what they read. This is exciting.
Great book if you like historical biographies. Limited pictures, so have a reference guide to his works.....or use your phone to access Michelangel’s work. Book provides a realistic view of his life and the economic and political conditions during the early renaissance period.
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