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Searching for the Sound: My Life in the Grateful Dead ePub download

by Phil Lesh

  • Author: Phil Lesh
  • ISBN: 0743546458
  • ISBN13: 978-0743546454
  • ePub: 1727 kb | FB2: 1569 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Arts & Literature
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio; Abridged edition (April 19, 2005)
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 536
  • Format: lrf lit mbr azw
Searching for the Sound: My Life in the Grateful Dead ePub download

After reading Phil's book, I have to commend him for the title. An intimate autobiography of the author's life focusing on the birth and evolution of the Grateful Dead and his relationship with other band members, especially Jerry Garcia.

After reading Phil's book, I have to commend him for the title. 16 people found this helpful. In describing his development as a musician, composer and performer, Lesh writes intellectually in a technological style that was at times difficult for this musical layman to follow.

Right in time for the Grateful Dead's 40th anniversary, eccentric bass player extraordinaire Phil Lesh has delivered fans a most welcome gift: his autobiography

Right in time for the Grateful Dead's 40th anniversary, eccentric bass player extraordinaire Phil Lesh has delivered fans a most welcome gift: his autobiography. There are many books out there about the Dead told from the perspective of roadies, journalists, third party observers, and fans.

Grateful Dead bassist Phil Lesh has written the memoir one might have expected: energetic and flawed, but sure to. .After reading Phil's book, I have to commend him for the title.

Grateful Dead bassist Phil Lesh has written the memoir one might have expected: energetic and flawed, but sure to be loved by fans. Lesh joined the band's original members-Jerry Garcia, Bob Weir, Bill Kreutzman and "Pigpen" Ron McKernan-in 1965 and helped morph the legendary outfit from its beginnings as a jug band to the unique, psychedelic improvisational jam band that spawned arguably the most loyal, iconic audience in popular music history: the Deadheads.

Phil Lesh first met Jerry Garcia in 1959 in the clubs of Palo Alto, California.

The Best book so far on the Dead. com User, April 17, 2005. No one book can ever tell the entire tale of the Grateful Dead

The Best book so far on the Dead. No one book can ever tell the entire tale of the Grateful Dead. The book starts with Lesh's birth and quickly moves on to his discovery of music.

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My Life in the Grateful Dead. In this ruthlessly honest bestseller, the bass player for the greatest improvisational band in American history tells the full, true story of his life, Jerry Garcia, and the Grateful Dead.

My Life in the Grateful Dead. Published May 3, 2005 by Simon & Schuster Audio.

Such a sentiment disappoints founding member Phil Lesh. For him, the Dead were all about the music, not just consciousness expanding or hippies draped in tie-die.

An insider's look at the behind-the-scenes history of one of the world's most beloved bands told from the point of their bass player offers an honest and intimately detailed description of the people and events that made music history. Read by the author. Simultaneous.
Mr.jeka
Full disclosure: I'm 66 and have always liked the Dead, but I'm not a Dead Head and I've never seen them live. Tracks from Workingman's Dead and American Beauty got heavy FM airplay back in the day, and I liked them enough to buy those 2 albums. But I lost touch with them after that, until, of course, the 1987 re-emergence with Touch of Grey on MTV. After Garcia died in 1995, I figured they were done, and pretty much forgot about them. But the hype that built for the 50-year anniversary concert got me interested again. Now that I'm retired, I have plenty of time to do research, so I watched a few Youtube concerts and decided to read a book about the band. It seemed logical to try one written by a band member, so it was Phil's book that I began with. I found it so interesting that I began to watch more Youtube, and was thrilled when I'd see something that Phil mentioned in his book. Just one example was the 4-17-1972 Copenhagen concert where they all donned Bozo masks. Seeing it after reading about it was really cool. I liked the book so much that I started another book, So Many Roads, written by a Rolling Stone reporter who had followed the band for years. It was great to get two different points of view, one from inside the band, the other from outside. After reading Phil's book, I have to commend him for the title. "Searching for the Sound" is exactly what he was always doing with the Dead, and happily is still doing with his own collaborations today.
Ichalote
Phil did a fine job on his biography. He wrote the book in a manner which left out a lot of the seedier parts and glorified the best parts of the Grateful Dead. One gets the feeling that he truly enjoyed his journey through life, as his intelligence allowed him to make the smart choices which lead to his fruitful career with the Dead as well as a happy home life. Even when things looked grim as an overweight alcoholic, playing shows and making enough money to "keep playing for free", being ripped off by the drummer's father and Rakow and being set up and busted in NOLA, he persevered. He never stopped - doing it for the music. He speaks in musician's language about some songs/songwriting. but not so much it would distract a non-musician. Also, have a dictionary handy - he uses words I had never stumbled across (his intelligence, again...). Strongly recommend this book to any Deadhead.
Dellevar
An intimate autobiography of the author's life focusing on the birth and evolution of the Grateful Dead and his relationship with other band members, especially Jerry Garcia. In describing his development as a musician, composer and performer, Lesh writes intellectually in a technological style that was at times difficult for this musical layman to follow. However this book is a very rewarding read, especially for anyone wishing to learn about or to relive the phantasmagorical events that occurred in and around the 1960's San Francisco psychedelic rock scene and beyond. A must read for Deadheads and wannabes, Lesh's incredible attention to detail leaves the reader gratified and craving for more.
Blackworm
If you plan to read only one book about the Dead, choose McNally's for its exhaustive research and attention to detail. If you plan to read most of them -- and let's face it, if you got this far, you might -- Phil's is one to pick earlier rather than later.

The book is most similar to Rock Scully's in its emphasis. The early tours get a lot of weight, perhaps since they were memorable for guys who mostly never traveled out of California before. The midway point of the book is at 1970. Nothing seems to stand out in his mind from the 20 years of touring from 1975-retirement except the trips to exotic places (Europe, Stonehenge, Egypt), events with his wife and kids, and maybe playing Madison Square Garden. Well, maybe you remember events in high school and college better than 20 years of punching the clock too, right? It's interesting to see it from the band's perspective.

The basic narrative--Palo Alto / Chateau, Neal Cassady, the Acid Tests, living with Bear in Watts (my favorite), the Haight, first tours... recording the canonical albums at Heider's, the Europe 72 tour, getting ripped off by Lenny Hart, getting ripped off by Ron Rakow... late 70s / 80's malaise, late-80's redemption -- is pretty familiar by now, covered in books published from '82 (Blair Jackson's first) to 02. You almost need a revisionist history to earn the right to publish another book. Phil adds lots of new vignettes to all of these episodes, but basically plows ahead like nobody else had published first.

What makes the book worthwhile is that you get to spend a lot of time with Phil Lesh being his best self -- idealistic, earnest, thoughtful, considerate of his "brothers in music" -- but still ironic, rueful, arrogant as he ever seemed in interview or on tape. It is reassuring to learn that he really believed in the whole enterprise in the same way, and maybe as much, as any of the deadheads did.

One note about the Kindle edition -- cited photographs are not to be found.
Flarik
When this book was first published in hardcover I read it in one sitting. Lesh is my favorite member of the Dead, with Pigpen and Jerry being tied for second. I feel that this book is very well written, fascinating and informative. What especially stands out for me is the actual TONE of Phil's writing; he comes across as compassionate and caring. Even when being critical of a person or group of people, he does so in a very kind manner( in contrast to the tone of Bill Kreutzmann's recently published autobiography, of which I will be posting a review soon). Our son Phillip is named after him( my best DeadHead friend at the time and I didn't really give my wife any choice in the matter!).
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